Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,302   Posts: 1,536,177   Online: 686
      
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 44
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Doncaster, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    56
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffreyg View Post
    Why look at others? If you are looking to break from sweeping vistas and for that matter B&W why not go out with color and a long lens or perhaps macro and develop your own vision. It is not the easiest thing to do when you appreciate what others have done and that is in the back of your mind. A couple of names that come to mind with color are Eliot Porter and Ernst Haas (both not too contemporary) as well as Joel Meyerowitz. They have very large bodies of work that include a variety of treatments of the landscape.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/
    That's something I always think about. My tutors are always telling me to look at others' work and do lots of research and we actually get marked down if we don't do enough but most of the time I think if i look too much at others' work I have a terrible tendency to be too influenced by them, if that makes sense.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada. Ex-California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    346
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffreyg View Post
    Why look at others?
    "Bad artists copy; great artists steal." -- Pablo Picasso

    Any artist who thinks they know it all and don't need to look at other work has reached a conclusion and stopped thinking and stopped growing.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada. Ex-California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    346
    Quote Originally Posted by MamiyaJen View Post
    most of the time I think if i look too much at others' work I have a terrible tendency to be too influenced by them, if that makes sense.
    Don't fret. Look at so many other photographers' work that no one photographer's influence dominates. Anyway, so what if one or ten influence you? All great artists have been influenced and build on the shoulders of giants.

    If you want to get beyond what a favourite artist does you have to go through it. You can't hop over. You will either recreate all their steps without seeing their work or you will see their work and go through it faster.

  4. #14
    dasBlute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    164
    Images
    21
    Some California folks I'm familiar with:
    Roman Loranc
    Bob Kolbrener
    the Jordahls

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Colorado Springs, Colorado
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    119

  6. #16
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,185
    Everyone in this book. This is my 'bible' of contemporary landscape
    Between Home and Heaven: Contemporary American Landscape Photography [Paperback]
    Merry Foresta (Author), Stephen Jay Gould (Author), Karal Ann Marling (Author)

  7. #17
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Henrico, Virginia USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,604
    Images
    32
    What about
    Bill Schwab (http://www.billschwab.com/) or Brian Kosoff (http://www.briankosoff.com)?
    Tim Rudman is widely known for his toning and lith expertise, but he is as fine a photographer as you'll ever see (http://www.timrudman.com/)
    ____________________________________________
    Searching my way to perplexion

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Doncaster, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    56
    Thanks everyone there's some great photographers come up here, some known most unknown. Great

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    135
    Michael Kenna, Christopher Burkett, Edward Burtynsky, Clyde Butcher and myself of course to name a few.

    www.frankbunnik.zenfolio.com

  10. #20
    Sparky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,100
    Quote Originally Posted by Monito View Post
    "Bad artists copy; great artists steal." -- Pablo Picasso

    Any artist who thinks they know it all and don't need to look at other work has reached a conclusion and stopped thinking and stopped growing.



    TOTALLY AGREE. After being involved with photography and education for close to 30 years now, the best advice I have to give is this. If you're interested in someone's work, COPY IT. Try to make some of the same photographs. Chances are - you'll find you'll be leaving your own fingerprint on the work - in doing this, you are exploring aspects of what you find interesting about it. Once you start actually THINKING about it and exploring the options - you'll find you'll end up at a place that's very different from where you started - and probably a lot more satisfying to your own interests. But you have to put in some brain time to get there. You can't get there without that investment - or commitment.

    There are a lot of good books out there - compendia on contemporary photography. Go to the library. Go to book stores. Spend some time with your head in the pages. Don't limit yourself to artificial categories like 'landscape' either - it may well be that what you find interesting about that category can be had in another form... second guess yourself. That's what it's all about. Good luck!

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin