Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 73,052   Posts: 1,611,152   Online: 953
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11
    Zedwardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    103
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Jaf-Photo View Post
    Congratulations! The shots look good. Superia is a much better film than the price tag would have you believe. I think it's the number one price/performance film. Colour reproduction in Superia 200 is a bit desaturated but it's accurate and therefore easy to increase saturation if you want.

    Superia 200 is actually my preferred film for industrial shots.
    The right color tone and in bright light even Superia 200 will pop with color. I took these today.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 40950021.JPG   40950022.JPG  
    Last edited by Zedwardson; 07-10-2014 at 07:41 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    496
    Quote Originally Posted by Zedwardson View Post
    Noted - I am spending right now something like 4x the cost of the film to get it developed. Of course, I have not really price checked, as the test photos are just going to a minilab who equipment does not eat film for breakfast.
    That's a lot, unless it includes good scans too.

    A medium size C41 kit equates to about $1 per film.

    The sunlit shots look good. I still like to saturate a bit more and I think it half looks like a slide film when you do.

    Here's one I did earlier (Superia 200 35mm):
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	image.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	1.02 MB 
ID:	90844
    Last edited by Jaf-Photo; 07-11-2014 at 01:22 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    37
    Quote Originally Posted by Zedwardson View Post
    Noted - I am spending right now something like 4x the cost of the film to get it developed. Of course, I have not really price checked, as the test photos are just going to a minilab who equipment does not eat film for breakfast.
    It's worth giving home processing a go if you already have some equipment, can pick it up off eBay cheap or just want to invest for the future. I've just started doing C41 in the kitchen sink and it is very rewarding, although a bit trickier than B&W. My advice would be to buy a small chemical kit (10 films or so) to see if you like it. Water baths and rotary processors make it easier, but are not essential, but a good accurate thermometer is critical for C41. Expect to make a mess of the first few rolls!

  4. #14
    Zedwardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    103
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Jaf-Photo View Post
    That's a lot, unless it includes good scans too.

    A medium size C41 kit equates to about $1 per film.

    The sunlit shots look good. I still like to saturate a bit more and I think it half looks like a slide film when you do.

    Here's one I did earlier (Superia 200 35mm):
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	image.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	1.02 MB 
ID:	90844
    Very nice photo, it also works well if you make it black and white, as it does shadows quite well.

    I went to a local drug store to get developed and a CD, and the first time it was 5 bucks, which to me seemed like it was a fair price. two days later they charged me 10 bucks and that is way to high for no prints from a drugstore. I will be looking around for a good place to develop c-41. I may very well develop my own later, but I am so rusty that I better develop some B&W before going full color.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin