Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,219   Posts: 1,532,232   Online: 841
      
Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 58
  1. #21
    Maris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Noosa, Queensland, Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    723
    In my studio 99% of all portraits are done at a distance of 1.5 to 2 metres. Why?

    In "Western" style societies this is the distance that two strangers set when they are engaged, interested, attentive, respectful, but not invasive of personal space. This gap is so familiar and consistent that facial features, ratio of nose to ears, chin to neck, etc, just look "right".

    Once the distance is known framing is organised by choosing the appropriate focal length; long focus for tight face portraits, wide angle for half-figure, and so on.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Greenock (Scotland)
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    45
    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    'If your pictures are not good enough, you're not close enough.'

    Rober Capa
    I believe that was related to war photography, if I am not mistaken.


  3. #23
    tomalophicon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canberra, ACT.
    Shooter
    Sub 35mm
    Posts
    1,562
    Images
    24
    Usually the width of the road between my house and the hot next door neighbour's bedoom window ... Wait, should I be saying this here?

  4. #24
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,060
    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    'If your pictures are not good enough, you're not close enough.'

    Rober Capa
    I have seen variations of that in almost any basic book on composition. One of the most common composition mistakes is to not isolate the subject from distractions.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    New York
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    308
    My studio (spare room) is 15' x 15' and luckily ceilings just as high. If I stand off the model from the background, I usually have 5-7 feet, or closer.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,361
    Quote Originally Posted by photoworks68 View Post
    I believe that was related to war photography, if I am not mistaken.

    Yes. The guys who got too close aren't able to warn us.

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by Maris View Post
    In my studio 99% of all portraits are done at a distance of 1.5 to 2 metres. Why?

    In "Western" style societies this is the distance that two strangers set when they are engaged, interested, attentive, respectful, but not invasive of personal space. This gap is so familiar and consistent that facial features, ratio of nose to ears, chin to neck, etc, just look "right".

    Once the distance is known framing is organised by choosing the appropriate focal length; long focus for tight face portraits, wide angle for half-figure, and so on.
    I like this theory. I'm going to bring this in practice to see if you're right or not.

  8. #28
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,631
    Images
    40
    Far away
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Prairie Creek, Nude.jpg   1FallenRedwood.jpg   Nude,Redwood_Carbon.jpg  
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  9. #29
    Two23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    South Dakota
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    299
    I try to stay at least 25 feet away from my subjects, in case they derail and jump the tracks. My subjects are usually trains.


    Kent in SD

  10. #30
    Trask's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,061
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by artonpaper View Post
    Thinking back on some of Avedon's pictures, I feel that wasn't always the case. Some are obviously in the 5 - 7 ft range. I don't have an example on hand at the moment, when I get to one, I'll give an example, see if anyone agrees.
    Yes, Avedon frequently photographed with a Rolleiflex on a tripod, set up quite close to the subject. Prefocused, almost pre-framed. Avedon could speak with the subject, elicit responses, etc. even as he shot (with a cable release) and advanced the film without the subject being fully aware that the photo had been taken. You can see this, IIRC, on the American Masters show re: Avedon. (I'll confess that I can't quite figure out if he was using a Tele-Rolleiflex, or at times a regular Rollei with a close-up set. I'd tend to think the former is more likely.)

    Here are examples:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails oscar levant avedon.png   Ave2006-11275.jpg  

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin