Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 74,007   Posts: 1,633,596   Online: 1121
      
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 45
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,286
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by 36cm2 View Post
    What Vaughn said +1. I'm actually really surprised that you can take any photos in the NICU. My wife is expecting and our NICU has strict prohibitions on photography for privacy purposes.
    I was able to photograph my son in the NICU, but it wasn't crowded or hectic and I was shooting nondisruptive cameras (35mm RF, TLR, DSLR without flash). It seems like the kind of thing that would depend greatly on the environment at the time and one's relations with the staff.

    Of the options listed, I'd give a good look at the TLR with a closeup attachment. The Rolleinar sets work well, and 6x6 really is large enough for contact printing.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  2. #22
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,725
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    446
    While tripods would probably be an absolute no-no, you could try a monopod under your RZ or Rollei for added stability. Another great option would be a 3 1/4 x 4 1/4 Speed Graphic. The images would be decently large, and still fit in an envelope for mailing. The camera would be very inexpensive, as most people think of it as a "dead" size, when in fact it's quite easy to work with, as it involves at worst cutting down 4x5 film, but only making a single size trim from both dimensions (3/4" off length and width).

  3. #23
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    Most autofocus would easily focus on the "glass" of the incubator. I would use my Voigtländer Vito CLR which has an extremely silent shutter. Advancing the film makes more noise. No need to frame if you scale-focus.

    My procedure would be: take pictures in a "stealth" fashion. Then talk to someone and ask if you can take pictures inside the room. If they say yes, take pictures in a more normal and accurate manner. YMMV.

    Regarding flash, Glass, be Sirius, what is exactly that babies don't "handle" in a flash? The fact that a newborn cries is certainly a sign of some form of discomfort (maybe due to the new experience, the surprise, or simply an unknown person in front of him) but how, precisely, would a flash cause "pain" to a child? Children must be the most flashed subjects on the planet. They cry for the most mysterious reasons at the most unexpected times. Adults take pictures of them and then make strange utterances, make funny faces, and behave in the most worrying way. That would make me scream. Leave the flash alone

    Anyway, one cannot use flash for a child inside an incubator because the light would bounce over the incubator.

    I have a picture of myself (and my twin) when we are, I presume, less than one year old. It's taken with a flash and I suppose it's the most common picture of all kind of pictures. And it was taken by a professional photographer most likely (my father didn't have a flash, nor my grandfather, and none in the family ever was a photographer). Ah, and the flash was a bit on the left, the typical family flash would have been right on the lens axis.

    EDIT. I "asked the doctor" and that's what he told me:

    http://carefirst.staywellsolutionson...n/72,ATD011008
    Last edited by Diapositivo; 07-19-2011 at 01:09 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  4. #24
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,858
    Images
    40
    An NICU, as the name suggests, is an intense place. If I was a nurse in one and someone fired off a flash, that person would need to go to a proctologist to remove the camera.

    The room(s) are filled with babies, many hanging onto life by a thread. Alarms are constantly going off warning of babies who have stopped breathing (the monitors measure blood oxygen levels) and the babes need to be gently shaken to get them to start breathing again...not to mention a host of other complications that can come along with being a premie.

    The room is also filled worried, stressed parents -- who might be the ones who shove the camera up where the sun never shines instead of a nurse. Id rather take a flash photo of a newborn griz and deal with a momma bear than a human mother who thinks her child has be endangered by some fool with a flash. Even after 14 years, I still get emotional remembering the experience of have three boys weighing about 2.5 pounds in there (and boys have a worse survival rate than girls, everything else being equal).

    So Diopositivo, if you do get in this situation, lube up before using a flash -- it will make camera removal easier...

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  5. #25
    Worker 11811's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,628
    Flash is not my best subject. I can use flash if I have to but my best work is done in available/natural light. Consequently, I would avoid using flash, if I could, strictly on those grounds. Further, if you're looking for that sensitive baby portrait, a crying baby would not be in furtherance of that goal. Well... Okay... "Cry pictures" are sometimes cute but they don't always work. They have to be just right. I don't think that's what you're going for, anyway.

    The fact that flash pictures can actually hurt a baby's eyes just takes that option right off the table for me.

    Just a crazy thought. Is there any way you could make a setup in advance and have the baby brought in at the last minute?
    Either in another room or in a quiet corner, get everything ready: Lights, background or tripod if you can get permission.
    Then, bright the baby in for three minutes, do the deed and whisk her right back.

