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  1. #11

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    I've used a lot of HIE throughout the year here in the uk. I like it for the more less obvious IR image. Soft lighting is ok, buildings, stonework etc. Have a look at my website. Good luck.

  2. #12
    SAShruby's Avatar
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    Any scene that have different surface heat will be a good candidate for your pictures. With relation to lanscapes trees or any photosynthesis acting plant will generate heat, that is why you see it white.

    You need to use your own imagination to find items for still life pictures as long as they can generate the heat.

    Cheers.
    Peter Hruby
    LF Silver Photography

  3. #13
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAShruby View Post
    Any scene that have different surface heat will be a good candidate for your pictures. With relation to lanscapes trees or any photosynthesis acting plant will generate heat, that is why you see it white.

    You need to use your own imagination to find items for still life pictures as long as they can generate the heat.

    Cheers.
    I feel sure that heat is not a requirement for infrared film. I've not come across a hot leaf yet; although I accept that there's still time - at least I hope there is!

    I was privileged to view many infrared images last night at the EMMG by Barry Freeman, and was most impressed by his building interiors shot on this medium.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by SAShruby View Post
    Any scene that have different surface heat will be a good candidate for your pictures. With relation to lanscapes trees or any photosynthesis acting plant will generate heat, that is why you see it white.

    You need to use your own imagination to find items for still life pictures as long as they can generate the heat.

    Cheers.
    You're not really seeing the thermal IR part of the spectrum in your kodak HIE images. Thermal infrared involves much longer wavelengths (far IR) that this film simply isn't sensitive to. I think HIE drops off in sensitivity somewhere in the mid 900nm range, which is in the near-IR range. In the grand scheme of EM radiation it's practically visible light.

    What you're seeing is infrared radiation (and a bit of visible, depending on your filter) sent out by the sun and reflected by objects - just like regular old visible light in your regular film images. Leaves glow the way they do because they happen to reflect a lot of IR, which we normally can't see. They don't reflect as much in the visible range because they use light in those wavelengths for photosynthesis; they suck it up, so to speak, and use the energy to make sugar for themselves. The useless infrared just bounces off, unhindered by photosynthetic pigments.
    Last edited by walter23; 07-05-2007 at 02:46 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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  5. #15
    ben-s's Avatar
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    Dave and Walter are correct.
    One common use of IR film was to survey large areas of forest from the air.
    The images will show healthy live areas as white, and dead or diseased areas as grey or black.
    This stuff is mainly done digitally now.
    Lens caps and cable releases can become invisible at will. :D

  6. #16
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    HIE

    HIE has alot of visual response. With no filter or a red filter it looks in a VERY general sense like common b/w film. (I can't compare to anything specific).

    Data sheet
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/f13/f13.pdf
    confirms response up to about 900 nm.

    I just figured it was a waste to use it for other than its unique properties like Wood Effect.

    I had read somewhere that some effect is visible if items are 'illuminated' with a pair of clothes irons (no steam!) at close range, but that just sound like too much nuisance to me, as well as fire hazard. (No tripod mount on the irons :O) )
    Murray

  7. #17
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by walter23 View Post
    You're not really seeing the thermal IR part of the spectrum in your kodak HIE images. Thermal infrared involves much longer wavelengths (far IR) that this film simply isn't sensitive to. I think HIE drops off in sensitivity somewhere in the mid 900nm range, which is in the near-IR range. In the grand scheme of EM radiation it's practically visible light.
    The human body heat shows up around the 10 to 15 micron range [10,000nm to 15,000nm] well beyond the range of IR film.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #18
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Try cross processing EIR and then printing it. Or print it using the Sabattier effect. Spooky.

    PE

  9. #19
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Murray@uptowngallery View Post
    I had read somewhere that some effect is visible if items are 'illuminated' with a pair of clothes irons (no steam!) at close range, but that just sound like too much nuisance to me, as well as fire hazard. (No tripod mount on the irons :O) )


    This story of the heated cloth iron, even without cloth, is so old that it already in literature from the seventies was stated as a tale.

    Walter already hinted at that infrared photography based on halide materials is mainly about recording differences in IR-reflection. Not about recording of differences of IR-radiance due to temperature differences.

    Objects with a temperature higher than 525°C have a visually different appearance (glow). Objects with temperatures below 250°C would have to be exposed unfeasibly long on IR-films. (By the way, the maximum temperature of a cloth iron is something of 230°C...). I have seen a photograph of a heated solding iron, but still exposed extremely long.

    The Wood effect (R.W. Wood) is nothing but a vast overexposure of leaves combined with a blocking of the rest of the object by means of an IR-filter. That overexposure is due to the reflection of IR-radition (typically from the sun) of the leaves. The lowerside of leaves is highly reflective (like snow etc.) but is covered with clorophyll with a high absorbtion in the visible spectrum (bands at 450 and 670nm), thus acting as an IR- filter. This reflection is dependend on the sort, the vegetation period, but also on the health of a tree. (Also think of autumn colours.)

    Fields of scientic/commercial use are/were agriculture, medicine, forensic, history of arts.

    Concerning aero survey: there are a lot of very small businesses in that field who are not likely to change to a camera system based on digitally recording due to the inherent investments. Those will remain using film.
    Last edited by AgX; 07-05-2007 at 08:45 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    OK . the tale is put to rest. Thank you.
    Murray

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