Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,827   Posts: 1,582,084   Online: 909
      
Page 9 of 10 FirstFirst ... 345678910 LastLast
Results 81 to 90 of 95
  1. #81

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,126
    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    I don't think "great artists" do any one thing universally.
    Where in my post do you see the phrase "all great artists"?
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #82
    Tony Egan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,137
    Images
    69
    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    Something odd about dissing traditionalists on APUG...
    Likes:
    The expression "all mouth and no trousers" (I believe one American translation is something like "all hat and no cattle")
    http://www.tonyeganphotography.com/index.html
    "Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others." Groucho Marx

  3. #83
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,752
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Where in my post do you see the phrase "all great artists"?
    Not there. But that is how it reads.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  4. #84

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,083
    Gerald is pretty correct on this, and it is that way in most of the arts and sciences. Music has some excellent examples. Generally the greatest creative minds recognize the beauty and importance of great work that came before them, even if they themselves are forward thinkers.

  5. #85
    Roger Thoms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    San Francisco, CA USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    857
    Images
    7
    I just rediscovered a real photographic turn off, dead battery, and no spare, real turn off for sure.

    Roger

  6. #86
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    There is a perfectly reasonable contrary view, though, Michael, that too much emphasis on appreciation and critical study of what others have done can really fill up a curriculum and leave little time for tinkering. If you look at how all the great artists and scientists developed, I think you'll find that all of them experimented in a lot of different directions. That takes time. In classical music, it is widely accepted that one cannot be a composer and a performer (or critic)... it really takes full effort to accomplish one or the other. And we need both, of course.

    Even in the physical sciences (my area), in which you'd think that standing on the shoulders of others is the best way to see forward, i.e. through incremental progress, this can be a real issue. As a teacher, I think we have gone waaay to far from experimentalism and learning through direct experience. The result is a generation of students who can google anything but who are terrified of venturing their own attempt at damn near anything. Education has become so 2-dimensional and dry. No seeds for innovation.

    There is a beautiful quote by Giaever in his Nobel lecture that goes something like this: I am very fortunate not to have known all the good reasons why I shouldn't have done these experiments. In other words, the prevailing theories suggested that his work wasn't worth doing. But he was "dumb" enough to do them and the results were remarkable.

    Obviously balance is always good. Everybody needs the basic schooling and guidance. But I really think that throughout academics, right across the spectrum including arts and science, there isn't nearly enough experimentalism.

    I got a bit off the topic, but those are my sincere convictions as a teacher.
    Last edited by keithwms; 05-30-2011 at 04:41 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  7. #87

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,083
    I don't disagree. Experimentation is critical. But there is a fine line for me I guess. When lomographers, people burning holes in their paper negatives, or purposely using expired materials, or the worst lens they can find, or no lens at all, tell me "Ansel sucks", I have a hard time taking them seriously.

  8. #88
    David Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    near Dallas, TX USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,341
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    In classical music, it is widely accepted that one cannot be a composer and a performer (or critic)...

    Even in the physical sciences (my area), ...
    Respectfully disagree.

    In my area, music (this photography thing is just a hobby) I don't think this is "widely accepted" at all. There are certainly examples to the contrary from every age: Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Listz, Bernstein - the list goes on and on.

  9. #89
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    David, it's true that these are notably great performers and composers. I was thinking more of today's craft when I wrote that- the repertoire is so large and challenging now that it'd be very hard to accomplish both. And it's hard to get the sponsorship of a king or queen now Anyway, you're right, that was an inaccurate generalization on my part.

    Michael, I agree and I think different for its own sake isn't terribly satisfying. It does occasionally lead to something interesting though. I have seen a lot of very interesting mistakes, even.

    Anyway, I was attempting to promote balance.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  10. #90
    winger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Page County, IA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,499
    Images
    47
    Even in the physical sciences (my area), in which you'd think that standing on the shoulders of others is the best way to see forward, i.e. through incremental progress, this can be a real issue. As a teacher, I think we have gone waaay to far from experimentalism and learning through direct experience. The result is a generation of students who can google anything but who are terrified of venturing their own attempt at damn near anything. Education has become so 2-dimensional and dry. No seeds for innovation.
    I know this is off topic for the thread - apologies! But I have to mention that in the lab where I used to work, accreditation has had the effect of making the chemists do everything just by protocol, rather than by common sense or knowledge and experience. They no longer reason their way through something, they just follow the written "rules". Though I miss the paycheck, I'm glad I don't have to deal with that.

    My turn ons:
    -deep, rich prints
    -texture I can feel by sight
    -visual puns and humor

    My turn offs:
    -things I've seen before too many times
    -something I know I could do better

    Yup, I know it when I see it.

Page 9 of 10 FirstFirst ... 345678910 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin