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  1. #21
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jovo View Post
    My father was an excellent portrait photographer whose images blended Karsh like lighting formality with relaxed invitations to the sitter to talk, or be expressive in whatever way they chose. He used a view camera and took great pains to compose a picture so that light would reveal features successfully, and focus would have as much dof as possible, and then he would stand beside the camera and not look at the GG again. He would talk to the sitters, and get them to forget the camera was even there. Since most subjects were used to seeing a photographer glued to the view finder, his detachment from the GG put them at ease. They didn't even realize he'd tripped the shutter with a long cable release until he went back to the camera to change the film holder. Because of the moving around I've done over the decades, I no longer have any of his work. but I remember the best of it vividly to this day. So....my dad was my favorite portraitist!
    That was Avedon's technique too. It really works well. I've been trying it myself. It isn't as easy as it sounds like it should be.

  2. #22
    lns
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    I think this is a matter of taste. For example, I went to a huge Karsh retrospective and could not get through it. To me his work was all technique, and just empty. The prints were dramatic, of course. In the next room were maybe a dozen of Avedon's portraits, which also were beautifully printed pieces but in addition had artistic resonance, for me, and conveyed a certain psychological insight. FWIW, I can see others feeling the opposite. It's what you like.

    Some of my favorite "portraits" were done by Henri Cartier-Bresson, and with a Leica. They are informal and the opposite of what most people in this thread would consider portraiture, but they teach me something every time I view them.

    Did anyone mention Irving Penn? I love his work, and find his corner portraits especially brilliant.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by jovo View Post
    My father was an excellent portrait photographer whose images blended Karsh like lighting formality with relaxed invitations to the sitter to talk, or be expressive in whatever way they chose. He used a view camera and took great pains to compose a picture so that light would reveal features successfully, and focus would have as much dof as possible, and then he would stand beside the camera and not look at the GG again. He would talk to the sitters, and get them to forget the camera was even there. Since most subjects were used to seeing a photographer glued to the view finder, his detachment from the GG put them at ease. They didn't even realize he'd tripped the shutter with a long cable release until he went back to the camera to change the film holder. Because of the moving around I've done over the decades, I no longer have any of his work. but I remember the best of it vividly to this day. So....my dad was my favorite portraitist!
    i worked with someone named eileen mcclure who worked this way, every day from the 1930s -1990s.
    i was lucky enough to meet her, print her work, learn lighting, retouching technique &c from her.
    she was a local legend and she is my favorite portrait photographer.
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  4. #24
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    Arnold Newman

  5. #25
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    I think Julia Margaret Cameron was pretty good.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by jovo View Post
    My father was an excellent portrait photographer whose images blended Karsh like lighting formality with relaxed invitations to the sitter to talk, or be expressive in whatever way they chose. He used a view camera and took great pains to compose a picture so that light would reveal features successfully, and focus would have as much dof as possible, and then he would stand beside the camera and not look at the GG again. He would talk to the sitters, and get them to forget the camera was even there. Since most subjects were used to seeing a photographer glued to the view finder, his detachment from the GG put them at ease. They didn't even realize he'd tripped the shutter with a long cable release until he went back to the camera to change the film holder. Because of the moving around I've done over the decades, I no longer have any of his work. but I remember the best of it vividly to this day. So....my dad was my favorite portraitist!
    I've made my favorite portraits using this exact technique. Shame you do not have any of his work to share, I would have loved to see it.

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