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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Re: earlier comments in this thread about looking at other artists' work.

    My recommendation is to let other artists INSPIRE you to do great things. If their work does not inspire you, then perhaps you should continue your research, but remember anyway, because the work that doesn't set off your creative juices can teach you something too!

    To draw a social parallel - how do you form opinions of things? How do you learn in school? You talk to other people, read books they wrote, or listen to them speak, and then you combine those thoughts with what's in your own experience. Sometimes other people tell you something so profound that it alters the way you think. Other times not so much, but it still helps you gain perspective into other people's lives and develop empathy.

    Now apply that to photography, or any other art form - I'm sure it could only be good to look at the work of others, whether it inspires you or not. But the idea is to learn from others, learn how to see things you perhaps otherwise would have missed, and you shouldn't be worried about 'copying' because it's all filtered through your mind and your process anyway. Even if you tried to recreate the work of someone else, you could not, so relax, enjoy the view, and learn as much as you can about seeing, printing, presentation, framing, gesture, etc.

    - Thomas
    I think we'll have to disagree here. I can honestly say that when i look at photography that doesn't interest me, i take nothing from it. I have a very short attention span so something has to grab me, if it doesn't i don't bother wasting my time going back to it. Take Shane Lynam for example, he started following me on tumblr, i followed back, i looked at his site and his flickr and there hasn't been a day go by since that i haven't looked at his work. Something has to grab me like that.

    As for copying other's work, i never even attempt that anymore. Shirley Baker once said that everytime she attempted to copy another photographer's style, she failed. I've been there and done that and learned my lesson long ago. I just love to sit and look at photographs that interest and inspire me.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by MamiyaJen View Post
    I think we'll have to disagree here. I can honestly say that when i look at photography that doesn't interest me, i take nothing from it. I have a very short attention span so something has to grab me, if it doesn't i don't bother wasting my time going back to it. Take Shane Lynam for example, he started following me on tumblr, i followed back, i looked at his site and his flickr and there hasn't been a day go by since that i haven't looked at his work. Something has to grab me like that.

    As for copying other's work, i never even attempt that anymore. Shirley Baker once said that everytime she attempted to copy another photographer's style, she failed. I've been there and done that and learned my lesson long ago. I just love to sit and look at photographs that interest and inspire me.
    Ehrm... I'm saying pretty much what you're saying. You say you love to look at other photographers' work that grab you. Isn't that what I recommended?

    Carry on...
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Ehrm... I'm saying pretty much what you're saying. You say you love to look at other photographers' work that grab you. Isn't that what I recommended?

    Carry on...
    You said i should still look at work that doesn't really interest me because i might still take something from it, and i disagreed. At least i think that's what you said...haha

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by MamiyaJen View Post
    You said i should still look at work that doesn't really interest me because i might still take something from it, and i disagreed. At least i think that's what you said...haha
    OK. I see what you mean. It's so difficult to explain written language so that it isn't misunderstood.

    When you're out looking at the work of other photographers, in order to find the stuff you really like, you have to look at some that you don't like too. Everything you find in books, catalogs, galleries, museums, curatorial departments, etc can't all be just wonderful - some of it has to fall outside your realm of what you like. This begs the question: If you don't know what's bad, how do you know what's good?

    So my suggestion is to use what you don't like, since you're there, running across it anyway, to define and reinforce your aesthetic for what you do like, because it helps to define you as an art observer. Since you have to glance at it to determine that you don't like it anyway.

    Or do whatever you want. I'm just speaking my mind, as I'm sure you are. Like you I prefer to seek out the work of others that I really love, since that's what really inspires me. But I certainly don't like everything I come across, even from great established artists, which makes me wonder why, and asking questions is good.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #35
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    I was going to recommend Burtynsky, but he's already been mentioned. So I won't mention that you should revisit Burtynsky

    Actually, I think it's important to look at things that challenge you.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

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  7. #37
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    Richard Misrach?

    And for something a little different -- not to everyone's taste, certainly, but I think her work is fascinating -- Beate Gutschow. Mentioning her name also has the pleasant side-effect of doubling the number of female photographers mentioned so far in this thread, I think?

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trakl View Post
    Richard Misrach?

    And for something a little different -- not to everyone's taste, certainly, but I think her work is fascinating -- Beate Gutschow. Mentioning her name also has the pleasant side-effect of doubling the number of female photographers mentioned so far in this thread, I think?
    oooh she's new to me but thank you i am loving her work!

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpsawin View Post
    Thanks for turning me on to Bruce Barnbaum! Absolutely outstanding portfolio. Love it.

  10. #40

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    I've just taken a look at Shane Lynams work. I like it and repect the artistic practice and approach that informs it. This work starts from a concept, is informed by a personal aesthetic and presented in an artistic folio format. It has cultural and undercurrents of socio-political themes so isn't just a nice picture of trees or a hill side. In some ways its more diffecult taking this concept approach because you have to observe and edit towards a specific objective while of course remaining somewhat openminded if some preconceived notion isn't borne out in the images.

    I wish you look in the formulation of your own concepts to explore.

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