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  1. #1
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    Bleaching Fuji instant Fp 100 negative

    I have read on

    http://new55project.blogspot.com/201...post_6525.html

    that you can bleach negative from Fuji FP100 C and B, and there is description with pictures how to do it. But I am failing, my bleach is not doing anything. On my bleach that I got from local shop says: Sodium thiosulfate and Potassium ferricyanide (google translator from Polish).

    Anyone had tried this? Which bleach should I use?

    thanks,

  2. #2
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    You're looking for chlorine bleach, not photographic silver bleach. Like the kind you use to run laundry. The purpose of the bleach is to soften the black backing until you can wipe it off.
    --Nicholas Andre

  3. #3
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    You're looking for chlorine bleach, not photographic silver bleach. Like the kind you use to run laundry. The purpose of the bleach is to soften the black backing until you can wipe it off.
    Thanks . I knew it that I misunderstand something

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    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    I've gotten a fairly interesting negative from my 100C. It's a moderately high contrast low saturation negative which can be printed optically. The pattern around the edges is cool too.
    --Nicholas Andre

  5. #5

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    I use liquid swimming pool chlorine. Its much stronger than the household stuff. Also watch you don't buy a household bleach with additives like soaps, scents, suds!
    Don't get any on your clothes unless you want to look like a tye dye hippy.

  6. #6
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkosaric View Post
    I have read on

    http://new55project.blogspot.com/201...post_6525.html

    that you can bleach negative from Fuji FP100 C and B, and there is description with pictures how to do it. But I am failing, my bleach is not doing anything. On my bleach that I got from local shop says: Sodium thiosulfate and Potassium ferricyanide (google translator from Polish).

    Anyone had tried this? Which bleach should I use?

    thanks,
    You may be glad nothing happened, probably due to the fact you had the emulsion side down while applying the bleach, as per the instruction of the link you posted. If you had used a ferricyanide bleach on your images, your FP100B BW negatives would have gone almost transparent, as ferricyanide turns the silver of BW negative into an almost colourless silverferri/ferrocyanide complex. Ferricyanide bleach is a first step for a two bath sepia toning kit.

    Not sure why the bleach you bought, contains sodium thiosulfate. It shouldn't. Or is this a second bottle? It than probably is sodium sulfide or thiourea instead of sodium thiosulfate. It is the tonersolution that is used after the ferricyanide bleach... Try it out on a print once, you will probably get a nice brown tone
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

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  7. #7
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    This bleach that I used was powder one, that you mix it with 0.4 liter of water. Can't say anything more about it - since all text was on polish, and I am not very good at it . Thanks for extra tips about swimming pool chlorine and clothes

  8. #8
    Marco B's Avatar
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    It really sounds like you picked up a two bath sepia toner. In that case, the powders should NOT have been mixed (but of course, the polish instructions would not have helped ), but dissolved to create two separate baths, one bath for bleaching BW silver images, the other to redevelop them to a brown sepia tone.
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  9. #9

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    I didnt know that you could do that with the neg side. Sweet! I found some one who scans the neg side once its dry. Saddly, I am normally out in the woods somewhere, or being ushered out of where ever I shouldnt have been photographing, I dont get the opportunity to let my neg side dry too much before it all gets shoved in a bag.

    Thanks for the link.
    M. David Farrell, Jr.

    ----------------------------------------------
    ~Buying a Nikon doesn not make you a photographer. It makes you a Nikon owner!

    ~Everybody has a photographic memory, but not everybody has film!

  10. #10

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    Sodium Thiosulphate is often used to dechlorinate water for aquarium fish so would have some effect on deactivating bleach.

    I do it like I wrote here http://frontdrive34.blogspot.com/2010/04/blog-post.html

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