Switch to English Language Passer en langue franηaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,849   Posts: 1,582,856   Online: 783
      
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    286

    Detroit Eastern Market Street Photos

    So I have been shooting for quite some time but only got into street photography a few years ago. Therefore I was interested in getting some feedback on the photos I took the other day at the Detroit Eastern Market.

    For those who don't know what the Eastern Market is, it's basically a giant open market where people come to sell produce in downtown Detroit. There are a bunch of antique stores around the area too, everything opened in 1891. It's a pretty cool place because a lot of the chain stores moved out of Detroit when the city took a turn for the worse. As a result Detroit is now considered a food desert and many families are forced to shop for food at liquor stores, gas stations, convenience stores, etc. The Eastern Market provides an awesome (healthy) alternative

    Anyway, I don't have a lot of friends who are into photography so I am reaching out to my fellow APUG-ers to let me know what I can do to continue improving.

    All these photos were shot on a Nikon FM loaded with Kodak BW400CN. The lenses used were a 24mm 2.8 and a 50mm 1.8 (both with Hoya Y(K2) filters).

    1


    2


    3


    4


    5


    6


    7


    8


    9

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    286
    10


    11


    12


    13


    14


    15


    16


    17

  3. #3
    CGW
    CGW is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,797
    Really like the mood in these. Some great shots. Watch your composition and backgrounds. Get closer when it serves to isolate what matters in the shot. I love street shooting, too, and have learned a great deal from studying the recently-discovered work of Vivian Maier.

    http://www.vivianmaier.com/

  4. #4
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,510
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    437
    These are a good start, but frankly, this subject seems to cry out for color, not b/w. I'd love to see a lot of these as color photos, especially the ones with food in them. The accordion player is great in b/w, however.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    ɹǝpun uʍop puɐl
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    48
    Colour wont add to them so to me they are obviously b&w images. In digital I see b+w conversions as togs somehow trying to qualify an image as street but usually its to hide bad composition or exposure. In film the same argument does not even apply, the image is taken in b&w therefore it is what it is and therein is the truth of street photography.

    That said ...b&w photography is about light and tone and texture and contrast and I have no hesitation in shooting in midday light however it needs to be because the content overpowers the composition and yet here the content and the stripping effects of the light are almost equal when one needs to overpower one with the other. A photograph needs to feed eyes with a subject or a composition.

    Shopping areas attract shoppers and buskers and what you end up with are shoppers and buskers and they look the same everywhere. I'm guessing too that Detroit is a tricky place to travel about but markets can have their dangers too.

    These images are more travelogue than street but only because they show you passing by and not engaging the scene beyond simply capturing it.
    —-oooO—-
    —-(—)—-
    —–\–(–
    ——\_)-
    ———–Oooo—
    ———–(—-)—
    ————)–/—-
    ———-(_/-
    Ant.
    ɹǝpun uʍop puɐl ǝɥʇ ɯoɹɟ

    oneant.com.au

  6. #6
    zsas's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,962
    Images
    74
    Eastern Market is my #1 favorite visit of Detroit! Thanks for your sharing.

    Quote Originally Posted by oneANT View Post
    These images are more travelogue than street but only because they show you passing by and not engaging the scene beyond simply capturing it.
    I respectfully disagree with the above statement. Photographs 2 and 6 completely show the photographer engagaing wonderfully with the market than mere documentarian.

    Top notch OP, keep seeing and inspiring others with your great sharing here!
    Andy

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    286
    First off, thank you to everyone who took time to look at these photos and comment on them. Everything you guys said was great in terms of letting me know what I did right and what I can improve upon.

    Quote Originally Posted by oneANT View Post
    Colour wont add to them so to me they are obviously b&w images. In digital I see b+w conversions as togs somehow trying to qualify an image as street but usually its to hide bad composition or exposure. In film the same argument does not even apply, the image is taken in b&w therefore it is what it is and therein is the truth of street photography.

    That said ...b&w photography is about light and tone and texture and contrast and I have no hesitation in shooting in midday light however it needs to be because the content overpowers the composition and yet here the content and the stripping effects of the light are almost equal when one needs to overpower one with the other. A photograph needs to feed eyes with a subject or a composition.

    Shopping areas attract shoppers and buskers and what you end up with are shoppers and buskers and they look the same everywhere. I'm guessing too that Detroit is a tricky place to travel about but markets can have their dangers too.

    These images are more travelogue than street but only because they show you passing by and not engaging the scene beyond simply capturing it.
    I really like what you said about the use of b&w in digital vs film photography. I would venture out to say that FlyingCamera said what he said because I posted 17 photos there is a lot of black and white to look at. But I do think that b&w was justified here because I think it allows the viewer to concentrate more on tone and texture. Since it's at a market, colors are very repetitive and I think color would be a little too overpowering.

    On the topic of travelogue vs. street photography, I noticed that I was forced to use my 28mm more than my 50mm and as a result could not get as close as I needed to since I am used to working with the angle of view given by a 35mm or 50mm lens. The reason I was using my 28mm more often was because I needed to zone focus and the 28mm gave a wider range of distances that would be in focus.

    I do have to say that I disagree with your definition of street photography needing to engage with a subject, there are quite a few very well known "street" photographers out there who do not engage a subject when photographing him/her. Not saying my work is anywhere near his level, but the infamous Bruce Gildan comes to mind.


    Quote Originally Posted by zsas View Post
    Eastern Market is my #1 favorite visit of Detroit! Thanks for your sharing.

    I respectfully disagree with the above statement. Photographs 2 and 6 completely show the photographer engagaing wonderfully with the market than mere documentarian.

