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  1. #11
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    Nicolai, I like the work you are doing. If I was going to compare it to an art movement I would say it looks impressionist.

  2. #12
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    How about Robert Rauschenberg himself. I like his photograhy though it is more abstract seeing than presenting.

    A 50s photographer that did beautiful swirling abstract work with lights in water was Ralph Eugene Meatyard. Used a Rollei.

  3. #13

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    Abstract Expressionism did not die on the vine in the 50's and 60's as many art historian like to tell us. My champion, of the group, was Robert Motherwell. I was creating texture and color based images that my college prof told me were "nothing of worth." Then I walked into a museum and saw "Ellegy to the Spanish Republic" by Motherwell. His example confirmed to me, I was on to something. His example inspires my work to this day. And Motherwell was cranking out fantastic work right up until his death in 1991. As he said in the PBS documentary on his life, "The Citadel has not fallen." I have attached one of my "nothing of worth" abstractions.

    Walker
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails LIC-101.jpg  

  4. #14
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    I think a lot of Man Rays work would fall into this catagorey.

  5. #15
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    I may be stepping in over my head here but I do not see how a camera/photographer can 'abstract' anything. At most the camera can 'isolate' but not take apart and put together in
    another way as seems to be meant by abstract.

    The pictures we see in the APUG galleries that are called abstract seem really to be a single, isolated segment of a larger subject.

    I know painters and writers can abstract but can the photographer/artist?

  6. #16

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    hi bruce

    strangely enough, i think that most photographs are an abstraction of one
    sort or another. black and white images convert whatever imagery into
    something devoid of colors, like most people see -
    ( and i would guess that people's brain interpret colors differently as well )
    dof, perspective, lens choice, film, paper, processing and printing techniques ( et C. )
    distort reality ... few photographs are pure form and line and color, like
    an abstract expressionist painting,
    or
    black and white, line and form (isolating something from the original context)
    like a siskind photograph.

    ... but to me at least, rearranging reality, and putting it on a piece of paper
    seems to me to be more abstract, than "realism" ...
    but kind of like the "cut up poetry" tristan tzara was doing as a dadaist, or surrealist ...

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    nicolai,
    great stuff!

    john

  7. #17
    papagene's Avatar
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    I don't know how much or if at all Brett Weston was influenced by the Abstract Expressionists, but I find in his work many compositional similarities to both Motherwell and Kline. This is one of the main reasons I have always liked his work. I am drawn to Brett's work more than that of his father's, who I also like very much.
    Motherwell and Kline were a couple of my artistic heroes when I was young art student many years ago.

    gene
    gene LaFord


    Long live Ed "Big Daddy" Roth!!
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  8. #18
    Sparky's Avatar
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    I fully agree with John on a camera as an 'abtracting device' - a photograph ALWAYS removes something from it's original context, IMO. However - I think that "abstract expressionism" is a bit different than this in intent. To suggest otherwise would, IMO, be a misunderstanding of it. The word "abstract" is an adverb of "expressionism". So - the idea is about "isolating gestures" the way I see it at least.

  9. #19
    Sparky's Avatar
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    Also - I found out i'd misspoke on Ray K. (metzger) - he was actually much earlier than I thought. I think I was thinking of his 'mathematics' series. Though I can't seem to find a repro online.Check your copies of Jonathan Green's American Photography to see it - if anyone's got it (excellent intro book!)

  10. #20
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    I don't know how much or if at all Brett Weston was influenced by the Abstract Expressionists, but I find in his work many compositional similarities to both Motherwell and Kline. This is one of the main reasons I have always liked his work. I am drawn to Brett's work more than that of his father's, who I also like very much.
    I agree with Gene, that's why I started this thread, in one of my older magazines, which I can't seem to find right now, Brett Weston was described as an Abstract Expressionist. I have only seen that reference once and was interested in seeing if any other photographers had gained that description.

    I came across a new book, to me, on Edward Weston, that is a completely new light on the man and his family background. It's called Edward Weston: A Photographer's Love of Life. It's really heavy, very well printed and the text is fantastic with red references in quotes from the Daybooks. This is a rather large book, heavy to hold but loaded with photographs I haven't seen before.

    Curt
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

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