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Thread: LomoKino

  1. #21

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  2. #22
    arealitystudios's Avatar
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    I was at my local camera shop yesterday picking up a few rolls of film and noticed this thing on the shelf. I decided, hey, why not? It wasn't expensive and it could be fun. I play around with Super 8mm every once in a while and this might be a fun alternative.

    One thing I always find hilarious about Lomo products is the literature that comes with the cameras is often of incredible quality. In this case the camera came with a "journal" that tells the story behind the creation of the Lomo Kino along with some nice images and drawings. I will never get over the fact that you can buy a modern Canon or Nikon for thousands of dollars with all the bells and whistles you can think of and it will come with an instruction manual that looks like it was photo copied and written by a five year old. But if you buy a Lomo you will get a bare bones plastic camera with a coffee table book in full color and glossy printing.

    Go figure...

    But anyway, all that being said all I've done so far is shoot a couple of rolls of my dog in the back yard. I shot it in black and white and plan on developing the rolls tonight to see what came out. The fixed shutter speed and limited choice of aperture isn't much different from shooting with a Holga. I'm not sure how much I'm going to enjoy the wide 16:9 aspect ratio but who knows, I may get used to it and embrace it a little more going forward. The concept seems very straight forward and I anticipate scanning each individual frame to put into a short movie to be kind of a b*tch but that's ok.

    I'm actually looking forward to the challenge of trying to tell a story in about 40 seconds. Call me crazy, but I think it's a little easier to tell a story with a single frame. Maybe not eaiser, just more what I'm used to doing so if nothing else the creative excercise might be fun.

  3. #23
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arealitystudios View Post

    One thing I always find hilarious about Lomo products is the literature that comes with the cameras is often of incredible quality. In this case the camera came with a "journal" that tells the story behind the creation of the Lomo Kino along with some nice images and drawings. I will never get over the fact that you can buy a modern Canon or Nikon for thousands of dollars with all the bells and whistles you can think of and it will come with an instruction manual that looks like it was photo copied and written by a five year old. But if you buy a Lomo you will get a bare bones plastic camera with a coffee table book in full color and glossy printing.

    Go figure...
    Actually that tells you a whole lot right there. One is about equipment integrity and quality and one is about being hip/cool and the social element around the product.

    I'm not anti toy camera I shoot Holga, Diana and such but the hipster movement around it is seriously irritating sometimes.
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
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  4. #24
    arealitystudios's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rich815 View Post
    Actually that tells you a whole lot right there. One is about equipment integrity and quality and one is about being hip/cool and the social element around the product.

    I'm not anti toy camera I shoot Holga, Diana and such but the hipster movement around it is seriously irritating sometimes.

    eh. It doesn't bother me at all really. It's funny... but it doesn't bother me. After all, there are a lot of products out there that are marketed as trendy and fashionable well beyond their intended function. Take wrist watches for example. I'm of the age where if you were in your early teens you absolutey had to have a Swatch wrist watch. Whether or not it could tell accurate time was irrelevent.

    Maybe it's because I do a lot of graphic design but I think the books and marketing material that come with "Lomography" products compliment the unique and quirky designs of the cameras quite well. If you take the quality of materials out of the picture the design behind a lot of toy camera products, like the LomoKino, is really quite remarkable.

    Besides, if they didn't market these items as "cool" and "hip" there is just no damn way they could compete with digital cameras.

  5. #25
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
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    I don't see toy film cameras as hipster cool. iPhones, iPads, Android phones - these are the current fads. Anything film is retro, but not hipster cool; if it were, Kodak wouldn't be on the slides, and Apple wouldn't have $120 billion in cash.

    I do admire Lomography for how they've managed to help keep film use alive. In my town, the easiest way to get 36 exposure rolls of 100 ISO color negative film is Lomo film at Urban Outfitters. Forget Fuji or Kodak at the big box stores, they only have ISO400 in 24 exposure rolls.

    I can't quite understand the film snobbery on sites like this one, and RFF, and to some extent the LF forum, where people are so vocally down on Lomography, then out of the other side of their mouths come laments about the demise of film and film cameras. You'd think people would be smart enough to figure out that film photography users need to unite forces and support whomever is making film and film equipment, Lomo included.

    ~Joe

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe VanCleave View Post
    I don't see toy film cameras as hipster cool. iPhones, iPads, Android phones - these are the current fads. Anything film is retro, but not hipster cool; if it were, Kodak wouldn't be on the slides, and Apple wouldn't have $120 billion in cash.
    ~Joe
    Hipsters and most people use photos as just a way to share there day. A photo is taken, tested or pinned or whatever is the newest thing, then forgotten. Kodak has always been about the Kodak moment-photos as lasting memories, and that isn't how the market is now. Besides, Kodak invented digital and has been one of the big gets drivers behind digital in both R&D and in products. Many digital cameras contain Kodak sensors, from your basic point and shoot up to five figure medium formats. Not only that, but they have the absolutely amazing motion picture stocks, and are the only supplier for IMAX camera and projector film.

    It wasn't hipsters that had anything to do with the demise of Kodak, it was everyone else. Screw what kind of camera you use-be it toy, LF, or digital, most everyone here and at DPUG are concerned with making lasting images, and as such, are in the minority.

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