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  1. #11
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    Bracket widely.
    Or wildly!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  2. #12
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    With a 720nm filter, my experience is f16 at one sec for bright sun. I used that for the Efke, and just did my first roll of Rollei and got good negatives. IMHO, trying to use a light meter for IR will often be misleading. IR is not always proportional to the visible spectrum. I'd start at the f16 & one sec. and bracket for the first roll. That should get you started.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Kubach View Post
    I love that picture!

    Jeff
    Thanks, Jeff! >This one (link)< is shot on EFKE IR820 (non-aura). Some other pictures can be found on my webiste ...

  4. #14

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    Excellent pictures! I love infraed pictures!

    Jeff

  5. #15

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    I like the Rollei 400 IR film, shot with an R72 filter, and basically treat it like an ISO 25 film (if your metering is not TTL). I was always quite happy with the results, you just need to ensure a lot of sunlight or other IR light source.

  6. #16
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Or wildly!


    Steve.
    Yep. It's roll film; if the image matters (don't they all?!) then bracket and shoot multiples as well; some of the films have the nasty habit of developing pinhole-like artifacts. By 'bracket widely' (or wildly) I mean: best guess for filter exposure compensation +/- 3 stops.

    I shot some long-expired konica with a red filter and the result were quite decent. The image and details are here.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  7. #17
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    By 'bracket widely' (or wildly) I mean: best guess for filter exposure compensation +/- 3 stops.
    I haven't done much IR but if I understand you correctly, I agree. Not much point bracketing at one stop intervals, two or three would be better.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  8. #18
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    Kodak High Speed Infra-red film and black filter (Hoya R72)

    Latitude around 38º

    Clear sun summer 1/125 f/16

    Clear sun winter 1/125 f/11

    Cloudy bright 1/60 f/11

    Overcast 1/30 f/11


    Pretty much no need to bracket.

    Use the filter up to the eye and use your hand to block out sunlight, scan the scene and you will see exactly where foliage or whatever is glowing, shoot.

    I have shot 100 + rolls of Kodak HIE Infra-Red film using those parameters. I very rarely bracketed and have mostly good contact sheets of fairly constant exposures.

    You cannot use any normal light meter to see if there is any Infra-Red around. You need to scan the scene as I mentioned.

    I have about 15 rolls left in one of my freezers

    Mick.

  9. #19
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Mick, HIE was substantially easier to shoot than most of the near-IR films now on the market. It had sensitivity quite a bit further out into the IR and so haze is therefore much less of a problem. Also, if you look at the curves for films like Rollei IR , superpan, etc. their sensitivities drop off steeply right across the range where you want to filter them to get optimal Wood effect. The results are therefore much less predictable.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  10. #20
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    Keith, I agree with your assessment of the current crop of IR films, that said the OP has 1 roll of Kodak High Speed IR film and my exposure regime at or around 38º latitude does work remarkably well.

    Hopefully this information may enable the owner of that roll to get a reasonably good strike rate.

    We'll see, it could be off, as I well know.

    Just one more thing to mention to the OP, load the Kodak film in total darkness, and I mean total darkness, otherwise your film will probably suffer from piping.

    Piping is where light travels up the film via the leader sticking outside the cassette, it is a real and definite problem.

    Mick.

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