Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,557   Posts: 1,545,151   Online: 976
      
Page 3 of 10 FirstFirst 123456789 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 91

Thread: My Gothic Son

  1. #21

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Castle Rock, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,374
    Images
    64
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    Actually when I was a kid in the 60's, our school and our classrooms were almost exactly like Miss Lander's class, and our family and neighborhood lives were almost exactly like Beav, and Larry, and Whitey, Tooey, Lumpy, Chester, and Wally. And there was always a Judy Hensler type in the classroom.
    Leave it to Beaver was practically a reality show to me.
    Edit: oops, Almost forgot about Eddie Haskell. We had one of those too. His name was Sam Helms.
    My school and classrooms were too. But then, around 1968, something went terribly wrong.
    “You seek escape from pain. We seek the achievement of happiness. You exist for the sake of avoiding punishment. We exist for the sake of earning rewards. Threats will not make us function; fear is not our incentive. It is not death that we wish to avoid, but life that we wish to live.” - John Galt

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,278
    Images
    21
    It's probably hopelessly dated now, but there used to be a standard joke about emo grass. It cuts itself, you see.

    At my age I'm supposed to be a curmudgeon about all the different cultural classifications of youth, I guess, but I still think they're kind of charming. The ability of young people to generate endless different signifiers of identity, and thus provide the portraitists among us with an ever-evolving pool of raw material, is astonishing and admirable.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  3. #23
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,649
    Images
    40
    Great image! Amazing enough he posed for you, I suppose!

    I have three 17 year old boys (17 at the end of the month technically) -- no goths, emos, scenes, or whatever. Don't know why. I have one that wants to start his own hedge fund, live in a big apartment in NYC and wants to go to Harvard or Stanford. One that is thinking about the Colorado School of Mines to study Fusion, and one that spends a lot of time on the computer playing games (not a full-blown gamer, but close, so I do have a 'something', I guess).

    Definitely not Leave It to Beaver -- I was a SAHD, wife divorced me when the boys were old enough that she thought they could handle it, and the boys bounce back between us every two weeks.

    The Boys
    11x14 negative, Platinum print
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 1 Boys_Luffenholtz.jpg  
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  4. #24
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,337
    Images
    225

    My Gothic Son

    Quote Originally Posted by pbromaghin View Post
    My school and classrooms were too. But then, around 1968, something went terribly wrong.
    Dissolutionment...

    Essentially those being beaten at home, drunk fathers and loveless mothers, and seeing it on TV completely different, that spawned the hippies... Trying to find something REAL instead of something they were told was how it should be when it never was that way... For most...
    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    It's probably hopelessly dated now, but there used to be a standard joke about emo grass. It cuts itself, you see.

    At my age I'm supposed to be a curmudgeon about all the different cultural classifications of youth, I guess, but I still think they're kind of charming. The ability of young people to generate endless different signifiers of identity, and thus provide the portraitists among us with an ever-evolving pool of raw material, is astonishing and admirable.

    -NT
    This is a nice perspective to have, instead of complaining about "all the darn tattoos" now, embracing the new raw material as something new to work with instead of the "same old thing" I hope I can keep that and remember it in my own old age.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  5. #25

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    US
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,060
    Quote Originally Posted by pbromaghin View Post
    My school and classrooms were too. But then, around 1968, something went terribly wrong.
    Yeah, timetable is about right. I know what went wrong, but this isn't the forum for that.

  6. #26
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,649
    Images
    40
    Quote Originally Posted by pbromaghin View Post
    My school and classrooms were too. But then, around 1968, something went terribly wrong.
    Or wonderfully right, depending on one's point of view. The "Leave It to Beaver" times were not as good as nostalgia would love to make it. Much better now. IMO, of course, and always plenty of room for improvement.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  7. #27
    Truzi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,043
    My parents had me watch Blackboard Jungle when I was in my early teens. Quite a contrast to Leave it to Beaver.
    Truzi

  8. #28

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    US
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,060
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Dissolutionment...

    Essentially those being beaten at home, drunk fathers and loveless mothers, and seeing it on TV completely different, that spawned the hippies... Trying to find something REAL instead of something they were told was how it should be when it never was that way... For most...


    This is a nice perspective to have, instead of complaining about "all the darn tattoos" now, embracing the new raw material as something new to work with instead of the "same old thing" I hope I can keep that and remember it in my own old age.
    Stone, the problem with "diversity" is that we use to have a lot of it. But when they made it compulsory, now it's all the same.

  9. #29
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,654
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post

    Essentially those being beaten at home, drunk fathers and loveless mothers, and seeing it on TV completely different, that spawned the hippies... Trying to find something REAL instead of something they were told was how it should be when it never was that way... For most...
    Stone, you are a perceptive young man, and I'm glad to see you calling bullshit on our collective fantasies of the good old days.