    Slap me down if this next thing pisses you off when I say it but you could play the "distraught parent card."
    Just tell the staff that you might not get another chance to take this photo again.
    (Runs away and hides under a chair.)
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,286
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    The room is also filled worried, stressed parents -- who might be the ones who shove the camera up where the sun never shines instead of a nurse. Id rather take a flash photo of a newborn griz and deal with a momma bear than a human mother who thinks her child has be endangered by some fool with a flash.
    Amen to that. My own experience with the NICU was very low-intensity---he was a little early and had a little trouble breathing, so they kept him in a nearly empty NICU for about a day, until it was clear he was stable---and even that was about as stressful an experience as I ever hope to face.

    Of course the same emotional drive gets involved in the photos, though, right? I vividly remember taking this photo of my son on his first day, and nothing, but *nothing*, was going to get between me and him and the image of that moment. And I think as photographers it behooves us to respect the importance of that...

    So Diopositivo, if you do get in this situation, lube up before using a flash -- it will make camera removal easier...
    ...while still maintaining just this sort of contingency plan. :-)

    In all seriousness, I think flash is a non-starter. Whether or not it can be medically proven to be a real problem, everyone in that situation owes it to one another not to make things any more stressful than they are already.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  7. #27
    mhcfires's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    El Cajon, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    570
    Just use a fast film, (B&W preferred) a big lens (50mm/1.4 at least) and have at it. One or two quick snaps and be done with it. You don't have to be a PITA for the nurses, as an RN I know what it is like to have to deal with recalcitrant family, but I have always been easy to get along with. Be cool, the nurses will be cool.
    Michael Cienfuegos


    If you don't want to stand behind our troops, please feel free to stand in front of them.

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    31
    Images
    1
    Thanks for everyone's advice. Some good ideas!

    Flash is definitely out. The room has very subdued lighting and hushed voices to try and replicate the environment of the womb and allow the babies to try and catch up with their missed time. It is very difficult to get food into a premature baby (my daughter started on 1ml of milk an hour) and the thinking goes that every time a baby is disturbed, they burn energy waving their arms and legs around instead of growing. Available light it is...

    I think moving Charlotte is also out of the question. She is covered in leads which go to half a dozen different alarms and monitors. That said, we are encouraged to take her out of the incubator and hold her skin-to-skin, albeit with leads still attached.

    Finally, bringing in large or tatty equipment would be a no-no. Infection control is very strict, and no coats or bags are allowed in the nursery. Getting into her room involves two hand washes and two applications of alcohol hand rub.

    Current plan is; Shoot on either the Rollei with the #3 close up adapter (on order) or with a Mamiya 645 with a macro tube. Do it whilst Mummy is holding Charlotte to avoid the plexiglas. Use delta 3200 pushed as far as possible in Microphen (extra contrast in the neg is a massive help for platinum printing). Either shoot 3 shots back to back (face, hand, foot?) and contact print a triptych directly, or enlarge twice onto ortho plus and print from 5x4. Simple!

    I'll let you know how I get on, but in the meantime, keep the ideas rolling in!

    Thanks,

    J

  9. #29
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    An NICU, as the name suggests, is an intense place. If I was a nurse in one and someone fired off a flash, that person would need to go to a proctologist to remove the camera.

    The room(s) are filled with babies, many hanging onto life by a thread. Alarms are constantly going off warning of babies who have stopped breathing (the monitors measure blood oxygen levels) and the babes need to be gently shaken to get them to start breathing again...not to mention a host of other complications that can come along with being a premie.

    The room is also filled worried, stressed parents -- who might be the ones who shove the camera up where the sun never shines instead of a nurse. Id rather take a flash photo of a newborn griz and deal with a momma bear than a human mother who thinks her child has be endangered by some fool with a flash. Even after 14 years, I still get emotional remembering the experience of have three boys weighing about 2.5 pounds in there (and boys have a worse survival rate than girls, everything else being equal).

    So Diopositivo, if you do get in this situation, lube up before using a flash -- it will make camera removal easier...

    Vaughn
    My name is Fabrizio, my nickname is Diapositivo, Von.

    In case we really met in such a circumstance, I would just hope for you that intensive care is nearby

    In general, your feelings are certainly not more important that the feeling of a parent wanting to take a picture of his child, a child he might even not see any more. A child is a child for everybody not just for you.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  10. #30
    Worker 11811's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,628
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesDean View Post
    ... That said, we are encouraged to take her out of the incubator and hold her skin-to-skin, albeit with leads still attached. ...

    ... Do it whilst Mummy is holding Charlotte to avoid the plexiglas. ...
    I imagine some really great "Mother & Child" shots coming out of this!

    First, as you say, it avoids background clutter, close angles and glare from the Plexiglass. Second, it might help you with lighting a little bit because you have more freedom of movement, allowing you to get the most out of the little light you have.

    BTW: Can Mom handle a camera? Even if you preset the controls and hand off?
    Don't forget the "Father & Daughter" shot! It's easy to get shutter blind and you might not think of possibilities like this when you are in the moment, concentrating on the viewfinder.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin