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  1. #21
    Regular Rod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I love trees. I even find myself talking to them occasionally!

    Sometimes I use my 6x12 camera on its side:

    Attachment 79826


    Steve.
    +1



    RR

  2. #22
    Regular Rod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    ho bill.

    when i photograph trees i tend to see them i several ways.
    one might be a compositional element if i see them from a distance
    as the get closer to me i see them differently almost like living sculptures
    not sure if that makes sense.

    cliveh, i totally understand the meditative approach you suggest to your students.
    and can see how people have worshipped and have had a religious/spiritual connection to
    trees and woodlands ...
    You make total and perfect sense!

    RR

  3. #23
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    T...They are huge, graceful, straight and very sturdy trees; planted in 1936 as part of an experimental plot on land that gets a lot of fog and mist, which is how sequoias 'drink', by taking in moisture from their crowns...
    As one who has done some study on these beauties, I will say this is not quite right. If the temp gets low enough, fog moving thru Coastal Redwoods, Sequoia sempervirens (rarely are they referred to down here as 'sequoias"...that is usually used for the Sierra redwoods, Sequoiadendron giganteum, such as in Sequoia National Park) the moisture from the fog gathers on the leaves and drips down to the ground, thus providing moisture for the trees during the periods of little rain in the summers. No moisture is drawn in by the leaves, but of course the fog reduces the transpiration rate and helps keep what moisture in the leaves in the leaves.

    While attending university in New Zealand, I would visit the five redwoods in the botanical park in Christchurch about every week (there was one on campus, too). They gave up trying to grow them commercially...they grew too fast, making the wood too weak for structural uses.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Why is that?


    Steve.
    Because of Ash die-back, a fungal disease that has entered the UK from infected Ash from NW Europe, being sold in UK nurseries, and seems to be on the verge of becoming epidemic.

  5. #25
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    I'm not a photograpjic hunter ,looking for a composition I like .I compose my oown scenes in the studio; to me ,it's the difference between taking and making photographs.For treesI'd have to get into bonsai first.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  6. #26

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    Almost all redwood lumber now comes from farmed groves, and I tend to contemptuously refer to the marketed product as "pinkwood" because it is so much
    less dense than old growth redwood lumber. The hills above here once held the tallest trees on earth, and every one of them was cut down. All the redwoods up there now are planted second growth. It is amazing how well designed these trees are at conducting fog moisture into the immediate ecosystem, even where official rainfall amounts are less than ideal. But they can also act like a big umbrella, and numerous times I've had a view camera propped up under one during a heavy rain, without me or my gear getting wet. Last month I was on Maui, where the mid-elevations resemble Marin County here, with open meadows surrounded by transplanted redwood an blue gum groves. I particularly like to play cat and mouse games with the lighting in the redwoods, which can be rather soft and mystical when the fog is present, and then rather quickly transition into hard and crisp, with extreme contrast lighting ratios, once the fog breaks around midday. The latter scenario will quickly separate the men from the boys when it comes to film choice and Zone System skills (plan on twelve or more zones, not eight! - sorry AA, but I don't believe in compensating developers - give me a long-scale film to begin with).

  7. #27
    Hatchetman's Avatar
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    Emerald Ash Borer is killing all the ash trees in the central US.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emerald_ash_borer

  8. #28
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatchetman View Post
    Emerald Ash Borer is killing all the ash trees in the central US.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emerald_ash_borer
    This tests my goodwill towards all creatures great and small. We need some modern-day "Johnny Appleseed" to go around the country scattering granules of Emamectin Benzoate.

  9. #29
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    Actually the tree situation in the US is a bit scary. Way back in the early last century there was the chestnut blight that pretty well wiped out that species (there have been some resistant variations found now making a bit of a comeback). Dutch elm disease has seriously assaulted the American elm which used to line many town streets. And now in addition to the ash problem, there is anthracnose fungus killing off the native dogwoods, woolly adelgid seriously reducing hemlock stands and there are reports of "sudden oak death" in parts of the country. (See evolution at work!) There is also the Asian longhorned beetle, an "import" lurking here and there infesting hardwoods.

  10. #30
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    ... sending out 2 groups of about 10 students and asking both groups to photograph trees, but telling one group they must meditate for several minutes on their subject tree before taking the shot. If we were then to display the images from both groups, would the pictures from the meditation group have more presence?
    I think that's a splendid experiment! I think the two series would have different feel. For example if they were shown on separate walls or separate rooms, viewers would sense "something" was different, even if they couldn't place it.

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