    I am a year older than Tom. I did not have any TV-style upbringing. My parents were divorced, and my mom beat me with an electrical cord several times a week, hard enough to break the skin. The neighbors heard it all, but they did what people did back in the 60's- they "minded their own business". I was hardly the only one. Some kids had a father who stopped at the bar on the way home and drank in front of the TV after dinner. Or just stayed at the bar, which to some kids was better than him being home. A classmate of mine wrote a book about the constant physical and psychological abuse she and her sisters received from her cruel father including her being raped starting at age 5, and how she overcame the damage as an adult. It was hard to read, especially knowing that she hid all the pain from us classmates so well. But that's what kids do, they hide it out of fear of humiliation. When her book came out, some other classmates starting relating their experiences, and what I was most stunned at was that some of them had what I thought was happy families. Some externally perfect families hid their realities of drunkenness, abuse of tranquilizers and diet pills, spousal abuse, child abuse and molestation.

    There were plenty of good and happy families then, as there are now. And a substantial number of families in which the kids suffer, just as now.

    The TV portrayal of American life back then, of the Cleavers and the Nelsons and the Bradys, was a portrayal of white suburban life, idealized at that, and had nothing to do with life as it was for millions of minorities and poor whites in this country. There are lots of photographs from those times which depict the reality of life for those millions. Yet so many of my contemporaries seem to forget those, and only remember the TV shows. I like the shows myself- I just don't see them as depicting the whole reality by any stretch.

    The young people of today live in a reality we made. They're figuring out who they are, just as we all did. I took a lot of crap in the early 70's for my long hair- called names, refused service in stores, accused as young as 14 of being a "drug user", assaulted by scissors-wielding asses (who did not succeed in giving me a haircut). Several years later, long hair was commonplace and no one cared. I don't like piercings and don't care much for tattoos, (though some are spectacular). But it would be asinine of me to pass judgment on the people who have them, as it would mean I learned nothing from my experiences being judged.
    It's easy to say (and I've said it) that the Emo kids don't really have anything to be morose about- that they have had it better than most people, and they don't know what real suffering is. I've heard it said (not that I have any idea) that most of them have had such ordinary lives that being Emo is a way for them to feel something intensely. Maybe they feel lost. I remember being young and feeling lost. They are hardly the first disaffected or disconnected youth. I see them as young people in a phase of their life from which they will emerge, and it is better to converse with them than to harrumph at them. They will respond to friendly, non-judgmental conversation, just like anyone. Kids today aren't so different from kids in the past--they're just young in a different time.
    Last edited by lxdude; 03-14-2014 at 06:00 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: syntax
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  10. #30
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,337
    Images
    225
    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    Stone, you are a perceptive young man, and I'm glad to see you calling bullshit on our collective fantasies of the good old days.

    I am a year older than Tom. I did not have any TV-style upbringing. My parents were divorced, and my mom beat me with an electrical cord several times a week, hard enough to break the skin. The neighbors heard it all, but they did what people did back in the 60's- they "minded their own business". I was hardly the only one. Some kids had a father who stopped at the bar on the way home and drank in front of the TV after dinner. Or just stayed at the bar, which to some kids was better than him being home. A classmate of mine wrote a book about the constant physical and psychological abuse she and her sisters received from her cruel father including her being raped starting at age 5, and how she overcame the damage as an adult. It was hard to read, especially knowing that she hid all the pain from us classmates so well. But that's what kids do, they hide it out of fear of humiliation. When her book came out, some other classmates starting relating their experiences, and what I was most stunned at was that some of them had what I thought was happy families. Some externally perfect families hid their realities of drunkenness, abuse of tranquilizers and diet pills, spousal abuse, child abuse and molestation.

    There were plenty of good and happy families then, as there are now. And a substantial number of families in which the kids suffer, just as now.

    The TV portrayal of American life back then, of the Cleavers and the Nelsons and the Bradys, was a portrayal of white suburban life, idealized at that, and had nothing to do with life as it was for millions of minorities and poor whites in this country. There are lots of photographs from those times which depict the reality of life for those millions. Yet so many of my contemporaries seem to forget those, and only remember the TV shows. I like the shows myself- I just don't see them as depicting the whole reality by any stretch.

    The young people of today live in a reality we made. They're figuring out who they are, just as we all did. I took a lot of crap in the early 70's for my long hair- called names, refused service in stores, accused at as young as 14 of being a "drug user", assaulted by scissors-wielding asses (who did not succeed in giving me a haircut). Several years later, long hair was commonplace and no one cared. I don't like piercings and don't care much for tattoos, (though some are spectacular). But it would be asinine of me to pass judgment on the people who have them, as it would mean I learned nothing from my experiences being judged.
    It's easy to say (and I've said it) that the Emo kids don't really have anything to be morose about- that they have had it better than most people, and they don't know what real suffering is. I've heard it said (not that I have any idea) that most of them have had such ordinary lives that being Emo is a way for them to feel something intensely. Maybe they feel lost. I remember being young and feeling lost. They are hardly the first disaffected or disconnected youth. I see them as young people in a phase of their life from which they will emerge, and it is better to converse with them than to harrumph at them. They will respond to friendly, non-judgmental conversation, just like anyone. Kids today aren't so different from kids in the past--they're just young in a different time.
    +1
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

Page 3 of 10 FirstFirst 123456789 ... LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin