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  1. #11
    JLP
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    I don't understand much of what PE is writing but i do respect him for his contribution to this site and analog Photography.
    It always impress me no matter what it is
    _______________
    Jan Pedersen
    http://janlpedersen.com

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by JLP View Post
    I don't understand much of what PE is writing but i do respect him for his contribution to this site and analog Photography.
    It always impress me no matter what it is
    I met a retired Hasselblad repairman last year who reminds me of PE. I happened to bump into him while reading at a book store, after which he gave me a four hour lecture on camera history from his insider's point of view. The repair facility he worked at serviced Hasselblads from various celebrities (e.g., I remember Sammy Davis, Jr. being one of them but there were many others). It was like a Godsend; he definitely possessed more than enough information to write an advanced book or to speak at an advanced photography workshop. At first, he just seemed like an ordinary guy. But, it was probably the most interesting talk I've ever had about photography.

  3. #13
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. I hope that the instigators of this project DO know what I am talking about.

    Almost any of us old EK guys could talk for hours about making analog products, and there are probably quite a few here that might be interested in hearing us. I try to put some of that flavor into the interviews on Inside Analog Photography.

    PE

  4. #14
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    I would love the opportunity to use Type 55 film. I have seems like a great idea, most of histories great photographers used it from time to time.

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    We're not going to resurrect T55 film. There is still a little bit out there so if you want to try it you might still have a chance. Otherwise it is gone the way of Kodachrome.

    PE, thanks for the tip. Have you seen Quall's HC-110 monobath, and the results? I have not found anything in Haist that is as convenient. The real question is can we make an active DTR receiver easily or not? There are so many formulations mentioned in patents and Old Pol and Fuji's are completely different. I'd like to formulate a fast acting lead acetate bath that I can simply spray glossy inkjet paper with, then topcoat with release agent (soap). If it is easy, we'll try for a P/N, and if not, a field processable negative only in 4x5.

  6. #16
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    Bob;

    I remember little about receiver sheets for B&W. I know that the best "goo" used Carboxy Methyl Cellulose and also HMMP (Hydroxy Methyl Methyl Phenidone). Most other Phenidone derivatives ring open with keeping and go bad. I also know that the outside of the pod must be coated with an indicator dye to alert you to "leakers" as the pods tend to leak very very easily. Pods must be packed under an inert atmosphere.

    I also know that there are many goo formulas and that they must be tailored to the specific film emulsion and to the receiver sheet being used so that nucleation takes place correctly. The timing layer is there to normalize results if the user fails to peel at the right time or if the temperature is too high or low.

    Just as with so many things in Analog, an entire book could be written. If you send me some patent #s in a PM or E-mail, I will try to review them and give you an opinion, but that opinion may be way out of line due to lack of direct experience and the passage of time and its effect on the advance in technology and my memory.

    BTW, one of Grant's monobaths was used in the orbital photo system. The photo material was called BIMAT and had a tacky or "wet" sheet and the dry film sheet. After exposure, they were laminated together giving a positive "dry" image that was scanned or sent back to earth by reentry. At this time, the entire machine is setup in the entrance lobby of George Eastman House.

    PE

  7. #17
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    So, knowing how hard this can be, your work is not so much bringing a smile to my lips but rather making me laugh because I know how hard it is to do something like this.
    Not laughing, but nevertheless I take the same stand as PE.

    It's great however that people dare to take initiatives!
    Especially with all that whining here.

  8. #18
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    I agree with AgX. Bravo!

    PE

  9. #19

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    After successfully using some of Grant's monobaths, and also mixing up CMC and HMMP bodied reagents, I can tell you it isn't going to be long before we get one that works, at least at just the right time and temp.

    I'm curious about the tacky wet sheet material that was used with BIMAT. Can I get a sample? Seriously, what was it? The image from the moon's far side done with that system looks pretty fine to me.

  10. #20
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    Bimat is no more, and I doubt if there is anyone around that still knows the formula.

    Basically it was a monobath in a thick coating on one film, and a regular film for taking the photo. There was no image transfer involved and the bimat "donor" was peeled away from the image layer which was scanned for transmission to earth. There was some sort of delaminating chemical that allowed for a clean separation between the two without adhesion of any of the chemistry to the film layer, but which allowed a clean lamination for uniform imaging.

    PE

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