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  1. #131
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Richard, does Joe public really think like this? If you point a lens at them from whatever camera, I doubt if they are evaluating it’s OK with an old camera, but not with digital.
    Not my experience; it's more limited but seems to agree with Joe's. I see people avoiding those with DSLRs, ignoring but not asking to be photographed with my 35mm SLRs, and approaching me to ask about and sometimes asked to be photographed with my TLR. My Mamiya 645 looks more like some kind of big digital and is similarly viewed a bit askance. Setting up the 4x5 often attracts people but I don't typically carry it down the street so I can't say about that for "street" but getting a Graphic with working rangefinder that I can shoot handheld is on the "someday I'll do that" list.

  2. #132

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Richard, does Joe public really think like this? If you point a lens at them from whatever camera, I doubt if they are evaluating it’s OK with an old camera, but not with digital.
    Clive,
    as I said I do not do a lot street photography in the sense of photographing people going about getting on with their lives, but my experiance at street events both over here and in France is the same, I have seen people turning away from the digi look SLR's etc but happily letting me take their photographs with my old folders and tlrs, it has happened time and again, and more often than not we end up talking about the cameras I am using, memories come from them about, in some cases, the cameras they used when they were younger, sometimes their fathers or grandfathers using this or that camera,even when, on the od occasion, I have approached people in the street, I would always have my cameras on view, and they nearly always say yes, then want to know about the cameras, how old they are etc, I personally think their is some sort of old world charm about these cameras,Remember I always do people the courtesy of asking people first and making sure they see the camera, and a rollei or a folder just look old, antique, and as often been said to me over the years, safe somehow, you have to take your time,not just fire off and then stare at the display to see if you have got something, I can't tell you why, but I have only experianced this since my love affair with 50+ year old cameras, all that I use now.
    When I used so called Modern cameras such as the AF Slr's and my Bronica etr, I more often than not would get a firm no or people trying to avoid looking at the lens, these days it is just the oppisite, maybe these cameras just look so totally different to those that most people use today, something from a more relaxed and happier past, I don't know, all I know is that here and where I go in France there seems little resistence to the charms of ''oldworld'' cameras.

    Richard

  3. #133
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Richard, as I have only ever shot street photography with old cameras, I have never been able to compare the experience of old and new you speak of and therefore accept what you say. I was just surprised that the general public are that perceptive about what to us is a specialised knowledge.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  4. #134
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    They generally don't know much about it. But a DSLR, a P&S digital, and to some extent 35mm SLRs and P&S cameras all look like cameras to them. Most older designs, TLRs, press cameras, medium format rangefinders etc. look either old or, if clearly pretty new, at least quite odd to them. Medium format cameras with grips, eye level finders, motors etc. (my 645 Pro has all three) can easily be confused for modern medium format digital - they might not know the words but they have an idea of "digital pro camera" - or even digital video cameras.

    Cameras that look old, whether they are or not, seem to get a nicer welcome.

  5. #135

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    They generally don't know much about it. But a DSLR, a P&S digital, and to some extent 35mm SLRs and P&S cameras all look like cameras to them. Most older designs, TLRs, press cameras, medium format rangefinders etc. look either old or, if clearly pretty new, at least quite odd to them. Medium format cameras with grips, eye level finders, motors etc. (my 645 Pro has all three) can easily be confused for modern medium format digital - they might not know the words but they have an idea of "digital pro camera" - or even digital video cameras.

    Cameras that look old, whether they are or not, seem to get a nicer welcome.
    Roger, that is my point in a nutshell, the average man or woman in the street, without the knowledge that we as photographers have, seeing the folders, old fixed lens cameras or Tlrs, that I, and many others use, see is a nice old camera, very often one of the first thing someone will say to me is what a lovely old camera, It is very rare for me to go out with a camera without someone wanting to talk about ''that lovely old camera'' they are not seen as a threat, and you are not seen as a threat, as someone with a '' modern'' SLr camera,
    Richard

  6. #136
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Richard, does Joe public really think like this? If you point a lens at them from whatever camera, I doubt if they are evaluating it’s OK with an old camera, but not with digital.
    At the state fair last year I was using a 4x5 Pacemaker Crown Graphic for walkaround people photographs. Not a single compaint. Rather, it was difficult to achieve anything other than wide smiles and/or friendly waves of the hand. Almost impossible to get anything unposed.

    At one point while walking along I had a young lady actually grab my arm from behind to stop me. Her request? Could she use her DSLR to image me pretending to photograph her friend using the Crown. THAT was an unexpected twist. Of course I said yes and dutifully posed. That Crown was a better ice-breaker than anything used by the US Coast Guard.

    Old (or old looking) cameras make a huge difference. It's an ancient antique, so you can't possibly be a threat.

    Ken
    "When making a portrait, my approach is quite the same as when I am portraying a rock. I do not wish to impose my personality upon the sitter, but, keeping myself open to receive reactions from his own special ego, record this with nothing added: except of course when I am working professionally, when money enters in,—then for a price, I become a liar..."

    — Edward Weston, Daybooks, Vol. II, February 2, 1932

  7. #137

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    I have found that many people are annoyed by digital cameras, but feel strangely appreciated when someone takes their picture with a really old-looking ("antique" to their eyes), beat-up analogue camera. They seem to think that using such a camera makes one an artist, and they want to be included in the 'artwork' that is created.
    And the sign said, "long haired freaky people need not apply"

  8. #138
    cliveh's Avatar
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    You are deluded, they don't even notice.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  9. #139
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Hi Walter,

    I can't speak for the digital side. I've never owned or even used one. But the Crown was an amazing conversation starter.

    I'd release the shutter, usually also firing a Sunpak 544 for fill on a sunny day,* and people would immediately head straight for me. Not to chew me out for intruding. But to excitedly ask, "How old is that camera? Where'd you get it?" Followed by, "That's so cool!" And once in a while, "Can you send me a copy of the picture?"

    This year (beginning next Thursday, actually) I'm going to go with a Fuji GF670. As an old-fashioned looking bellows folder I'm hoping for similar non-threatening reactions by my subjects. But this time with all of the modern features for me. And no heavy 4x5 holders to carry.

    Ken

    * Makes life easier for me in the darkroom.
    "When making a portrait, my approach is quite the same as when I am portraying a rock. I do not wish to impose my personality upon the sitter, but, keeping myself open to receive reactions from his own special ego, record this with nothing added: except of course when I am working professionally, when money enters in,—then for a price, I become a liar..."

    — Edward Weston, Daybooks, Vol. II, February 2, 1932

  10. #140

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    Compose as much as you possibly can before you even take up the camera, shoot quick, walk along as nothing has happened. Most people do not notice until after you've shot, if at all, unless you stay and fiddle around for too long.

    I live in France, here it's illegal to use pictures with peoples faces in public without their explicit permission.... Lot's of people seems to know about this, so the only way to go here, unless you want pictures of people posing, is to be fast and discrete.

    I wear a hat, sunglasses, and have my 35mm SLR around my neck hanging down in front of me so I look like a tourist. Perfect disguise... (plus that I am way taller than any french person I've ever met, and blond (scandinavian) so I really look like I dont belong here...).
    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"



 

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