Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,897   Posts: 1,584,334   Online: 850
      
Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 53
  1. #21
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,908
    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    Um... how about keeping it simple and use a 35mm something? Hobby side of photography aside, you'll be working in constrained environment. Small and quiet 35mm may be the best gear to use. If you don't have one, one can be purchased very inexpensively. Maybe a small and slim tripod will be permitted for a quick use? You'll be shooting through two layers of plexiglass anyway, so quality is compromised already.

    Congratulations and I'm so glad she'll going to make it. I'm sure she is a beautiful baby!
    It would be a good idea to have a polarizer filter to use for some of the shots just in case the plexiglass causes glare. But also be advised that the polarizer can also, under the right conditions, show the stress zones in the plexiglass. Therefore, consider taking photographs with and without the polarizer.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  2. #22
    36cm2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Northeast U.S.
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    575
    What Vaughn said +1. I'm actually really surprised that you can take any photos in the NICU. My wife is expecting and our NICU has strict prohibitions on photography for privacy purposes.
    "There is a time and place for all things, the difficulty is to use them only in their proper time and places." -- Robert Henri

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    florida
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,186
    Images
    2
    Platinum/palladium prints are contact printed so the image will be the size of the negative used to print. Negatives can be enlarged either with duplicating film or digitally. Lighting and image quality are among the keys for the beauty of pt prints. Controlling those conditions in the NICU would be impossible. At this time I would settle for a record snap shot and delay the other until the baby is home.

    One of my grandsons was in the NICU for a month after his birth and as eager as I was to make some pictures I deferred until he was about three months old. It was worth the wait and no one complained.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  4. #24
    vpwphoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,139
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    7
    Anything that will hold a Nikkor Micro 55 and a 105 1.8.
    Nuf said!
    I did manage to shoot my daughter at 6 months with 5x7 film!!!

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,286
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by 36cm2 View Post
    What Vaughn said +1. I'm actually really surprised that you can take any photos in the NICU. My wife is expecting and our NICU has strict prohibitions on photography for privacy purposes.
    I was able to photograph my son in the NICU, but it wasn't crowded or hectic and I was shooting nondisruptive cameras (35mm RF, TLR, DSLR without flash). It seems like the kind of thing that would depend greatly on the environment at the time and one's relations with the staff.

    Of the options listed, I'd give a good look at the TLR with a closeup attachment. The Rolleinar sets work well, and 6x6 really is large enough for contact printing.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  6. #26
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,516
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    437
    While tripods would probably be an absolute no-no, you could try a monopod under your RZ or Rollei for added stability. Another great option would be a 3 1/4 x 4 1/4 Speed Graphic. The images would be decently large, and still fit in an envelope for mailing. The camera would be very inexpensive, as most people think of it as a "dead" size, when in fact it's quite easy to work with, as it involves at worst cutting down 4x5 film, but only making a single size trim from both dimensions (3/4" off length and width).

  7. #27
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,908
    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    It seems like the kind of thing that would depend greatly on the environment at the time and one's relations with the staff.
    My experience has been that most neonatal facilities will be tolerant and work with you.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #28
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    Most autofocus would easily focus on the "glass" of the incubator. I would use my Voigtländer Vito CLR which has an extremely silent shutter. Advancing the film makes more noise. No need to frame if you scale-focus.

    My procedure would be: take pictures in a "stealth" fashion. Then talk to someone and ask if you can take pictures inside the room. If they say yes, take pictures in a more normal and accurate manner. YMMV.

    Regarding flash, Glass, be Sirius, what is exactly that babies don't "handle" in a flash? The fact that a newborn cries is certainly a sign of some form of discomfort (maybe due to the new experience, the surprise, or simply an unknown person in front of him) but how, precisely, would a flash cause "pain" to a child? Children must be the most flashed subjects on the planet. They cry for the most mysterious reasons at the most unexpected times. Adults take pictures of them and then make strange utterances, make funny faces, and behave in the most worrying way. That would make me scream. Leave the flash alone

    Anyway, one cannot use flash for a child inside an incubator because the light would bounce over the incubator.

    I have a picture of myself (and my twin) when we are, I presume, less than one year old. It's taken with a flash and I suppose it's the most common picture of all kind of pictures. And it was taken by a professional photographer most likely (my father didn't have a flash, nor my grandfather, and none in the family ever was a photographer). Ah, and the flash was a bit on the left, the typical family flash would have been right on the lens axis.

    EDIT. I "asked the doctor" and that's what he told me:

    http://carefirst.staywellsolutionson...n/72,ATD011008
    Last edited by Diapositivo; 07-19-2011 at 02:09 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  9. #29
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,908
    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    Regarding flash, Glass, be Sirius, what is exactly that babies don't "handle" in a flash? The fact that a newborn cries is certainly a sign of some form of discomfort (maybe due to the new experience, the surprise, or simply an unknown person in front of him) but how, precisely, would a flash cause "pain" to a child? Children must be the most flashed subjects on the planet. They cry for the most mysterious reasons at the most unexpected times. Adults take pictures of them and then make strange utterances, make funny faces, and behave in the most worrying way. That would make me scream. Leave the flash alone
    The problem is 'flash' with neonates seems to be over stimulation of the retina which causes pain. After a few months, although when I worked at Kodak some people that I worked with said 6 months, the infants eyes can handle the flash. Earlier this year when my son-in-law used the flash shortly after birth [no not his birth] and the doctors quietly talked to him about not using flash, I saw someone shoot a photograph with flash through the glass window to take a photograph. A bunch of babies started to cry and one of the staff came out to talk to the visitor.

    I know that by three months I was using a flash at home, but then I was back about six to ten feet with a longer lens.

    The early months are the "all about me" phase and if it is not about food or comfort, generally other outside stimulation does not get attention unless it cause pain or as you point out fear.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #30
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,759
    Images
    40
    An NICU, as the name suggests, is an intense place. If I was a nurse in one and someone fired off a flash, that person would need to go to a proctologist to remove the camera.

    The room(s) are filled with babies, many hanging onto life by a thread. Alarms are constantly going off warning of babies who have stopped breathing (the monitors measure blood oxygen levels) and the babes need to be gently shaken to get them to start breathing again...not to mention a host of other complications that can come along with being a premie.

    The room is also filled worried, stressed parents -- who might be the ones who shove the camera up where the sun never shines instead of a nurse. Id rather take a flash photo of a newborn griz and deal with a momma bear than a human mother who thinks her child has be endangered by some fool with a flash. Even after 14 years, I still get emotional remembering the experience of have three boys weighing about 2.5 pounds in there (and boys have a worse survival rate than girls, everything else being equal).

    So Diopositivo, if you do get in this situation, lube up before using a flash -- it will make camera removal easier...

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin