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  1. #41
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    I shoot film because I enjoy the entire process, from developing the negatives to making the prints. The darkroom is a place of refuge. There's a tactile component to making a print. My extremely brief foray into digital didn't give me the same feeling.
    That being said, if I were still doing commercial work, I'd be doing it digitally (I'd have to buy a camera, though). Business considerations would trump my personal preferences.
    Digital bashing makes no sense, these days. It is improving rapidly. At one time, yeah, it was vastly inferior. Those days are gone. Many people are producing fine work with their digital tools. Bashing makes those of us who choose to do our work in a darkroom look petty, as if we need justification for our personal choices.
    Fully agree, Eddie. Darkroom is a choice, and if we love what we do it will show in our work. The rest is just academic and in the grand scheme of things completely unimportant.

    Bashing doesn't do film any favors, and I agree it makes for a petty display. And the whole argument about digital having 'no soul' is just a bunch of BS. If you have ever witnessed what some of the best people printing in digital and hybrid technology can muster today, you know what I'm talking about.
    Last edited by Thomas Bertilsson; 02-26-2014 at 10:12 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #42

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    I thought Forma still did plates?

  3. #43

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    I use both for what they are. Which do I prefer? Film, but digital has it's place, from my iphone to my dslr. I usually use my dslr for posting stuff to ebay or checking flash light setup, kind of like polaroid. Maybe only 1% of the digital shots are something that I would consider final image. Another use is high iso colour.

    Otherwise, my hasselblad and 35mm pentax SLR go with me everywhere. Even overseas. The dslr usually stays behind back home...

  4. #44
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    [...]And the whole argument about digital having 'no soul' is just a bunch of BS. If you have ever witnessed what some of the best people printing in digital and hybrid technology can muster today, you know what I'm talking about.
    Absolutely!!
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  5. #45
    BradS's Avatar
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    I didn't click on the link in the OP but, as I told the little old lady who asked me "why are you still using film?!?!?", because a camera without film is kinda useless. I guess it could be useful for beating somebody over the head....

  6. #46

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    I would like to add a comment to the discussion, nothing to do with what I prefer or which is better than which, but I just find it amusing to see plug-ins to make digital images look like film, black and white films with some rocket science type of grain, so it is so fine it almost looks like a digital image, again black and white film that is black and white but it´s developed in C-41 and does not have any silver in the final image, C-41 color films that have totally random colors (redbird and the like...), cameras with plastic lenses instead of glass. It just appears to me that in photography people value very much the purity and the craft of of their processes, but at the same time we really can´t keep what we have in a simple state. For some reason we have to shuffle everything up and make a mix. Honestly at times it gets very confusing, especially for somebody who is starting and wants to find its own way, but again, this is only a feeling I have, not a preference or prejudice of any sort. I think the fewer, simpler tools we have, the more we can concentrate on the originality of our creations.

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by mauro35 View Post
    It just appears to me that in photography people value very much the purity and the craft of of their processes, but at the same time we really can´t keep what we have in a simple state. For some reason we have to shuffle everything up and make a mix.
    It's probably not the same people using all those divergent tools, though. At a guess, most people with film in their toolbox will use real film by preference over faux-film digital processes; and I bet there aren't too many people working seriously with both ultra-fine-grain b&w films and the "redscale" stuff.

    I think the fewer, simpler tools we have, the more we can concentrate on the originality of our creations.
    I'm of two minds. A diversity of tools can be a distraction, sure, but on the other hand, tools are fun. And somebody else having access to some wacky tool or process, even if it's one that I think is kind of stupid, doesn't actually hurt me any.

    I think I'd rather have a rich ecosystem of analog and digital and hybrid stuff, and have to exercise some self-discipline to keep myself focussed, than be more tightly constrained by the marketplace.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  8. #48

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    [QUOTE]#I think I'd rather have a rich ecosystem of analog and digital and hybrid stuff, and have to exercise some self-discipline to keep myself focussed, than be more tightly constrained by the marketplace.#

    Completely agree that we need to exercise self-discipline, absolutely an essential step for an artistic creation. In my personal artistic growth (hopefully I' ll keep growing) I find that I can force myself to be very creative when somehow contrained (as my own choice) by few, simple and straightforward tools. Limitations can make imagination flourish. In the beginning it was all about trying all kinds of lenses, films, apertures, settings. Now I'm sometimes surprised how much I can improve using the same classic tools everytime. I guess it's part of a process and seeing so many alternatives and options of all sorts can be an initial load of positive stimuli to try and find out what we really like, if we can stay focused.

  9. #49

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    In my youth I discovered the Oulipo, a group of mostly French (inevitably) writers, the marquee members being Raymond Queneau, Georges Perec, and Italo Calvino, who did a lot of experimentation with highly constrained creative work. The signal example is Perec's _La Disparition_, an entire novel written without using the letter 'e'---in FRENCH! (There's an English translation under the title _A Void_; it's not *the* most readable book in the world, but it must be easily the most readable book in the world that omits the most common letter.) A lot of their ideas about constraints apply just as well to photography, and many of them are actually pretty normal practices; how many people shoot all their landscapes without people in the frame, or preach "one camera one lens one film", for instance?

    Without meaning to get *too* goofy and philosophical, I think those folks are onto something, in that working within constraints is a good way to find things you didn't know you could do. So I think it's valuable to *have* the letter 'e' available, so to speak, but that doesn't mean you always have to use it, or even that everybody has to use it at all. (I think serious wildlife photography without digital is just about the equivalent of writing without the letter 'e'---and there are people who do a terrific job at it, but man, I lose my analog principles in a hurry when trying to chase hummingbirds around.)

    As a classmate of mine rather wonderfully said once, "It's not an either/and, it's a both/or."

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  10. #50

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    I saw this post over Photo.net and found it very funny

    "I'm taking a photography class in HS and I'm really into it, especially film. My pictures, however, when they're printed traditionally on B&W photo paper don't appear have the 'film look' to them, or at least that's what it looks like.
    Is it something that has to do with the contrast? or possibly the (cheapy) film and/or paper? The Exposure?

    I'm using a Konica Autoreflex TC with the Standard Hexanon 50mm f1.7 lens. The film is both 100 and 400 ASA Arista EDU Ultra. The Paper is RC VC Arista as well.

    Thanks in advance for the help."

    So it looks like we have to define the film look.

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