Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,558   Posts: 1,545,231   Online: 883
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    492

    What is "tonality"

    I hear a lot of comments about "tonality" of black and white films. What does "tonality" mean?

  2. #2
    baachitraka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bremen, Germany.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,371
    Something that we see in between textured blacks and textured whites in prints.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    492
    Quote Originally Posted by baachitraka View Post
    Something that we see in between textured blacks and textured whites in prints.
    I realize my reply is a bit flippant, but do you mean gray?

    Or more seriously, what aspect of the in-between grays constitute tonality?

  4. #4
    Light Guru's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    112

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    168
    Catch-all phrase for the range, key and contrast of a print. It's faster to say "that photographer uses a distinctive tonality" than "that photographer uses a distinctive range, key and contrast range."

    Many Karsh portraits http://121clicks.com/wp-content/uplo...f_karsh_01.jpg are low key, high contrast, that is their tonality. As an example.

    So yeah, like alanrockwood said, all that stuff between black and white

  6. #6
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,734
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    It is used to describe the transition of/between/across tones, whether gray or colored.

    The usage of the word "tonality" is often just jargon because it is regularly used in an undefined manner.

    For example, "The tonality of the print from a 4x5 negative has better tonality than a print from 35mm film". How it is "better" is not defined in that sentence so in that case it's just jargon.

    Conversely in these examples, "The tonality of slow films is smoother than that of fast films" or "I like the rough tonality that small, pushed, fast film negatives bring to my street photography" we actually get an idea that our brains can understand.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #7
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    728
    Images
    21
    It describes the range of tones that can be realized between the extremes of black and white. Although this comparison is a quite flawed, I would explain it with the help of computer technology. Early computers only were able to display 8 different colors, which is a rather "bad" tonality". Later they had 32, 64, 256 colors and then millions, so the tonality became more differentiated.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,752
    The "tonality" of a film is it's characteristic curve in a given process. It is how the film will render a range of subject luminance values. However it is only one step in the end-to-end series of "translations" from subject to print. Most current films have similar characteristic curves within a normal range, so the inherent "tonalities" of most films are virtually the same for subjects with normal contrast ranges. Extreme highlights can be substantially different though, and different films might respond differently to changes in developer and processing.

  9. #9
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,326
    Images
    343
    I would suggest it is a significant variance of shades between black and white to suit the subject in question.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  10. #10
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,734
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Michael I agree that the film curve is one representation of the tonality.

    I do think that another dimension of tonality is related to print magnification.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin