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  1. #111
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    But does that make it a good photo, or a $ value photo?
    what's the difference?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  2. #112
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    It wouldn't even be such a good photograph anymore...

    Google Street View: Moonrise, Hernandez, NM



    Ken
    "When making a portrait, my approach is quite the same as when I am portraying a rock. I do not wish to impose my personality upon the sitter, but, keeping myself open to receive reactions from his own special ego, record this with nothing added: except of course when I am working professionally, when money enters in,—then for a price, I become a liar..."

    — Edward Weston, Daybooks, Vol. II, February 2, 1932

  3. #113

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    Quote Originally Posted by mark View Post
    I thought Van Gogh (sp) was a hack until I saw one of his paintings in person. Seriously. I think this is the nature of any photographer/artist whose images were not meant to be displayed on the digital screen, but hung on a wall.
    Same here as I only viewed his art by books and never really understood "it". I though it was more hype due to the his story. I was in Amsterdam and was floored when I viewed his artworks in the 90's. I still am floored whenever I see his artwork today.

    David

  4. #114
    kintatsu's Avatar
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    For me, it's the feeling of being out of time, of being related to more timeless principles. The presentation is beautiful, due to all the effort he put into making it right, and the play of light and shadow seem to draw you into the mystique of the place and time outside time. That's just my feeling.

  5. #115
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    what's the difference?
    I'm sure for many people there is no difference. Can I take it by your question that you are one of them?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  6. #116

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    I hadn't seen the contact print before. It is a pretty amazing piece of darkroom work, but now I feel more strongly than before that the print is a little bit too "theatrical", with all that drama in the sky.

    But I still think it's a very effective photo for conveying spirit of place. As an ol' desert rat myself, I look at the print and get a real sense of presence: how the air felt, the sense of that dark empty sky overhead, and so on. It's interesting to me to see how other people view this print differently. (To my eye, for instance, the crosses aren't that powerful an element; they draw the eye to the village generally, but I don't get them as strong religious symbolism or a memento mori. That's not to say those who do are wrong, it's just an interesting difference.)

    It's also an outlier in AA's famous work, in that it *doesn't* have so much of that overt "Ain't Nature Grand!" message for which he's known. Maybe that's why it's sort of polarizing.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  7. #117
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    it has impact and interest; the two most important ingredients of a good photograph.not to forget a pleasing composition and technical perfection.
    I think technical perfection is vastly over-rated. Not all photographs work when exposed, developed and printed as if Ansel Adams were the darkroom technician supervising their production. And photography would be unutterably boring if all photographs looked that way. Do I think photographers need to know technique and craftsmanship so that they can consciously choose what they're doing and can control their output? YES. Do they have to swear a life-long allegiance to the f64 School? No. Not everything in life is sharp, not everything is grainless, and not everything fits in the Zone IV-Zone VIII tonal range.

  8. #118
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    I think technical perfection is vastly over-rated. Not all photographs work when exposed, developed and printed as if Ansel Adams were the darkroom technician supervising their production. And photography would be unutterably boring if all photographs looked that way. Do I think photographers need to know technique and craftsmanship so that they can consciously choose what they're doing and can control their output? YES. Do they have to swear a life-long allegiance to the f64 School? No. Not everything in life is sharp, not everything is grainless, and not everything fits in the Zone IV-Zone VIII tonal range.
    +1

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  9. #119
    jovo's Avatar
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    When comparing several well known AA prints of certain negatives made in different decades, it's evident that his aesthetic evolved over time to amplify "impact and interest" to some extent over "technical perfection"* whatever that is. John Szarkowski includes a number of these photographs in "Ansel Adams at 100", and the differences are dramatic with nearly featureless dark areas that were open and detailed in earlier prints. "Moonrise" itself evolved that way, and the last prints are emphatically so. To ask if it's a 'great' photograph is to wonder why the woman I think is beautiful is unattractive to you. Kinda pointless....

    *For me, technical perfection is what occurs when I have made a print that exactly meets the goals I set for it.
    John Voss

    My Blog

  10. #120
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jovo View Post
    For me, technical perfection is what occurs when I have made a print that exactly meets the goals I set for it.
    Those goals being technical perfection.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon



 

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