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  1. #1

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    Critique please - Portrait In the park


    CNV00030.jpg by biotecbob, on Flickr

    Kodak Portra, EOS 1V HS.

  2. #2

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    Sweet. Very expressive.

  3. #3
    omaha's Avatar
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    Its a lovely image.

    Personally, I find the fabric on her shirt to be distractingly busy, but otherwise I wouldn't change a thing.

    Cheers!

  4. #4
    MattKing's Avatar
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    This is quite different - in an interesting way, but I'm not sure that it is different in a pretty or attractive way.

    So if you are trying to present it as a child portrait that the parents will love, I'm not sure that it succeeds

    The eyes bother me - they follow me as I move around the room.

    And the out of focus arm reaching back to the fence somehow makes the child look overly large.

    Sorry if I sound a bit harsh.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #5
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    In all portraits, the eyes must give something, communicate something, to the viewer. Remember Steve McCurry's famed image, the Afghan Girl of 1985? What was it that struck the world dumb? It was the eyes, no less. This image is a winner for those big, bold, clear and expressive eyes. Depth of field has been well controlled to add just a touch of background accompaniment that suits the photo and there appears to be spontaneity in the fleeting pose, but only you can tell us what it really is. The colour and clarity is quite striking. It's the sort of pic I would frame and hang in my gallery. It is beautiful.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  6. #6
    clayne's Avatar
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    I like the exposure, composition, development, etc. but I don't care too much for the facial expression as there is a bit of a menacing feeling coming from it. I'm not sure if she's uncertain or insecure about the situation, or what's causing it, but it's there. Shirt pattern doesn't bother me.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  7. #7
    Truzi's Avatar
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    I agree with the comments that the photo is well done technically.
    Truzi

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    Since you asked, I can be critical, right?

    To me, this portrait of a child does not work very well. Here are my reasons. First of all, it does not look natural. The setting, the pose, the expression, and choice of clothing does not belong to a child of this age. It's more like moody teenager type photograph. Also, I'm not sure what this photograph says.... It doesn't say happy child. It also doesn't say she's sad about something. It doesn't say a child being herself. It doesn't say.... anything particular. My eyes goes to her eyes immediately. (that's great) but then goes to her right arm and right out the frame. (not good)

    Not saying I can do better. But this is what I would say, if I was asked to comment critically. I'm sorry this is so critical and negative.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #9

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    Thank you for the very interesting thoughts. I didn't expect such wonderfully detailed and insightful critique, it is very helpful to have your impartial appraisal. BTW This is just a candid shot of my daughter.

  10. #10
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    Since you asked, I can be critical, right?

    To me, this portrait of a child does not work very well. Here are my reasons. First of all, it does not look natural. The setting, the pose, the expression, and choice of clothing does not belong to a child of this age. It's more like moody teenager type photograph. Also, I'm not sure what this photograph says.... It doesn't say happy child. It also doesn't say she's sad about something. It doesn't say a child being herself. It doesn't say.... anything particular. My eyes goes to her eyes immediately. (that's great) but then goes to her right arm and right out the frame. (not good)

    Not saying I can do better. But this is what I would say, if I was asked to comment critically. I'm sorry this is so critical and negative.

    Critique means an informed, balanced, impartial and educated assessment. It does not mean critical in the scathing, searing, judgemental, contrived sense (no, that's not you, but just giving an example). Critical analysis would go much, much deeper than the brevity of on the spot scope sought by the OP.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






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