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  1. #91
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    God help us all...



    Ken
    "Hate is an adolescent term used to stop discussion with people you disagree with. You can do better than that."
    —'blanksy', December 13, 2013

  2. #92

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    Despite AA's open-mindedness to the dawn of dramatically newer technology, his own darkroom was
    hardly state of the art even back then. Then when we reivew those moments of ephiphany in his
    personal history, like when he discovered how a simple red filter used for "Monolith", the face of Half
    Dome, would forever change his own way of looking at things, it puts things in better perspective.
    He learned to look and (correctly termed or not) "previsualize". Many so-called photographers today
    don't even known how to look. How one interprets the shot is a related by distinct subject. Ansel was really attuned to the quality of light and how it defined real scenes. ALL photographs are some
    kind of manipulation - just pointing the camera a certain direction means you are taking something
    and turning it into something else, within a new context. But some illusionists are quite skilled at it,
    and making it convincing, and then there's a considerable number of wannabees who show their clumsy hand.

  3. #93

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    And my point is a great print that comes out of the darkroom is hand made, photoshop is not. I have been using it professionally since 1991, photoshop is computer aided photography, not the darkroom by any stretch.

    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    You know, I've seen some pretty horrific prints come out of darkrooms as well.


    Anyway, the point of my earlier posting was to question if if is the tools used to make a great image or the artistic vision of the photographer that is important. My money is with the artistic vision of the photographer.

  4. #94

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    So you are saying the tools used are more important than artistic vision?

  5. #95
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Perhaps the tools used alter the artistic vision?

    Ken
    "Hate is an adolescent term used to stop discussion with people you disagree with. You can do better than that."
    —'blanksy', December 13, 2013

  6. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    Vaughn,

    The problem that I had with your comment is you have no idea what the shooter was thinking of when he tripped the shutter.

    You're basing your statements on total speculation.

    - Leigh
    No, actually, I just ask them...
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  7. #97

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    Mr. Pixel - anything tangible evidence of "vision" has to be some kind of marriage with a specific medium. A potter requires clay. A fresco painter requires plaster. The two grow together. And having
    some kind of restraint actually greases the wheels, so to speak, because it gives one a direction.
    In the hypotethical argument, What would Ansel do today - maybe he would shoot and print digitally.
    But then his legacy would be something completely different, and possibly even a bellyflop. It's one
    thing to reproduce things digitally - either prepress or by inkjet etc. But the learning curve itself,
    and how one get to a vision in the first place, is just as important. For me, the hunt is just as important as the kill. And the darkroom is a real nice place to finish the chase. If someone prefers
    other methods, fine. No problem. And maybe they can mimic what I do. Good luck. It ain't that easy! But better to let each media do what it does best.

  8. #98

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    I can imagine the same sort of comments from portrait oil painters as daguerreotype portraits became popular.


    "It's only real if it's done in oil." ;-)

  9. #99
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    Ah, yes, Moonrise Hernandez... her parents were hippies, you know.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  10. #100
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    I can imagine that the printer’s skill is very akin to a painter who is working from a sketch. The sketch in this case being the negative.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon



 

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