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  1. #41
    fotch's Avatar
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    You might want to explore having your lawyer form a small business corporation and being an employee of the corporation. The corporation may ofter some shielding for you.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  2. #42
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    Oh, and be sure to avoid becoming discouraged .
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #43
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    Thanks for all the kind words on both threads mattking
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  4. #44
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    Hey Ektagraphic, all your questions and concerns are intelligent and it is good to be aware of what is needed to be successful. Having been in business for 35+ years, what is routine in setting up a business is just going to be new to someone just starting out.

    Taking pictures is the easy part, staying in business takes commitment. Good Luck.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  5. #45
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Thanks to you too fotch I'm new at the world still being in High School I have lots to learn and pick up along the way.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  6. #46
    fotch's Avatar
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    Holy smokes, I thought your were in college. Well, age doesn't matter. Well, on second thought, young is better than old but old does beat the alternative.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  7. #47
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    If I told you I was a freshmen this year what will you think now
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    Is it possible to have them sign some kind of contract that says that I am not resposable for anything that could happen to them or is insurance still needed?
    You would need to consult a lawyer/insurance broker for definitives. Public liability I would not work without. It is essential and not too expensive. Professional indemnity I would work without, but for individual family commissions only, and with a stipulation in signed contract that I will refund any payment (but no more) in the case of total photographic failure. It doesn't help legal costs if a dispute goes to court, but I would think such an eventuality is incredibly unlikely. If the event is not repeatable or there are extra (say, long travel and overnight) expenses involved, you should be totally insured.

    As Cheryl pointed out creating perceived value is tricky. Just remember that if you are cheap, your clients will be cheap too. You can't on the one hand talk about the virtues of film, and work with cut prices on the other. Cheap and quality are not compatible.

  9. #49

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    To price something you need to start with what market you are targeting. Do you have an idea what you are looking for as a clientelle? That determines three key factors:

    - Size of the market (and what part of it is accessible...understand your competition)
    - What their preferences are (photographic style, Media etc)
    - Current price points in the market for that sort of work

    Then taking this information build up a cost model of what you need to buy in assets, what you need to spend on consumable (not only photographic materials, but also gasoline for transport, any equipment or location you might rent etc) and what your time is worth. That last one is key, since time IS money as the old addage goes. Finally put an overhead on top for time and materials associated with marketing and sales, Insurance etc. Then build a cost model that considers all these things. Consider current market price points for the service and the prints (assume some print sales, but make sure your service price covers you basic overheads and a portion of your time) and do the sum against your costs. This is your likely profit, then make allowances for tax you would need to pay, and the result is your take home profit after tax. Does that number sound reasonable? Remember, this is the money AFTER you have been paid the value of your time, i.e. it's what is called your Discretionary Cash Flow...what you can spend on whatever you like. If the answer is yes, then this is worth it. If not then look for an alternative pricing model/point or a different market segment.

    For example, if there was a market for polaroid simple snapshots in the street and 10 people a day were prepared to pay $40 for each for a portrait of them, and I only need to take one shot for each portrait and hand over the print, this would be a very profitable business...an unlikley market, but I am trying to give you an idea about why the market matters. Understand the market, you understand the business.

    By the way people always struggle with what their time is worth...well take what is called an opportunity cost...what job could you be doing in the time spent and what would you earn. Certainly as a minimum it would be minimum wage.

    Good luck..

    K
    Kal Khogali

    www.kal-khogali.com


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    "Wake up, dream, and photograph what you have seen.
    Don't wake up, photograph, and dream of what could have been."

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    Is it possible to have them sign some kind of contract that says that I am not resposable for anything that could happen to them or is insurance still needed?
    No, not normally, insurance is still needed if you are going to be in a formal business.

    That said if you are working for "film, paper, & chemicals" doing portraits at a street fair your risk is probably low.

    If you take a wedding job though...
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

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