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  1. #1
    SrdjanMatejic's Avatar
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    Fuji FP100C, keeping it clean till dry?

    Hello all!


    I'm new registered to APUG, but i've been reading for some weeks.


    I use many diff. cameras in different formats, but mostly the Polalaroid Mod 250, and with that one almost only Fuji FP-100C color film.
    It is available at a reasonable price around here.

    But since the beginning, i have problems with handling the film.

    The surface is somehow "wet" and soft for quite some time after the exposure, and this creates problems with storing.

    I always end up with a lot of dust, fingerprints or scratches on the film.


    Is there a simple way to avoid this?
    I tried storing it in a note-book, but then it sticks to the paper, and the surface gets damaged...



    Thanks for suggestions!







    PS: and feel free to take a look at the pics on my blog...

  2. #2

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    I love that fuji film. I haven't had too much problem with it gather fingerprints and such, but I have it set on a table for at least 5 mins and dry before moving it around. Even then its in a notebook or between some paper towels.

    Depending on how you shoot you could try bringing a small pop-up container to store them in until they are dried while you shoot more. Also, i've never tried it myself, but once they have set for a while, you could put the image side to wax paper in your notebook. But I'd leave them out on a dust free shelf for 24 hours just to make sure their set.

    How humid is your environment? Most of my shooting with the fuji was fall/winter and very dry.

  3. #3
    SrdjanMatejic's Avatar
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    The first five minutes are the problem.
    Most of the time I'm outside, and often there is dust in the air.
    If i leave it to dry, it collects tons of it. If i put it away, it sticks to anything, even wax paper.
    So i have to hold it with the print side down till it is dry, and then store it.

    That gives me an average of 8 pics per hour, which is sometimes not bad, considering the price of the material.
    But i have missed some great shots, just because of that sticky print in my hand.

  4. #4

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    Try carrying some small container such as a rubbermaid food storage cup with lid thingy that would hold the film. Pop a few small holes throughout the container. When you have a freshly exposed shot, pop it in the container and seal it. The holes should provide ventilation with out letting much dust in. If your super paranoid you could cut a couple square inch hole in the top and tape some cheese cloth across it to act as a filter.

  5. #5
    SrdjanMatejic's Avatar
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    Hey, that's a great idea! I like it, thanks!

  6. #6

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    Let us know how it works out

  7. #7

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    keep the box...

    that the film comes in. Throw your exposed image in the box to dry- keeps out the dust and has enough headroom to not touch the top of the image. You can put two photos in the box back to back to dry- since you usually have some curl to the photo, only a small portion will touch the cardboard box. And if your film is not curling, just put some dimples in the corners of the box on both sides- only four points of cardboard box will touch each photo.

    You can only store two at a time, but it beats holding on to each shot for five minutes.

    Good Luck, I love that film- especially in the absurdly expensive 4x5 version!

    Matt



 

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