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  1. #11

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    I have a book with something about photojournalism in the title that featured work by her and Mary Ellen Mark. It was done well over 30 years ago when Liebovitz was the first staff photographer for Rolling Stone. At the time, Annie's photos were considered exciting because Rolling Stone was one of the few magazines highlighting rock and roll and alternate culture and the celebrities spawned by these phenomena. Now, as I look back on it, it was typical celeb photography. Later, I subscribed to Vanity Fair and saw more of her work and never thought it was distinguished from the adequate in any way. I think she was an early-on papparazzi (I have no idea how that is supposed to be spelled) which got her recognition and led to her rising to her current level of incompetence (if anyone remembers that theory). I have not seen "A Photographer's Life".

    When I first got the book I mentioned, I remember being impressed with Mary Ellen Mark's range of work much moreso than Liebovitz's. These days, I can't imagine Mark and Liebovitz being considered together in any respect.

  2. #12
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    Her approach, I think, mirrors that of Arthur Fellig (Weegee), who documented NYC's less trendy denizens: viz, "f/11 and bein' there."
    That sum's her up, to me.

    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  3. #13
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    I agree about Mary Ellen Mark. So much more depth there, IMO, and not dependent on the fame of the subject. I appreciate a photographer whose work says something.

  4. #14
    lee
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    I don't think Mary Ellen Mark and Annie Liebovitz should be compared. Anne is an editorial photographer and Mary Ellen is a documentary photographer. They both are women and they both use cameras for a living but there the comparison ends as I see it.

    lee\c

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuzanneR View Post
    Her work was discussed at length, here, but I can't find the thread to link.
    Here are the threads :

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum56/3...music-dia.html

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum56/3...hers-life.html
    Don Bryant

  6. #16

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    I had a friend who assisted her at one time. She went in with alot of respect for her and come out with absolutely none. The assistants do everything and she comes in and presses the shutter. At least thats what I was told by someone who worked for her briefly before walking out.

  7. #17
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    It has been touched upon many times before, but her assistants do all the work from what some assistants who I have met have told me. I saw the actual prints from this book in person and even my girlfriend was picking them apart, which is pretty bad since she doesn't know much about photography. I don't think she does much original work and if you replaced the celebrities in her images with normal people who would care? Compare her images to Avedon's western portraits.

    She just seems hollow and a fake to me. Amoungst my friends she is referred to as Lieboshitz. But what the hell do I know. I can't take a picture either.

    Patrick

  8. #18
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    It is always easier to judge than be judged.
    IMHO - Constructive criticism requires assessment and understanding of one's own interpretation of the given subject, with a pinch elegance.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheryl Jacobs View Post
    Just curious what older stuff you're referring to. Do you mean her early Rolling Stone work?

    Yeah, I'm a sucker for that particular era of rock and roll and the images associated with it.
    Kick his ass, Sea Bass!

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole View Post
    It is always easier to judge than be judged.
    IMHO - Constructive criticism requires assessment and understanding of one's own interpretation of the given subject, with a pinch elegance.
    The time for Liebovitz to receive constructive criticism was about 30 years ago when someone she respected and who knew a thing or two about photography could have told her that shooting pictures of famous people would never win her respect as an artist, merely as an opportunist.

    We APUGers all indulge in criticism of all kinds of photographers. The more famous they are, the less we probably feel obligated to use a "pinch of elegance". Since A.L. has risen to the status of having as much shelf real estate as she does in bookstores, then let her be judged alongside Cartier Bresson, Dorothea Lange, Arnold Newman, Margaret Bourke-White, etc.
    Robert Hunt

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