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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    As far as the 'famous' photographers go, it seems to me that such work is often treated like 'the emperors new clothes'.
    Big +1 on that!

    Though I am most often the grumpy old man, but sometimes I get a feeling when I visit certain exhibitions, that they are hanging the artist's stuff just because it's an attractive name to announce in media, and doesn't give a damn about the quality of the work... Too often, way too often...
    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    Fact is that grainy/blurry b&w images are unusual views these days for most people, so by their unusual appearance they catch interest with the unwashed masses.

    There is a good chance that quite a few of these images are not exhibited for their artistic value but for the apparent novelty of their appearance. And I guess that is what this thread and Eric Rose's rant are all about.
    Call me unwashed, but the grainy (I rarely like blurry) b&w street images that are quite popular - when matched with the subject well - I find to have a surrealistic quality, what I mean is, the style seems to emphasize the universal event pictured, and not the particular subject pictured. There's probably a better word for it. For instance, Moriyama's Misawa makes me think about dogs in general and not that dog in particular. Gary Winogrand's Los Angeles, with the guy and gal in the convertible, makes me think the kind of city LA must be more than about the people in particular. I think if the picture were sharper and in color, it would be different.
    Bruce Davidson's color photograph Untitled, Subway, NY, 1980 of the two girls at the subway stop gets me thinking more about the story of the girls and less about the nature of subway stops.

    Thoughts? Is that just me?

  3. #23

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    Haha, I actually really like that photo. The b&w, grain and blur all make me feel like I'm there and like this is what it always feels like to be out on the road for a long time early in the morning.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by horacekenneth View Post
    Haha, I actually really like that photo. The b&w, grain and blur all make me feel like I'm there and like this is what it always feels like to be out on the road for a long time early in the morning.
    I react more on the bad exposure/development than the actual blur, even a blurry picture can indeed tell a story, but why make things worse....
    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Felinik View Post
    It looks like something that would end up in my darkroom trash bin. I guess that's why I'll never be a 'famous' photographer (and it doesn't bother me a bit).

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    It looks like something that would end up in my darkroom trash bin. I guess that's why I'll never be a 'famous' photographer (and it doesn't bother me a bit).
    That was my precise reaction (even if I only scan my negatives due to lack of time + space), but if a negative like that showed up on my screen, I'd find out how to refine my development process and not spend any time scanning that roll. If the entire roll was like that, send my camera + lens to service.
    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"

  7. #27
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    There is some artistic merit there. I'm not a huge fan of the composition, but the grain and blur make me feel disoriented, like I'm very very drunk and lost or something to that effect. Most photos leave no impression on me at all. That one did to some degree.

    Let me add, that most folks are used to seeing digitally-captured images, which are very very different than this.

  8. #28

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    I react more on the bad exposure/development than the actual blur, even a blurry picture can indeed tell a story, but why make things worse....
    Correct exposure is just getting what you intended, right? How do you know?

    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    It looks like something that would end up in my darkroom trash bin. I guess that's why I'll never be a 'famous' photographer (and it doesn't bother me a bit).
    No reason to knock the guy. The photo doesn't emotionally grab you (because of what appears to be technical errors?), no big deal, what similar genre photos do actually grab you?

    [Edit: I don't mean to say that beauty is altogether subjective, just that I think a comparison of photos would help us identify what our differences are.]
    Last edited by horacekenneth; 02-14-2013 at 11:57 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29

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    So, enough about the sample picture.

    How come the blur and the grain finds it ways into the galleries? Is this hot as cake and comparable to Instagram but in print? Is it a reaction against the perfectionism in digital photography? Or is the blur and the exposure/grain a substitute to composition skill limitations that in the end has become an artistic expression?

    When did "bad" (as in not the best achievable result) become the new cool?

    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"

  10. #30

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    I find this kind of discussion interesting since we learn that there are all sorts of opinions, but they are fairly useless in that nobody is really going to be convinced to change their current opinions. It reminds me of the time I decided to "buck the system" and complain about all of the sliver-thin DOF portrait photos where the tips of noses are OOF. That discussion didn't get anyone anywhere.

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