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  1. #11
    keithwms's Avatar
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    It's a wondeful, thoughtful painting, in my opinion.

    I do have a question for art historians: how much colour drift might one expect from the paints he used? As far as tone scale is concerned, I see no un-reality in the separate halves, but joining them together is problematic. The shadowing suggests a sunrise and hence one expects a rather different blue in the sky- a different colour temperature. Hence I ask whether that blue is the same blue he saw when he put it to canvas.

    Regardless of colour temperature, I do enjoy it as a study of unusual contrast in light and statement on how inside light is used.

    The idea that comes to me is that a person-secluded in the house, with the light on and perhaps reading a book- is oblivious to the scene unfolding outside. I think the painter wants to suggest that this person is missing the bigger show, so to speak. I get the strong idea of confinement inside the house, versus blinding beauty outside.

    Actually, this strikes me as the least surreal of the Magritte work I have seen.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  2. #12
    arigram's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    The idea that comes to me is that a person-secluded in the house, with the light on and perhaps reading a book- is oblivious to the scene unfolding outside. I think the painter wants to suggest that this person is missing the bigger show, so to speak. I get the strong idea of confinement inside the house, versus blinding beauty outside.
    Ha, I didn't see it as being that complex.
    Its simply a day sky with a night landscape mixed together and the "disturbing" part is that they are combined very naturally in a way that many people would totally miss the unnatural phenomenon.
    The existence of day and night together would be something that wouldn't register in most people's minds.
    So, I can't see it as "HDR" or very well developed shadow detail.
    Photographically is a montage of two separate frames.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
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  3. #13
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sun of sand View Post
    I might ask you why it is/seems you're trying to belittle me
    It takes two to tango. Aren't you the one trying to belittle me as an artsy-fartsy who is bowled over by complex theories?
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  4. #14
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Well, if you guys are going to keep fuming then I am going to post this album cover, which I just learned from Wikipedia was inspired by the Magritte.

    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  5. #15
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arigram View Post
    So, I can't see it as "HDR" or very well developed shadow detail.
    Photographically is a montage of two separate frames.
    I see the relationship to photography as a negative one: a kind of bras d'honneur of painting towards the limitations of photography. Manet also did a few paintings that went against the laws of optics to prove the point that painting had abilities beyond what the camera could do.

    So there is the representation of the impossible, or the fictive, implicitly in opposition to the common perception of photography as an art petrified in the here and there. Other Magritte paintings, like the pipe, the painter creating a woman, or the apples, are representations of the impossible, but I think it's the use of light to represent impossibility that makes the painting more relevant to photography.

    Magritte is drawing with light, but what's more he is drawing light itself, and having a ball doing so.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  6. #16
    arigram's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    I see the relationship to photography as a negative one: a kind of bras d'honneur of painting towards the limitations of photography. Manet also did a few paintings that went against the laws of optics to prove the point that painting had abilities beyond what the camera could do.

    So there is the representation of the impossible, or the fictive, implicitly in opposition to the common perception of photography as an art petrified in the here and there. Other Magritte paintings, like the pipe, the painter creating a woman, or the apples, are representations of the impossible, but I think it's the use of light to represent impossibility that makes the painting more relevant to photography.

    Magritte is drawing with light, but what's more he is drawing light itself, and having a ball doing so.
    I agree, to go past, nay, to defeat realism was his and the other surrealists' goal.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
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  7. #17
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post

    The idea that comes to me is that a person-secluded in the house, with the light on and perhaps reading a book- is oblivious to the scene unfolding outside. I think the painter wants to suggest that this person is missing the bigger show, so to speak. I get the strong idea of confinement inside the house, versus blinding beauty outside.
    Keith, I really like that interpretation. I forgot about the light in the second floor windows.

    It's a bit like the 4am time, when night eventually turns into day, but for a while we keep the electric lights on until the morning is clear enough to pierce through the windows.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  8. #18
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arigram View Post
    I agree, to go past, nay, to defeat realism was his and the other surrealists' goal.
    The Surrealists' relationship to photography is all the more interesting. I'm not sure if my interpretation of this painting toward photo is accurate, but I would not be surprised to see these people having very ambivalent feelings toward the silver plate.

    Man Ray of course comes to mind as someone who was trying to defeat realism in photography; Magritte took a few photos as well; Dali was obviously a great subject for a photographer.

    Conversely, I was struck, but ultimately not surprised to know that Cartier-Bresson was drawing his inspiration from the surrealists in his manner of composing.

    I think everyone must have realized at some point that the camera was seeing something more, or something else than plain reality.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  9. #19
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    Conversely, I was struck, but ultimately not surprised to know that Cartier-Bresson was drawing his inspiration from the surrealists in his manner of composing.
    Indeed it's not as clear as Kertesz.

    I don't think I've ever seen any of HCB's paintings; this makes me curious.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  10. #20
    arigram's Avatar
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    A photograph is by its very nature surrealistic:
    A picture of a pipe "is not a pipe", after all.

    I remember how at the university I used Plato's argument against art (that creates lies because of the artists' lack of knowledge)
    to support modern art that went against naturalism and realism.

    Cartier-Bresson's work is very surrealistic in the sense that although it draws from the physical reality,
    its compositional and presentational aspects slightly escape from the normal perception enough to give
    the necessary nudge towards irrationality.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




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