Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,709   Posts: 1,548,618   Online: 1153
      
Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678910 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 94
  1. #51

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Oxfordshire, UK.
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,215
    In moving toward art, I think that technique is fluid and ever changing - not least because new materials are introduced and old ones are discontinued. But I do think it's possible to move from equipment to art and my experience is that once I stopped thinking that new stuff = better photos and rather started concentrating on getting the best out of what I had, I was able to become much more confident and perhaps even relegate technique and focus upon artistic form.
    Steve.

  2. #52
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,758
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    I know it may be considered heresy, but it is important to remember that once we define the art we want to make (the product we expect), the craft of photography becomes nothing more than a means to an end, part of an assembly line, the creation of "lucky accidents" over and over again.

    Weston had a style, Adams had a style, Picasso, Rembrandt, etcetera all defined a style then worked within it.

    Wedding and portrait photographers do this all the time. In a given situation they do a, b, c and d and it works every time.

    Example-
    a - backlight your subject against a late afternoon sky
    b - have them kiss or spin or whatever or just wait for "the moment"
    c - shoot 400 speed C-41 film at 400 and f4
    d - send it to the lab

    (this a,b,c,d process is essentially Henri Cartier-Bresson's process)

    If a wedding shooter has 8 or 10 of these setups, that is all the craft they need to know to reliably produce a very artistic product. There is no need for thought about the craft or process or style or DOF or blur, camera work becomes all about the composition and posing. For most setup's you don't even need a meter.

    It doesn't require sticking with or knowing "just one film", Fuji and Kodak become fully interchangeable as does color and B&W, heck consumer films like Superia and Gold will work just fine in a pinch.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #53
    stradibarrius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Monroe, GA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,382
    Images
    163
    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    I get what you are saying, but the way I see it, the amount of technique one needs to learn in order to get started with expressing concepts with the camera is minimal; much, much, much more minimal than almost any other artistic medium, IMO. The basic techniques take about a day to explain to a group of students (composing, how shutter speeds and apertures affect the picture, exposure, how light meters work and how to use them, focusing, depth of field). Then it is just a little practice, and you can start expressing concepts visually. The great (and terrible) thing about photography is that you can do a whole lot with it if you have just a little bit of very basic information.

    So, I think there is an initial technical hurdle that takes just a little bit of understanding and practice, but after that, most of the visual vocabulary is complete, and there are just bits and pieces to learn as you go on practicing.

    I believe "artistry" is mainly something that is a characteristic of a person, and has little to do with medium or technique. These things simply hone and focus ones artistry. I don't think that you can become an artist just because you start using a medium that is used for making art.
    I think you are right. It takes less to get "started" of course there is mountains to learn about the equipment.
    I have met guitar players that really don't care much about the "gear". They will have a preference, say a Fender over a Gibson but beyond that they just want to play and they will rock you back on your heels. Other players want to know every thing they can, theoretical as well as pratical some care really play and some are just gear guys. I think to your point 2F/2F, the artistry comes from the person obviously and not the gear. When I first started I thought that photography was more about learning to use the camera, lights, film and then you would be good but like everything else artistic, it comes from the inside of the person behind the camera. We can be gear chasers, but still not be a photographer. From another thread here I discovered Ralph Gibson and really like his work. According to what I read he only used a Leica and primes and it seems mostly available light so his gear and set up were not overly complicated but what results!
    I am afraid that I have gained a fair amount of technical knowledge but lack the real vision that I want? Is that the way many of you feel as well?
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
    Flicker http://www.flickr.com/photos/stradibarrius
    website: http://www.dudleyviolins.com
    Barry
    Monroe, GA

  4. #54
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,758
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by stradibarrius View Post
    I am afraid that I have gained a fair amount of technical knowledge but lack the real vision that I want?
    I don't know If I'd put it that way.

    I would say I haven't finished defining my style.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #55

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Sub 35mm
    Posts
    16,412
    Blog Entries
    2
    thanks ian
    that explains a lot ..

    john

  6. #56
    Ian Leake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,363
    Images
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by stradibarrius View Post
    I am afraid that I have gained a fair amount of technical knowledge but lack the real vision that I want
    You could always try the traditional way: copy pictures. (I don't mean copy and pass off as your own, of course.) Choose a picture, study it for a while (5 or 10 minutes, perhaps more), ask yourself why it works and what it is that appeals to you, then make your own version. Repeat.

    At some point you'll find that you prefer your versions to the originals, and you'll find your own style emerging. (Don't be disheartened if you don't reach this place for a while.) When you start to feel that you're exploring something important then repeat the exercise, but using your pictures as the starting point.

    Don't limit yourself to photographs as inspiration. Look at some paintings or sculptures. Look at architecture and design. Look at the people around you. Look at clouds (Stieglitz's Equivalents). Do something daring that pushes you right outside your comfort zone. Stop listening to people who say that you're doing it wrong - if it feels right to you then it's right. Keep exploring.

  7. #57

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    I wouldn't recommend the copy-cat school.

    You get, perhaps not quicker, but more direct to where you want to be if you ponder for as long as it takes what it is you want to do using photography. And why photography?
    Keep exploring, yes. But explore that, before even thinking about using a camera, i'd say.

    Trying to find out what that something important is is much better than waiting for the moment you stumble across it while doing what not you, but other people do/did/have done.

  8. #58
    Ian Leake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,363
    Images
    48
    All art is experiential - i.e. you can only understand it by experiencing it. This is true regardless of whether you are making it or are in the audience. In other words you've got to do it to learn it. And making art is exploratory. When you're exploring then, by definition, you can't know where you're going before you start. The best you can do is work out a plan for exploring efficiently and effectively. Then you have to start your exploration - and that means making pictures.

  9. #59
    stradibarrius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Monroe, GA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,382
    Images
    163
    The suggestion of selecting others work that appeals to me and try to understand "why" I like seems as though it would help me decide what "my style" is or at least a point from which to start.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
    Flicker http://www.flickr.com/photos/stradibarrius
    website: http://www.dudleyviolins.com
    Barry
    Monroe, GA

  10. #60
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,289
    Images
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    I wouldn't recommend the copy-cat school.

    You get, perhaps not quicker, but more direct to where you want to be if you ponder for as long as it takes what it is you want to do using photography. And why photography?
    Keep exploring, yes. But explore that, before even thinking about using a camera, i'd say.

    Trying to find out what that something important is is much better than waiting for the moment you stumble across it while doing what not you, but other people do/did/have done.
    Back in the 80's I went on a workshop with Paul Hill at Duckspool,.

    A rather wealthy photographer (heir to the family fortune, had never worked) showed an immaculate portfolio, the pints were fantastic quality & composition except there was nothing of him in the images. He'd done one Ansel Adams style, another Cartier Bresson and so on, he was torn to shteds.

    Photography (or any art form) is all about achieving your own personal style.

    Ian



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin