Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,754   Posts: 1,515,924   Online: 1033
      
Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 64
  1. #31
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,620
    Images
    40
    None...yet. Fortunately, in the image near the top of the dune, the sand was blowing at ground level through a "pass" between the top of the dune and a ridge. I might be able to scan the image tonight and post it here -- though it is getting off topic, as it has no people in it (except for the photographer -- who is always in the photograph!) Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  2. #32
    Blighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lancaster, N.W. England
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    874
    Images
    68
    In general, though not exclusively, I prefer my scenes with people. If I'm being specific, I like the idea of ancient and immutable landscapes juxtaposed with the fleeting lives and movements of the people within them. The work of Joe Cornish, Charlie Waite etc, although technically superb, leaves me feeling cold, emotionally detatched and strangely depressed. Certainly, in Britain, the landscape is very rarely true wilderness; so much of it having been transformed, shaped, primped and preened by human agency. Therefore why seek to expunge all trace of humanity? In many cases we created the landscape, and we are a natural part of it. Why go to a zoo and photograph the architecture?
    Norman is an island.Time and tide wait for Norman.

  3. #33
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by Blighty View Post
    Why go to a zoo and photograph the architecture?
    Well put.

    I have witnessed, on several occasions, people going to extraordinary lengths at places like death valley to obtain photographs with no evidence of humanity in them. If you just step out onto the dunes, you can hear people cursing. How dare someone leave footprints on my dunes!

    I suppose some photographers would like to give the impression, in their photographs, that they have discovered an entirely new scene. You know, walk 20 feet firm your car with a big camera and tripod and try to get an image that looks like you actually explored new terrain ...as if landscape photography were an act of claiming or owning.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    268
    In general, people are a distraction in a landscape. With practice you can become skilled at "getting rid" of people (and I don't mean running at them screaming "leprosy, unclean!!!"). Wait until they step behind a tree, reposition yourself slightly, etc. It takes some thought and practice, but the results are well worth it.

    That being said, a single person caught unawares in a particular location or physical attitude can really add to the composition. But these situations are really pretty rare. What a happy day it will be when that ridiculous photo class aphorism of "always include a person in your photographs" is put to rest. Anyone who can't compose a shot without sticking a person in it needs to get another hobby!

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,907
    I have so many images where a person or people enhanced the sense of scale and meaning of the actual location. I have many shots of Grand Canyon area like this. Without people, magnitude of scale is unimaginable and without people, the fact that it is a popular tourist location isn't apparent. (I have one that people are basically crawling all over the place) I'd post a sample but it was digitally captured, so I wont.

    I also have shots where I waited (for a long time) for people to go out of the view.

    I think, as long as your views and pre-visualization permits them and they aren't doing anything disturbing (like picking their noses), people can enhance landscape images. So as always, my answer is "it depends!"
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #36
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,011
    Images
    60
    Sometimes, just a hint of "people" is all you really need
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 26c-2010-10-11-BW.jpg  
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #37

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    28
    Isn't this basically a "Landscape photo" vs. "Environmental portrait" discussion?

  8. #38
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Milton, DE, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,980
    Blog Entries
    29
    Images
    19
    I'm generally in line here. Landscapes are preferably (to me) just that, LANDscapes.

    I can only think of one exception, presently. My mother made a fantastic vertical composition of very tall standing pines in Beaver Creek SP in Ohio some years back. She included my brother in the photograph. Totally against all rules. The row was dead center, destroying the rule of thirds. And the was a man it it. But he is so small compared to the setting that he is a poigniant scale within the subject. Actually adds power to the shot.

    So, in short, no. With exceptions, rare though they may be.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  9. #39

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,769
    In my gadget bag alongside the wire filter is a people filter. Pop it on the lens and people will no longer be visible in the photo.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  10. #40
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Milton, DE, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,980
    Blog Entries
    29
    Images
    19
    WIRE FILTER! Where can I get one?
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin