Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,566   Posts: 1,545,402   Online: 1060
      
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst 123456
Results 51 to 58 of 58
  1. #51

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Essex, UK.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    478
    Images
    8
    If you haven't seen this website before, it's worth checking out:

    http://choose-film.com/

    Have a look at the 'shop' heading as it's a link to Fujilab professional shop.

    Paul.
    Paul Jenkin (a late developer...)

  2. #52

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    257
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    This is an old thread but where can a person get transparencies developed these days?
    I guess that all depend on where you live. There is actually an E6 lab right here where I live. I can drop off my film through their door slot after a day of shooting, and have it done the following afternoon. The cost is about $8.00 for 36 exposures - more than C41 done at a typical Walgreens. But less than having C41 processed and printed at an actual professional lab. Of course, Kodachrome has to be sent to Kansas for processing.

  3. #53
    alex gard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Tasmania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    74
    Images
    22
    I'm just an amateur and relatively new to film but have used a few different types of film and here is what I've found: Ektar is a really good film to use on overcast days, it has awesome green tones especially in foliage under canopy. It can be quite 'moody' in this kind of environment. Portra is really a really great all rounder (I've only used 160 and haven't ran any 400 yet) and I love the reds. It shines on sunny days but even in lower light it still works great. Reala is ok but probably not my cup of tea. It has a very strong "70s" colour tone to it (well the roll I shot, anyway) but I was not a fan of the latitude. It renders a scene in a kind of retro way which might suit some people. I have not processed any of my velvia or provia yet but should be in the next couple of weeks. It seems that most people in the know prefer to shoot velvia 50 if they can afford it (I paid $130 AUD for a box of 20 in 4x5 and around $65 for a box of 120) In saing all this I am leaning more towards black and white these days and am actually going to look forward to blowing through all this colour film I have and just sticking to tmax, acros and ektar/portra/velvia. I like acros especially for the reciprocity characteristics and tmax has wonderful contrast

  4. #54

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by alex gard View Post
    I'm just an amateur and relatively new to film but have used a few different types of film and here is what I've found: Ektar is a really good film to use on overcast days, it has awesome green tones especially in foliage under canopy. It can be quite 'moody' in this kind of environment. Portra is really a really great all rounder (I've only used 160 and haven't ran any 400 yet) and I love the reds. It shines on sunny days but even in lower light it still works great. Reala is ok but probably not my cup of tea. It has a very strong "70s" colour tone to it (well the roll I shot, anyway) but I was not a fan of the latitude. It renders a scene in a kind of retro way which might suit some people. I have not processed any of my velvia or provia yet but should be in the next couple of weeks. It seems that most people in the know prefer to shoot velvia 50 if they can afford it (I paid $130 AUD for a box of 20 in 4x5 and around $65 for a box of 120) In saing all this I am leaning more towards black and white these days and am actually going to look forward to blowing through all this colour film I have and just sticking to tmax, acros and ektar/portra/velvia. I like acros especially for the reciprocity characteristics and tmax has wonderful contrast
    I suggest that you do not evaluate film based on prints someone else made. Today, with a limited amount of color paper choices, matching the negative to the paper is critical. And with the limited paper choices available to the home printer, it unfortunately leads us to scanning the negs to compare.

    On another forum I mentioned that bad C41 processing from the 70s led me into slide film and Kodak/Kodalux processing. (I was told I was wrong and that all procesing was fine until about 5 years ago, I left that forum) As I went through the the 80s and early 90s I was happy with the mail order process I'd worked out. In the mid 90s I started doing my own developing. Then the big D started to change everything. Procesing options started to disappear very quickly, the higher quality, mass market ones went first. Today you are left with 3 choices, mass market that you wouldn't trust to lick a stamp; hi end hi price hi quality houses; do it yourself. DiY comes in 2 flavors, analog printing and digital printing/sharing.

  5. #55
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,279
    Images
    12
    Guys, this thread is like a decade old and stale.

  6. #56
    Regular Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Derbyshire
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    479
    Quote Originally Posted by game View Post
    Hi everyone,
    I have been looking all over the internet for a good professional color negative film for landscape, but I can't find it.
    I have been using Kodak's portra vc in 35mm version, and just shot a 120 roll of portra Nc with my new 6x7.

    I shoot artpictures, always landscapes/cityscapes. I don't need my photo's to be extremely colorish. I just want them to be corresponding to what I see.

    Portra obviousy is made for portraits. At my artschool everyone is using portra.... But portrait is not what I am shooting.
    Anyone any ideas for a film? evything is welcome, also any other comments on portra.

    Best regards Sam
    Portra is very good for landscapes, but I prefer Ektar 100. The colours seem to me to be more natural and the grain is very fine indeed.

    RR

  7. #57
    Alan Klein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Jersey .........formerly NYC.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    464
    I hope after 7 years you've chosen a film to use for landscapes. You are still shooting film, aren't you?

  8. #58
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,127
    I use Kodak Portra 400 unless there is the subject is highly colorful such as sunrises, sunsets, red rock in the Four Corners Area of the US then I use Kodak Ultra Color 400 or Kodak Vivid Color from my stash in the freezer. The advantage of the Hasselblad or any MF camera that has changeable film backs or LF is that one can change film backs without lossing frames.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst 123456


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin