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  1. #11
    Regular Rod's Avatar
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    They compose themselves. I can't stop myself from looking at them as figures, projecting anthropomorphic ideas onto them that are unjustified, childish and silly but nevertheless that is how I approach trees when carrying a camera...

    RR

  2. #12
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    As I look over my work, I think there is no single answer -- other than perhaps I approach things intuitively. It could be an overall shape, alone or relating to other elements in the frame. It might be a line or curve or group of curves. Maybe an odd perspective such as looking upward into starkly lit branches. I have often been attracted by sycamores with their flaky bark patches, especially highlighted against a deep autumn sky when the trees are bare.

    Sometimes it's about texture. A few years back I took a shot of sycamore tree bark trying out my Bronica macro lens. I got in close and captured about a 12 inch square section of tree trunk (it's in my gallery stuff here). I entered it in an art show under the title "Sycamore." It got a modest award from a judge who is a painter and quite outspoken about believing paintings and photographs shouldn't mix in shows. But in her judge's comments she left "What a creative approach to photographing a tree! Only an artist would pick up on the design offered by nature." One of those "gee, did I do that?" moments! It later sold out of another show. Was it carefully planned, no, just happened the lighting on the nearby tree caught my eye as I was sitting in my car finishing a cup of coffee before going for a walk with the camera. The shot was selected from several taken that morning, but I can't recall any formal process to the one picked -- just that "I liked it best."

    Sorry -- a lot of blather to say "go with your gut instinct."

  3. #13
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    ...Redwoods are perhaps the most difficult to photograph well because of their height and serried arrangement: a pattern must be established that is pleasing to the eye.
    My favorite place to photograph; Carbon prints of various sizes (5x7 and 8x10):
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Maple, Prairie Cr Redwoods_8x10.jpg   Prairie Creek Trail_5x7.jpg   Two Redwoods, Prairie Creek Redwoods_8x10.jpg   Redwood Sunlight, Prairie Creek Redwoods_5x7.jpg   Redwood, Vine Maple, Prairie Creek Redwoods_8x10.jpg  

    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  4. #14
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    They're quite atmospheric images, Vaughn. I resorted to a 24mm tilt/shift lens on my last visit to Avenue of The Sequoias in Victoria's Great Otway National Park, but still ran into problems getting their 75m height. I swapped to 45mm (MF) with studies of the light and shade on the lower trunks in arrangements (similar to photo 4 in your line-up) and this worked very well indeed. They are huge, graceful, straight and very sturdy trees; planted in 1936 as part of an experimental plot on land that gets a lot of fog and mist, which is how sequoias 'drink', by taking in moisture from their crowns. I will return again this winter for more imaging.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  5. #15

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    ho bill.

    when i photograph trees i tend to see them i several ways.
    one might be a compositional element if i see them from a distance
    as the get closer to me i see them differently almost like living sculptures
    not sure if that makes sense.

    cliveh, i totally understand the meditative approach you suggest to your students.
    and can see how people have worshipped and have had a religious/spiritual connection to
    trees and woodlands ...
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  6. #16
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    All I know is I've been trying since I was 12 for a good tree print...
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #17
    irvd2x's Avatar
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    I go with what my eyes enjoy,regardless of the fact that it is a tree.I generally like an aspect of shape or texture or color..the treeness of it.I dont try to show the whole thing as a specimen documentation.


    Sent from my LG-P509 using Tapatalk 2
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails uploadfromtaptalk1389131633451.jpg  

  8. #18
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I love trees. I even find myself talking to them occasionally!

    Sometimes I use my 6x12 camera on its side:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  9. #19
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    Photograph any ash trees you see around you in the US. They won't be around much longer.

  10. #20
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatchetman View Post
    Photograph any ash trees you see around you in the US. They won't be around much longer.
    Why is that?


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

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