    Top notch OP, keep seeing and inspiring others with your great sharing here!
    Thanks, I really appreciate the kind words. Like I said Eastern Market is a really great place not only because there are a lot of interesting people there, but because it's doing something really positive for the community. To add to the list of photos I felt I engaged the subjects, I feel that 15 also required me to establish a short rapport with the subject (even though like I mentioned above, I personally do not feel that necessarily definies a street photograph).

    I do wish I was able to use my 50mm more that day because it provides a field of view that I am comfortable with. If anything I guess this was some good practive using a wider lens for street photos

  8. #8
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,510
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    437
    Tron- the reason I said I think this cries out for color is exactly the reason you cited for not doing color- you can use the repetition of color as a pattern, and use selective focus to make the color abstract. It's another way of looking at it. And posting 17 images is far from overwhelming. I'm actually not seeing a cohesive visual thread in these images - you've got your subject matter, Eastern Market, but your shots are scattershot. You've got some that are very much about the people. Some are about the physical place. Some are about activities. I'd like to see you develop one of these ideas more - look at it as a building, or perhaps a photo-essay on the musicians and performers. Or maybe it's about the food and products that are available there. You talked about how Eastern Market is a place city-dwellers go to get things that they can't find otherwise, like produce or fresh meats. SHOW us that story, don't tell it in words.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    ɹǝpun uʍop puɐl
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by tron_ View Post

    I really like what you said about the use of b&w in digital vs film photography. I would venture out to say that FlyingCamera said what he said because I posted 17 photos there is a lot of black and white to look at. But I do think that b&w was justified here because I think it allows the viewer to concentrate more on tone and texture. Since it's at a market, colors are very repetitive and I think color would be a little too overpowering.
    I'm just starting now on b&w film. My freezer is full of Tri-X that I bought here on Apug (thanks Karl), next job is to subscribe because I think I'm going to live here for a while. I'm contemplating how to use the film which is simply overcome by you by just doing it so you are already ahead of my game. Its not easy, I can see that. If I'm going to carry both film and digital bodies I'm going to have to be a bit of Jeckyll and Hyde.
    There is a consensus now that street has no definition or that it at least has boundaries that stretch and contract but it still has its edges. A simple logic, if it has no edges then its nothing and we know this isnt true. There are arguments between photographers about what it is or isnt but as someone said in the 'what is street?' thread ...its easier to say what isnt.

    While many have difficulty defining it and thinking that it has no edges, it is by its own nature ...defined but so many are diluting it and many others are confused about its meaning and think its photographs taken in the street.

    Its funny but b&w has always been the domain of street and digital users will happily convert and add grain but there is another step that they neglect ...they never print it.
    To anyone that wants to challenge the definition I'll just ask ...are you willing to print it, frame it and hang it on the wall. It doesn't have to be in focus or even exposed correctly which is borne out by the hundreds of golden age photographs that are already on walls.
    Quote Originally Posted by tron_ View Post
    On the topic of travelogue vs. street photography, I noticed that I was forced to use my 28mm more than my 50mm and as a result could not get as close as I needed to since I am used to working with the angle of view given by a 35mm or 50mm lens. The reason I was using my 28mm more often was because I needed to zone focus and the 28mm gave a wider range of distances that would be in focus.
    The wides are used to get closer, the longer lenses are for compressing and isolating, the wider are not so much for wider scenes as they might be used in landscape but deeper ones as they are used in street. I use 21, 28 35, 50 & 100. That you are zone focusing suggest that you are being a bit covert and the price for that is composition. Its a great skill to center a subject but it tends to isolate the subject without consideration of the whole scene. The whole scene is the photograph.
    Quote Originally Posted by tron_ View Post
    I do have to say that I disagree with your definition of street photography needing to engage with a subject, there are quite a few very well known "street" photographers out there who do not engage a subject when photographing him/her. Not saying my work is anywhere near his level, but the infamous Bruce Gildan comes to mind.
    Gilden never comes to my mind. Also you are wrong about not engaging ...look at their expressions or even the lack of. He shoves it in their faces to shove their faces into yours when you view them. It brutish but its a technique. When I refer to subject I should re-phrase, the subject is the photograph, the result after the picture is taken, it includes all elements in a photograph and depending on those elements is how we take the picture. FL, angle of view, colour, light and so on. Street is everything in the one image and not so unlike landscape. In a landscape we might have a tree, a hill, some or a lot of sky, we might have some emotional content like sunset or dawn or fog or rain and with these combinations a photographer will make a decision of how best to photograph the scene ...this is street. That decision is then visible in the photograph, a low shutter speed to explore the shadows or to blur the movement, a wide lens to exploit the depth, but the point is that these things become evident. Its also how we get to see the mind of the photographer in an image. Step into a forest and without consideration of the scene, press the shutter. The result is the same in the street and this is the difference between street photography and photography in the street.

    Pics #1 and #5 are what I'd define as street and I thought it odd that some might pick #2 and #6 as they focused on my reference to subject and not at all to 'street'. Pic #5 was also why I made some reference to safety. Its an emotive image and sometimes with these we need to be careful. If its simply someone tired and there was never any danger then THIS is STREET, where a photographer influences or controls what we BELIEVE we are looking at ...and we want to look and question and wonder.
    Last edited by oneANT; 07-18-2012 at 08:57 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    —-oooO—-
    —-(—)—-
    —–\–(–
    ——\_)-
    ———–Oooo—
    ———–(—-)—
    ————)–/—-
    ———-(_/-
    Ant.
    ɹǝpun uʍop puɐl ǝɥʇ ɯoɹɟ

    oneant.com.au



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin