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  1. #31
    MaximusM3's Avatar
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    That's part of the gig sometimes. I can honestly say that I certainly received more negative feedback when I have attempted street shooting, in the past, with a big SLR or DSLR (and forget about MF obviously). I now exclusively use my M3 and an old Summicron. I rarely get noticed and, when I do, 99% of the times is a smile (maybe it's because I'm so handsome...just kidding).
    Two weeks ago I was in NYC shooting some Kodachrome 25 and noticed this pretty young lady, with a beautiful flowery yellow dress and a feather in her hair. She looked like straight out of the late '60s. I was using a 50mm and get as close as possible, snapped a couple, then she turned around, smiled, I smiled back, and let me snap two more. Another guy who noticed that, tried to get a shot with a Canon DSLR fitted with one of those cannons...he got the finger as soon as he lifted the camera to his eye. I don't think he got a shot off.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by codester View Post
    First, don't shoot homeless people. It's cheap and hardly ever makes for good street photography.
    The exceptions, IMHO, are mainly cases of portraiture, like Bill Jay's "Men Like Me". It's the difference between "shooting HOMELESS people" and "shooting homeless PEOPLE".

    Personally, I don't seem to have the right body language for street shooting; people invariably notice me, and while they don't get confrontational they usually turn away. I've basically given up trying, except for the occasional "environmental portrait" type of shot.

    ISTR that in a previous thread on this, someone mentioned using a TLR, putting a bit of black tubing on the focus knob, and facing as if *that* were the lens, so people thought they were shooting 90 degrees off from where they were. It's a clever idea.

    Finally, I'd like to note that the search page truncated the title of this thread to "Street photography without pissing", and my immediate reaction was "well, I've never had *that* problem!"

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  3. #33
    rthomas's Avatar
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    I haven't done much street photography, in spite of being very interested in the genre. I've tried the telephoto lens thing and I don't like it, it makes me feel like a paparazzi which I definitely am not.

    The best shots I have made in this style were done with either a Nikon FG and a 50mm f/1.8 Series E or 35mm f/2.8, a Yashica 635 TLR, or an Olympus Stylus Epic. Nobody seemed to find these cameras objectionable. I've even had a few people look right at me and smile! Especially with the Olympus, nobody paid any attention to that camera. I preset my exposure and focus, and just take the photo.

    Sometimes I ask permission, and if I don't get it I just keep walking. The only time I had a problem on the street I WASN'T actually taking the "gentleman's" picture.

  4. #34
    MattKing's Avatar
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    When I was a lot younger, I worked as a photographer for a University newspaper that published three times a week. I shot a lot of photographs of people without first asking permission.

    My favourite response? -

    It wasn't strictly a "Street" circumstance, but it was certainly a photograph taken without warning.

    It was taken at a well advertised and very well attended talk in one of the largest auditoriums on campus.

    The speaker responded to my impromptu photographing of him with a big wink.

    It was Yousuf Karsh
    Last edited by MattKing; 09-09-2010 at 01:25 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #35
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    Street photography, for some people, seems to be like getting a needle...the anticipation is worse than the actual thing itself.

    Just do it. If someone objects enough to say something, be simple and straightforward. I've been doing this in my downtown for over 2 years now, and haven't had an objection. I've struck up a few conversations, but never a problem.
    Be at ease, know what you're doing and more importantly why.

    Most times I just wander and shoot if something catches my eye. I pre-focus and have my settings right beforehand. I'm stealthy but I'm not dishonest. I'm part of the passing scenery just like everybody else is. Beyond that, I don't know...you gotta just go out and do it.

  6. #36

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    Be an old guy, use a twin lens preferably with a strap in case you have to use it as a weapon and give them a "Jack Nickleson" type smile.

    I prefer landscape but some times people being themselves can't be beat. I've never had a problem - just blend in and be respectful, a smile and a nod usually does the trick.

    http://jeffreyglasser.com/

  7. #37
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    Street-photography can be on of the most rewarding and the most frustrating things to do.
    But the your main weapon is your smile, or/and a friendly face. And when got caught, just explain what you are doing.
    It's been said here before; Know your gear, and look confident. And a small rangefinder is less intrusive and intimidating then a Nikon D3 with a tele. The reactions will be accordant most of the time.
    ....took the red pill, and just buckled up....

    Chris

    flickr&blog

  8. #38
    sionnac's Avatar
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    Wonderful about Yousuf Karsh

  9. #39
    CGW
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    Size matters. Small 35mm cameras with a 28mm to 50mm are unobtrusive(e.g., Nikon FE/FM series or FG bodies work best for me). Larger AF film and digital bodies with honking big zooms+hoods are asking for trouble and/or unwelcome attention. Chimping also draws notice once it's clear you're not playing with a phone. No one seems to notice when I shoot my Bronica SQ-B with a WLF or even a hulking RB67 on a tripod. I assume people think anything that takes that much time to set-up and shoot couldn't be harmful. It's the "hunter-drawing-a bead" stance that's considered provocative and intrusive.

    Behavior matters, too. Stalking, chasing or cornering people is dumb. Asking permission seems defeatist. Watch some footage of Cartier-Bresson at work. Simply blending in and patiently waiting for shots works, too. I've used a Manfrotto SuperClamp and a small ballhead attached to Toronto's curbside bike racks for great shots. With pre-focusing and some DOF, I used a cable release to catch people walking by or stopping to check-out a shop window just by tripping the shutter a few fet away from the camera.

    Overall, it's totally dependent on the street gestalt of the area, something you have to figure out by yourself.
    Last edited by CGW; 09-09-2010 at 01:28 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #40
    fotch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Try pointing in a different direction and use this: http://www.camerafilters.com/pages/r...glelenses.aspx


    Steve.
    I have one of these, purchased years ago from Spirotone. It works. However, its something you have to plan for in advance rather than shooting spontaneously.

    What I found works better and can be used with almost any camera, is learn to shoot from the hip, like a gunslinger. Practice will increase accuracy. No, not as accurate/reliable as aim and shoot, but no one knows they have been shot. They might suspect but if they are looking at your eyes, won't notice a slight flick of the finger. This also favors wider lens.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

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