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  1. #51
    lensworker's Avatar
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    Here's one outlook

    Quote Originally Posted by Shaggysk8 View Post
    Don't get any other Camera just grow some balls!
    Here's Eric Kim's take on it -
    If I could define street photography, I would define it as the act of taking photos of people in public urban areas in a candid manner. This means that when it comes to street photography, you don’t ask your subjects to pose for you. Instead of asking people to take their photo, you simply go up to them and take their photo. In addition, street photography integrates the people and their environment. To use an analogy, I think of street photography as a play, with the actors interacting with their stage in an interesting way.

    Street photography also relies heavily on capturing “the decisive moment“. This means that the timing of the images is what typically makes it special–whether you got catch a person having a certain expression on their face or having a person doing something uncanny at a certain moment.

    When I think of street portraiture, I would say that it is included under the general category of street photography–but it is its own sub-sect. Therefore the two are not mutually exclusive. Furthermore, I would further categorize street portraiture in two sections as well: posed vs candid. Although capturing posed street portraiture can capture strong images (think of The Satorialist), the truly exceptional images are those which are captured candidly (think Thomas Leuthard).

    Now what makes capturing candid street portraits inherently better than capturing posed street portraits? Well to start off, it takes guts to take photos of people in public (without asking their permission). Frankly speaking, I think that street photography is 80% having the balls to go out in public and shoot strangers while only 20% is skill.
    Link: http://erickimphotography.com/blog/2...he-difference/

    I think he's on the right track.
    "My idea of a good life is that I wake up in the morning, go out and look around and make four rolls of film a day." - Josef Koudelka

    "There is only you and your camera. The limitations in your photography are in yourself, for what we see is what we are." - Ernst Haas

    "Nothing happens when you sit at home. I always make it a point to carry a camera with me at all times…I just shoot at what interests me at that moment." – Elliott Erwitt

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by lensworker View Post
    Anyone can make street photos from a "safe" distance - and they will end up with mundane images with no clear subject and no visual impact.
    I'd have to disagree with this statement. I'm not a big fan of "street", but think Paul Strand created an amazing image, which certainly isn't mundane, although shot from a "safe" distance:
    http://iconicphotos.wordpress.com/20...y-paul-strand/

  3. #53
    lensworker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    I'd have to disagree with this statement. I'm not a big fan of "street", but think Paul Strand created an amazing image, which certainly isn't mundane, although shot from a "safe" distance:
    http://iconicphotos.wordpress.com/20...y-paul-strand/
    You are right about Strand's Wall Street image - it is a great image with visual impact - and it was indeed made at a "safe" distance, although there is no commentary on the lens used or his distance from the subject matter when he made the image..

    This image just goes to show that there are no rules in street photography.
    "My idea of a good life is that I wake up in the morning, go out and look around and make four rolls of film a day." - Josef Koudelka

    "There is only you and your camera. The limitations in your photography are in yourself, for what we see is what we are." - Ernst Haas

    "Nothing happens when you sit at home. I always make it a point to carry a camera with me at all times…I just shoot at what interests me at that moment." – Elliott Erwitt

  4. #54
    sdotkling's Avatar
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    I think the whole genre is nonsensical. In my mind there is no such thing as 'street photography'. It is simply photography Out In The World, and if you live with people, they will naturally appear in your photographs of your world. Is it 'street' to photograph a farmer on his tractor? Or is it only 'street' when the same farmer goes to the feed store in town? What if the store is in the city? These are all artificial categories where none need exist at all.

  5. #55
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdotkling View Post
    I think the whole genre is nonsensical. In my mind there is no such thing as 'street photography'. It is simply photography Out In The World, and if you live with people, they will naturally appear in your photographs of your world. Is it 'street' to photograph a farmer on his tractor? Or is it only 'street' when the same farmer goes to the feed store in town? What if the store is in the city? These are all artificial categories where none need exist at all.
    What would you prefer? "Public?" "Civic?" "Environmental?" "Candid?" "Urban?" Your "out in the world" doesn't exactly bring clarity or specificity to street photography. Not liking it is cool but don't trash it in the process. Try checking out the recently-discovered work of Vivian Maier and see what you think:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWEDOnBfDUI

  6. #56
    lensworker's Avatar
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    Just do it

    Quote Originally Posted by sdotkling View Post
    I think the whole genre is nonsensical. In my mind there is no such thing as 'street photography'. It is simply photography Out In The World, and if you live with people, they will naturally appear in your photographs of your world. Is it 'street' to photograph a farmer on his tractor? Or is it only 'street' when the same farmer goes to the feed store in town? What if the store is in the city? These are all artificial categories where none need exist at all.
    If the photographs are made on a street or sidewalk, it's "street photography."
    If the hypothetical farmer is on his tractor on his farm, it's "documentary photography."
    If the hypothetical farmer is at the feed store, it's also "documentary photography."
    If the hypothetical farmer is driving his tractor down the street, it's "street photography."
    That's how I think of it.

    The name tag you put on this type of photography is not that important; what is important is that we get out there with our cameras and make those street/documentary/sidewalk/parking lot/city park/farmer's market/county fair/whatever photographs and not sit in front of our computers for hours/days/weeks/months arguing about the name of it
    (hence my low post count).

    Moral of the story: Call it whatever you want - just get out and do it.
    "My idea of a good life is that I wake up in the morning, go out and look around and make four rolls of film a day." - Josef Koudelka

    "There is only you and your camera. The limitations in your photography are in yourself, for what we see is what we are." - Ernst Haas

    "Nothing happens when you sit at home. I always make it a point to carry a camera with me at all times…I just shoot at what interests me at that moment." – Elliott Erwitt

  7. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarter View Post
    I would like to see what do you guys think of him.
    I like two things about his work:

    1. He's not taking pictrues of the back of peoples heads like many street photographers seem to do
    2. He dares to not use wide-angle and include everything under the sun in his imagery... his images clearly have a subject.

    I didn't find too much interesting, however, and gave it a glance but wouldn't go back for more. Most of the images have a totally "detached" and lifeless appearance.

  8. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by lensworker View Post
    If the photographs are made on a street or sidewalk, it's "street photography."
    If the hypothetical farmer is on his tractor on his farm, it's "documentary photography."
    If the hypothetical farmer is at the feed store, it's also "documentary photography."
    If the hypothetical farmer is driving his tractor down the street, it's "street photography."
    That's how I think of it.

    just get out and do it.


    And if the hypothetical farmer driving his tractor down the street knocks someone over.....is it Press photography?

    Agree with the general drift, it's a bit silly trying to categorise every form of photography...I'm sure the greatest "street photographer" of them all. HCB, would have slated the term as being nonsensical.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarter View Post
    I am glad to see someone who doesnt adher to specific rule and make photo according to personal technique. I would like to see what do you guys think of him.
    As I am sure has already been said somewhere above, the most important rule is that there are no rules.

    And the next thing to bear in mind is that if there were rules/formulas then everybody would follow then in an attempt to be successful. The results would then become so predictable that those rules would quickly be replaced by "anti-rules" - people deliberately violating the rules just to stand out.

    Carry on, have fun, do what you think pushes your creative limits
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  10. #60
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    What are the rules for pickpockets ?
    Ben

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