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  1. #1

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    Infrared Photography & Landscapes!

    I just received a roll of Kodak HIE, Konica 750 and EFKE IR820 Aura. I will most likely purchase some Rollei Infrared 400 and Ilford SFX 200 and shoot a whole series of landscapes with pure infrared films, using only a Hoya Red 25A, Hoya Skylight, Hoya R72 Infrared filter and a circular polarizer.

    Does anyone have any advice for any films listed? (ASA, filter combinations, filter compensation with stops, development with D-76, focusing adjustments, etc.) I have experience with EFKE IR820 Aura but I would like to hear what people with more experience have to say.

    Thanks to all, your advice is truly appreciated!

  2. #2
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The APUG search function is your friend :

    http://www.apug.org/forums/search.ph...hid=460442&pp=
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #3

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    If you can obtain it the book "Infra-Red Photography" by Hugh Milsom is worth getting. He used, I think, most if not all of the films you mention.

    pentaxuser

  4. #4
    mooseontheloose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CSULB_Student View Post
    I just received a roll of Kodak HIE, Konica 750 and EFKE IR820 Aura. I will most likely purchase some Rollei Infrared 400 and Ilford SFX 200 and shoot a whole series of landscapes with pure infrared films, using only a Hoya Red 25A, Hoya Skylight, Hoya R72 Infrared filter and a circular polarizer.

    Does anyone have any advice for any films listed? (ASA, filter combinations, filter compensation with stops, development with D-76, focusing adjustments, etc.) I have experience with EFKE IR820 Aura but I would like to hear what people with more experience have to say.

    Thanks to all, your advice is truly appreciated!
    Hi Christian (noticed this same question elsewhere)

    What are you shooting with? Some cameras may fog your film.

    You don't need the polarizer or skylight filter. The R72 will work with all the films, the red25 only with HIE. I would recommend starting with the Aura (and Rollei and SFX if you get them) to get a better handle on what infrared can do before shooting your one and only rolls of HIE and Konica.

    By the way, do you know how old the HIE and Konica films are? How have they been stored (frozen)? They've both been discontinued for some time and are prone to fogging with age. I haven't had to deal with that issue yet (I have a couple of rolls of HIE left), but you may want to consider a different developer than D76 if you think you may have to deal with fog.

    Digitaltruth has some good comparison articles about infrared here.
    And at Squarefrog here.
    And a few other links: here, here, and here.
    Rachelle

    My favorite thing is to go where I've never been. D. Arbus

  5. #5
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Bracket widely.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  6. #6

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    @MattKing: Thanks, I searched most films but some, like Konica, did not have much advice and it has been some time since people have discussed it since it was discontinued so long ago. (:

    @pentaxuser: I will definitely pick up a copy of this book! I have a few books on Infrared Photography (Infrared Photography Handbook, Advanced Photography Handbook & Infrared Nude Photography.) They only had limited advice on HIE and Konica but a great background explanation on how the Infrared spectrum works.

    @mooseontheloose: I use a Pentax K-1000 for 35mm and I never had a trouble with fogging when shooting infrared. I think I might use a Red 25A filter and then shoot the exact same scene with the R72 next. The HIE is dated October 2003, Konica is dated February 1993 and the EFKE is still fresh until 2012. They have all been kept frozen since purchase by original owner and myself. The only reason why I considered D-76 is because I have gallons of stock solution in storage and I found development times for all films but any suggestions are welcome. (:

    @keithwms: I have used the bracket method with the EFKE only and found that using an R72 +5stops at ASA 200 brings great results. However I am not sure if I should apply this to all infrared films.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by CSULB_Student View Post
    @keithwms: I have used the bracket method with the EFKE only and found that using an R72 +5stops at ASA 200 brings great results. However I am not sure if I should apply this to all infrared films.
    Probably not "all", because it depends on how much IR the film "sees"---quite a lot for HIE, hardly any for the Rollei, somewhere in between with the Efke...

    Basically, a 5-stop filter factor for an R72 means that you're assuming that the amount of IR "seen" by the film---considering both the filter's curve and the film's response---is 1/32 the intensity of visible light seen by the meter. Well, as you change films, the amount of visible light doesn't change, but the amount of IR the film sees will: for instance, HIE sees much more, because it responds to high-IR at wavelengths way, way past the cutoffs of the other films.

    Rollei IR400 is the opposite; it's a pretty fast film, but it's sensitive to IR only up to a fairly low level---not much above the point where an R72 filter really starts transmitting, so when you put the film and the filter together you limit the "effective" light to a very narrow band, so it takes a lot of compensation.

    You can usually get away with *less* compensation at morning and evening than at midday, which is kind of counterintuitive. The same effect that causes sunrises and sunsets to be red means that there's more IR around then too, relative to visible light---the total light is less than it would be at midday, but the portion of it that's in the infrared range is relatively high, so you don't have to compensate as much from a visible-light meter reading.

    Results vary with latitude and weather, too. Experiment, bracket, and consider using a compensating developer.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  8. #8

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    I was wondering if the red line on my lens is the infrared focus. I was not 100% sure but it's a good guess. It's a Sears Multicoated 200mm Lens (:

    @ntenny: Thanks for the explanation! I am glad you responded in time because I was planning on going on a photo shoot tomorrow. I do not want to ruin my only roll of Konica 750, and Kodak HIE since there are limited amounts available. I will try and bracket on all the films. Hoping for the best. Any tips on where to start the bracket method though?

  9. #9
    vanourek's Avatar
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    I meter the Efke IR820 AURA at ISO 1,5 to 3 with a 720nm filter, exposure times in daylight at f/22 are very long. See the picture on this link: http://ladavanicek.cz/krajina_1/5032...4a36590c_b.jpg - it's the IR820 AURA 6x7 negative, exposure - as far I can remember - about 15 seconds in sunny afternoon.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by vanourek View Post
    I meter the Efke IR820 AURA at ISO 1,5 to 3 with a 720nm filter, exposure times in daylight at f/22 are very long. See the picture on this link: http://ladavanicek.cz/krajina_1/5032...4a36590c_b.jpg - it's the IR820 AURA 6x7 negative, exposure - as far I can remember - about 15 seconds in sunny afternoon.
    I love that picture!

    Jeff

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