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  1. #91

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  2. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    But when viewing something like the picture by Herb Ritts - Fred with tyres, I can more appreciate the artistic merit.
    The iconic photo "Fred With Tires" I think would be said to possibly be erotic and not pornographic. After all the figure is clothed in very baggy ovdralls. To me the photo portrays great physical strength. Today if one wishes to see erotic and borderline line pornography one need only look at today's advertising photography.

    The story behind to photo is said to be that Ritts and a friend were out driving when they experienced car problems. They pulled into a gas station. Fred, who was a student at a local college, happened to be working that day. The rest was history and art.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 05-27-2014 at 07:03 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Well, you all know my attitude to it by now. I have no problem with it in just about any form (pedophilic porn being the obvious exception). But getting back to the original subject, I think there is something essential about the nude in art: we NEED to have it because it serves to expose raw truths about us as humans - there's no hiding behind clothes or costumes. Literally stripped down to the absolute minimum, anything included in a nude must be there for a reason, either as a signifier or a distraction.
    How well said!

    Frankly, the world does not need more pictures of pretty girls without their garments. And the nude in art would seem a desperately tired genre that has run out of things to say. But amazingly it isn't so in at least two ways.

    The nude remains an eternal metaphoric space in which aspects of the human condition can be explored and commented upon. The unclad figure, taken out of humdrum context, becomes every-man or every-woman at any time or at all times. If you have a broad visual statement to make about humanity, uncluttered by the here-and-now, the particular, and the picayune, then the nude is what you should use.

    It is a blessing born of long tradition that most people are familiar with the nude in art. They can accept the surface view, "this is so and so with their clothes off", and then pass beyond to read the underlying message. The tension between the nude as carnal and the nude as sublime has existed for a long time. Praxiteles (4th Century BCE) knew this when carved his Aphrodite for the city fathers of Knidos and employed his mistress, the famous courtesan Phryne, as the model. The city fathers were embarrassed (some knew Phryne "commercially") and grumpy but they paid Praxiteles fee and the statue became the most famous Aphrodite ever. Photography can likewise celebrate the clash between eros, as felt, and logos, as thought, and it can do it with wit and wisdom.

    The second celebration of the nude that will never run dry is celebration of real beauty for its own sake. I think of "What a piece of work is man... Hamlet, Act 2, scene II" and assert that if we cannot admire our common humanity at its best then we fully deserve the miseries of body-denying asceticism. Heaven forfend! Beauty beyond the cliches of fashion and celebrity is everywhere and everywhere fading. The photographer's tout accosting women in the street with "C'mon luv have yer pitcher done. You'll never look more beautiful than today" spoke more truth than he knew. The ancient tombstone inscription "As you are now so once was I. As I am now you soon shall be" is grimly true as well. It is absolutely legitimate to use the photographic time machine to capture beauty in the here and now, a face, a nude, a body asserting a sentiment carnal or chaste, and defend it against an uncaring past and an uncertain future.

    It is no fault of the nude that many (most?) people first encounter the nude "other" in sexual situations and become fixated on the equation between nudity and sexuality. This too is worth exploring, rejecting, accepting, or transcending through art. And that includes the art of photography.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

  4. #94

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    That was a pretty good Philosophy of Art lecture Maris. I thought you were a chemist?
    Nice work. You have a very talented computer.

  5. #95
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    Thanks for the compliment. The pursuits of science and scientific technology were my profession. But they, by themselves, constitute hard bread indeed to nourish a life. The philosophy, study, and practice of art always supplied much needed leavening.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

  6. #96
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    Maris, that is a truly beautiful piece of writing. It should be made a sticky on this forum for whenever this subject comes up (yet) again!

  7. #97

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    Well my pig pen collegue had a play boy centre fold of a girly with staple in navel on interior partition I did not mind in least. My side had an air traffic control map which was 100% work related for the air traffic software we did.

    I said one or the female collegues had threatened to paste a play girl centre fold in its place.

    'You mean a fella without any clothes?'

    'respost deleted to avoid upset to gay males or straight ladies' very risible though

    He removed the centre fold.

  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maris View Post
    How well said!

    Frankly, the world does not need more pictures of pretty girls without their garments. And the nude in art would seem a desperately tired genre that has run out of things to say. But amazingly it isn't so in at least two ways.

    The nude remains an eternal metaphoric space in which aspects of the human condition can be explored and commented upon. The unclad figure, taken out of humdrum context, becomes every-man or every-woman at any time or at all times. If you have a broad visual statement to make about humanity, uncluttered by the here-and-now, the particular, and the picayune, then the nude is what you should use.

    It is a blessing born of long tradition that most people are familiar with the nude in art. They can accept the surface view, "this is so and so with their clothes off", and then pass beyond to read the underlying message. The tension between the nude as carnal and the nude as sublime has existed for a long time. Praxiteles (4th Century BCE) knew this when carved his Aphrodite for the city fathers of Knidos and employed his mistress, the famous courtesan Phryne, as the model. The city fathers were embarrassed (some knew Phryne "commercially") and grumpy but they paid Praxiteles fee and the statue became the most famous Aphrodite ever. Photography can likewise celebrate the clash between eros, as felt, and logos, as thought, and it can do it with wit and wisdom.

    The second celebration of the nude that will never run dry is celebration of real beauty for its own sake. I think of "What a piece of work is man... Hamlet, Act 2, scene II" and assert that if we cannot admire our common humanity at its best then we fully deserve the miseries of body-denying asceticism. Heaven forfend! Beauty beyond the cliches of fashion and celebrity is everywhere and everywhere fading. The photographer's tout accosting women in the street with "C'mon luv have yer pitcher done. You'll never look more beautiful than today" spoke more truth than he knew. The ancient tombstone inscription "As you are now so once was I. As I am now you soon shall be" is grimly true as well. It is absolutely legitimate to use the photographic time machine to capture beauty in the here and now, a face, a nude, a body asserting a sentiment carnal or chaste, and defend it against an uncaring past and an uncertain future.

    It is no fault of the nude that many (most?) people first encounter the nude "other" in sexual situations and become fixated on the equation between nudity and sexuality. This too is worth exploring, rejecting, accepting, or transcending through art. And that includes the art of photography.
    wow - this is where I feel being very Danish: I don't understand most of the above... which I can understand is a shame...

  9. #99

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    Quote Originally Posted by gandolfi View Post
    wow - this is where I feel being very Danish: I don't understand most of the above... which I can understand is a shame...
    Id not worry over much
    Your municipal statues don't have fig leaves.
    The UK statues and Swedish statues have fig leaves

    At least this was true in the parks I've visited.

    Is it general in Denmark?

  10. #100

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    Quote Originally Posted by gandolfi View Post
    yes - but isn't it about how you depict it?

    yes, maybe you are right ..
    Last edited by jnanian; 05-28-2014 at 03:47 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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