Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,914   Posts: 1,521,726   Online: 1070
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    near Ottawa, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    215
    One of the studios I work for uses a DSLR for previewing the lighting during commercial shoots. The photographer actually shoots through the 4x5 (back and lens removed) to get a fairly accurate idea of the lighting. Helps immensly to correct hot spots, unwanted shadows, points of tension, etc. Especially during the more intense product shoots, it saves a LOT of polaroids. Nevertheless, for checking the DoF, camera and lens settings, he still does a final Polaroid; but for everything else, viewing a digital preview on the laptop beats the polaroid hands down.
    [SIZE=1]Tiptoeing through life's grand theater - and falling down flat.[/SIZE]

  2. #12
    Antje's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Near Erlangen, Germany
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    478
    Images
    3
    I even use mine as a light meter.

    Antje

  3. #13
    darinwc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,038
    Images
    157
    I really enjoy using my digicam to preview composition. However it is not a flawless system. The screens tend to be high-contrast and the chips are not very sensitive in low light. Size does make a difference. One of my shots with 35mm went unnoticed for a year because I was only loooking at the negative and contact proof. Turned out to be one I received an award of merrit for in the state fair.
    One time I brought a little 3mp digicam with a small screen with me.. I was in the mopnterey area and took some photos of the 'lone pine'. The digicam pic turned out better than the LF ones.
    So... my advice is if you use any type of small format for research, make sure you have the options to see it full size and reshoot before you leave the area.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    30

    what factors are involved in using a DSLR to proof nighttime shots

    I've used a DLSR to check exposure and lighting on Medium format shoots, but I was wondering about using them for LF nighttime shooting, for example if i set the DSLR to f2.8 at 20 sec, what would I set the LF too, is there a scale factor invloved, also on long exposures the DLSR doesn't suffer Reciprocity failure, whereas the film will, again is there a factor to figured i to account for this?

    Throwing it out there, as I'm sure someone here will have the answers, before I go off shooting loads of black film!

    Cheers

  5. #15
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by freespirit67 View Post
    I've used a DLSR to check exposure and lighting on Medium format shoots, but I was wondering about using them for LF nighttime shooting, for example if i set the DSLR to f2.8 at 20 sec, what would I set the LF too, is there a scale factor invloved, also on long exposures the DLSR doesn't suffer Reciprocity failure, whereas the film will, again is there a factor to figured i to account for this?

    Throwing it out there, as I'm sure someone here will have the answers, before I go off shooting loads of black film!

    Cheers
    The exposure would be exactly the same regardless of format, though the DOF and FOV obviously would differ. The reciprocity issue would have to be tackled separately. I simply download the reciprocity charts for my favourite films to my cell phone.

    I sometimes spot meter with my DSLR. A DSLR makes a very nice exposure proofing system, because the exposure latitude is crap... (compared to b&w film, at least!)
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  6. #16
    roteague's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, Hawaii
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,672
    Images
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by freespirit67 View Post
    I've used a DLSR to check exposure and lighting on Medium format shoots,
    One of the problems with using a DSLR as a light meter is the difference in sensitivity of the highlights. Film can resolve much more in the hightlights than a digital camera can, and can have a much more limited range as well (for B&W). This could lead one to misjudge the exposure; the digital might show blown highlights, where film could resolve something in it. Additionally, some digital cameras - especially Nikon's - lean towards underexposure. Not a real problem with B&W but a potential big problem with color transparencies.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin