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Thread: LomoKino

  1. #11
    MDR
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    You're probably better off with Fomapan 100R or Filmotec Orwo UN54 both are designed for reversal processing and can be used for filmmaking especially Orwo UN54 which actually is a motion picture film stock and a very good one at that. But nothing speaks against using Tmax in the Lomokino (Exposure time is ca. 1/100 and it has three aperture settings at least according to the Lomographic guys) use f8 and be there at least in sunlight

    Dominik

  2. #12
    rhmimac's Avatar
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    http://microsites.lomography.com/lomokino/

    Great things are coming from Vienna these days.

  3. #13

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    This looks like a good way to get a high fps lomo camera. Yes a print might be at an unusual aspect ratio, but I think it would be kind of cool to throw a roll of tri-x in there and develop and enlarge some of the frames.

  4. #14
    John Austin's Avatar
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    Play for free,

    The co-ordinator of the local Saturday morning kids club is seriously interested in a Lomokino to show the group how film started - I shall be first to play, oops, I mean work, with it and reverse process some BW

    This is going to be a fun alternative to my Oh-So-Serious 10x8" work - Last WPPD QKC did a pinhole workshop - Results at http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/20...lub&searchStr=

  5. #15
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
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    I have the LomoKino and enjoy using it. From my perspective, it doesn't really pay to do reversal processing, since you can't run the film through a conventional film projector afterward, due to the odd-ball frame size. So, you're going to have to scan the film anyway in order to get it into a format that you can convert to a digital movie; it might as well be C-41 or hand-processed B/W.

    The LomoKinoScope is, in my view, not a tool for serious playback of the film, just a handy viewer to see what you have.

    As for the aperture setting on the camera itself, it has a continuous range of apertures from f/5.6 to f/11. Since the shutter is 1/100s in speed, using a handheld light meter is a handy way to ensure good exposures. Just set your meter to your film's ISO, reference the 1/100 speed and see if your scene is within the camera's f/5.6-11 range and set the aperture accordingly. If not, you have to change your scene's lighting or change film.

    ~Joe

  6. #16
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    So regular negative film will work and in the viewer playback you see a positive image??
    This looks so cool .
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe VanCleave View Post
    I have the LomoKino and enjoy using it. From my perspective, it doesn't really pay to do reversal processing, since you can't run the film through a conventional film projector afterward, due to the odd-ball frame size. So, you're going to have to scan the film anyway in order to get it into a format that you can convert to a digital movie; it might as well be C-41 or hand-processed B/W.

    The LomoKinoScope is, in my view, not a tool for serious playback of the film, just a handy viewer to see what you have.

    As for the aperture setting on the camera itself, it has a continuous range of apertures from f/5.6 to f/11. Since the shutter is 1/100s in speed, using a handheld light meter is a handy way to ensure good exposures. Just set your meter to your film's ISO, reference the 1/100 speed and see if your scene is within the camera's f/5.6-11 range and set the aperture accordingly. If not, you have to change your scene's lighting or change film.

    ~Joe

  7. #17
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Ok stupid question, but I still think this is a very cool item. I have a Cannon 5d and can put it on video mode, but this could be a ton of fun.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnielvis View Post
    you know.....in the olde days, they used to PRINT ENTIRE MOVIES on paper for copywrite purposes---this is when the law only allowed items printed on paper to be copywrited--as there was no other media at the time...so to ensure protection of their rights, they filed contact prints of the film on paper for the copyrite.

    but anyways....I was going somewhere with this....like print on paper and put it on one of those spinwheels that provides intermittant motion...or A FLIP BOOK...yeah...that's it.....maybe blow em up too --- you'd need to enlarge strips though--I just saw someone with a carrier that just sold for long strips of filim inthe enlarger---

    ideas.....far more ideas than time
    The paper strips made into a flipbook?
    Try here http://wichm.home.xs4all.nl/cinimage.html
    It's the kinora camera. Takes 1" strips of paper or film, and those get processed into a flipbook that goes on a special viewer.

    To reply to OP, you may enjoy a cheap 8mm camera more. While it isn't 35mm, and has those other drawbacks, you can use standard equipment to view and project your film, as well as you get more run time per roll. Just my 2 cents. The lomokino just seems really expensive for what it is and what it can do, which an ordinary 35mm with a motor drive does.

  9. #19

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    Just thought I'd stop in (actually forgot I had an apug account :/ ) and let everyone know I motorized my lomokino with a cordless drill. APUG doesn't let me post links but search for motorized lomokino and it should show up on youtube.

    I'm doing a lot more shooting with it in the upcoming week... bulk loading some 5248 shortends and wastage. It's ability to use wastage is what I like most about it. It's biggest weakness isn't the short loads, 5 second daylight loads ought to be enough for anyone shooting a music video... but it's the lack of registration and the very short/ nonexistant take-up loop... so when driven at higher speeds the film is still moving with the shutter being open. ... however I only have expired film to work with and processing in caffenol so I'm happy with more than 4 shades of gray

    One think I've noticed while bulk loading is that the metal canisters work a lot better...the plastics were binding. I'm yet to checkito make sure full 36exp self loads work... 24exp do...

    Obviously if you buy commercial rolls and have a lab process then this gets to be a very expensive toy.

    The hardest thing for me to get used to is having to rewind a movie camera

  10. #20

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    the

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