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  1. #141

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    I have found that many people are annoyed by digital cameras, but feel strangely appreciated when someone takes their picture with a really old-looking ("antique" to their eyes), beat-up analogue camera. They seem to think that using such a camera makes one an artist, and they want to be included in the 'artwork' that is created.
    And the sign said, "long haired freaky people need not apply"

  2. #142
    cliveh's Avatar
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    You are deluded, they don't even notice.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #143
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Hi Walter,

    I can't speak for the digital side. I've never owned or even used one. But the Crown was an amazing conversation starter.

    I'd release the shutter, usually also firing a Sunpak 544 for fill on a sunny day,* and people would immediately head straight for me. Not to chew me out for intruding. But to excitedly ask, "How old is that camera? Where'd you get it?" Followed by, "That's so cool!" And once in a while, "Can you send me a copy of the picture?"

    This year (beginning next Thursday, actually) I'm going to go with a Fuji GF670. As an old-fashioned looking bellows folder I'm hoping for similar non-threatening reactions by my subjects. But this time with all of the modern features for me. And no heavy 4x5 holders to carry.

    Ken

    * Makes life easier for me in the darkroom.
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  4. #144

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    Compose as much as you possibly can before you even take up the camera, shoot quick, walk along as nothing has happened. Most people do not notice until after you've shot, if at all, unless you stay and fiddle around for too long.

    I live in France, here it's illegal to use pictures with peoples faces in public without their explicit permission.... Lot's of people seems to know about this, so the only way to go here, unless you want pictures of people posing, is to be fast and discrete.

    I wear a hat, sunglasses, and have my 35mm SLR around my neck hanging down in front of me so I look like a tourist. Perfect disguise... (plus that I am way taller than any french person I've ever met, and blond (scandinavian) so I really look like I dont belong here...).
    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"

  5. #145
    Maris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    You are deluded, they don't even notice.
    cliveh is right. It's amazing what people don't register.

    I have found that using a big camera on a tripod makes me transparent when doing street photography.

    I set up by prefocussing and framing on an interesting spot, shop window, ticket booth, fountain, and the like, where interesting looking people may do quirky things. I watch the unfolding scene attentively but casually and I never look at anyone through the camera. Sometimes the reflection in the lens filter tells me my "target" is in the right spot. Because I fuss with the camera controls, make meter readings, occasionally press the cable release, wind the film while standing in front of the camera, no one knows (or seems to care) when I have made an exposure or who has been photographed; not even the small, easily bored, transient crowd that pauses to watch what I do!

    My most "conspicuous" camera is the Mamiya RB 67, a TLR is even less visible, and the 8x10 view camera may as well not be there at all. City crowds mind their own business. If they do not perceive themselves to be in a predator/prey relationship to the guy with the camera they move on without flinching. Drunks passed out in gutters get the same treatment; they may be seen but are not looked at.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

  6. #146

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    Have you considered using a telephoto? Harry Callahan did some great long lens candid photos on the street. It's also rarely done and might give you the edge on that oh-so-typical wide angle stuff.
    https://d30dcznuokq8w8.cloudfront.ne...ll_570x382.jpg

  7. #147
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    Have you considered using a telephoto? Harry Callahan did some great long lens candid photos on the street. It's also rarely done and might give you the edge on that oh-so-typical wide angle stuff.
    https://d30dcznuokq8w8.cloudfront.ne...ll_570x382.jpg
    Street shooting with long lenses is more like spying and if you think that people sometimes react badly to normal street shooting if they catch you doing it with a long telephoto lens you'll get mobbed, and that "oh so typical wide angle stuff" has a sense of involvement that can't be obtained with long lenses.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 08-19-2012 at 02:35 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  8. #148

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    Street shooting with long lenses is more like spying and if you think that people sometimes react badly to normal street shooting if they catch you doing it with a long telephoto lens you'll get mobbed, and that "oh so typical wide angle stuff" has a sense of involvement that can't be obtained with long lenses.
    There really is no way of getting around the suspicion that people have for photographers now. Long lens or not, I think it's just a case of being forthright in your approach. Looking presentable and perhaps clean shaven helps too! Leave the trench coat at home. I have to say that the Callahan images have a unique intimacy that you don't often see in street photography. Have a look at Michael Wolf's 'Tokyo Compression' series too. The involved or 'caught in the middle of a circus' approach has been done to death, there's little left to say.

  9. #149
    ColdEye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    There really is no way of getting around the suspicion that people have for photographers now. Long lens or not, I think it's just a case of being forthright in your approach. Looking presentable and perhaps clean shaven helps too! Leave the trench coat at home. I have to say that the Callahan images have a unique intimacy that you don't often see in street photography. Have a look at Michael Wolf's 'Tokyo Compression' series too. The involved or 'caught in the middle of a circus' approach has been done to death, there's little left to say.
    +1

    I looked at the Tokyo Compression and it's really refreshing to see. I also agree that using telephotos for street stuff is a nice way to have a different view. From what I see now this genre is too flooded with up close and in your face pictures.

  10. #150
    Benoît99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Felinik View Post
    (...)

    I live in France, here it's illegal to use pictures with peoples faces in public without their explicit permission.... Lot's of people seems to know about this, so the only way to go here, unless you want pictures of people posing, is to be fast and discrete.
    "...peut-on photographier dans un lieu public ? La réponse est oui, c’est la diffusion sans autorisation de ces photos qui est interdite." http://www.eschon.com/photographie-d...loi-en-france/

    Translation: Can you take pictures in a public place? The answer is yes; it is publishing such photos without permission that is prohibited.

    For more information, see the follow site on photography and the law in France:
    http://blog.droit-et-photographie.com/



 

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