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  1. #51
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    If the Bruce Gilden videos can teach us anything, it is that you can get away with a lot, don't use a long lens, be quick on the draw (deliberate) and have a fast wit paired with a faster mouth. I will say that I don't think I'd be comfortable doing what he does, but his technique yields great results.

    I think the single most important thing though is being quick with your shooting. You should be able to put the camera to your eye, take the picture and lower it within 2-3 seconds. Any longer and you're pushing your luck or you've probably already missed the shot. Oh, and you've gotta smile!
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  2. #52
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    If people ever confront me about my camera, I just say "it's some old thing that I found in my dad's closet, and I'm not even sure if it works or I'm using it right". Which is technically true so I don't feel bad about lying. It really takes any edge of seriousness off the mood.
    f/22 and be there.

  3. #53
    dehk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrismoret View Post
    And a hilarious tip I heard about.....Wear a reflective vest. People will think your a surveyor, and take no intrest in you. This guy did it all the time.
    It actually works, I have 2 reflective jacket for my old job. One of the thing i had to do is go take photos and check out the condition of the foreclosed houses, and that including the ones in the hood. If you don't want the drug dealer next door come out and shoot ya thinking you're taking photos of him, wear a big yellow jacket.
    - Derek
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  4. #54
    dehk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    maybe you should think about how YOU would feel if you were photographed
    on the street without your permission ?

    i know I don't like it ...
    Yeah I know i don't either.
    - Derek
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  5. #55
    dehk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Maybe a homeless person would object to you taking pictures because you refer to homeless people as "bums."
    Bum can also be homeless, but they don't have to be. lol

    Actually, for the ones that come after you for change, i thought about offer them change for a shot. But, I am so broke that I can't even afford to do that. Wait, maybe I am a bum, with a camera. Haha.
    - Derek
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  6. #56
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    i know I don't like it ...

    Yeah I know i don't either.

    I have nothing against that someone take a photo of me on street - if it makes him/her happy and/or he/she think it will be a good photo - good
    I am only one ?

  7. #57
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    @jnanian - I agree, but that just goes back to the issue of "intent". I don't ask permission to do street photography (not generally, anyway) but I also am not pulling a fast one, or intending to disrespect anyone. I think this intent colours my work, as it would anyone.

  8. #58
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Corneau View Post
    @jnanian - I agree, but that just goes back to the issue of "intent". I don't ask permission to do street photography (not generally, anyway) but I also am not pulling a fast one, or intending to disrespect anyone. I think this intent colours my work, as it would anyone.
    In kinder, gentler Canada, people might actually pause to listen to your "intent" statement. This seems to work even in Toronto but elsewhere?

  9. #59
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    I'm pretty far from Trawna, dude. And I photograph in a downtown area that has, to put it diplomatically, seen better days.

    The people are tough, quite a lot of them are weird and I don't claim to be able to predict anyone's reaction...you just know how to handle yourself, I guess, and that can't be taught, only gained through experience.

    I'm not out to do a freak show, disrespect anyone by crafting an image of them, or torque a point-of-view. I just photograph what's there.

    I'm not sure what you consider so airy-fairy about that -- as jnanian says, it's all about respect for others. I happen to think that's important. It's a statement of principles that applies to human beings everywhere.

  10. #60
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    maybe you should think about how YOU would feel if you were photographed
    on the street without your permission ?

    i know I don't like it ...
    Funny you should bring that up. I have been.

    Once I was setting up my 8x10 (a Calumet "Black Beast" - not a moniker lightly given) and I noticed a young lady of perhaps 17-18 years of age standing off at a respectful distance. She had a DSLR of some sort with a longish lens sporting one of those tulip hoods.

    When she put it to her eye and pointed it at me, I suddenly realized I was getting a taste of my own medicine. I did my absolute best not to laugh at the delicious irony and thereby ruin her efforts. I figured her to be a high school student working on an assigned project, so I just continued on as if she wasn't there.

    You know, John, honestly it didn't bother me one bit. More than anything else I took it to be a "My Name Is Earl" moment where karma was most definitely kicking my photographic ass. And given the number of times in the past I have been her, I figured the most appropriate thing to do was just to suck it up for the greater good and play the Crabman.

    After getting a few of me setting up, and later under the darkcloth (good for her to know enough to realize that this particular visually defining moment was coming, and then wait for it), she disappeared. I made no attempt to acknowledge her, nor she I. In spite of my curiosity, I felt that to also be part of my appropriate response.

    Hopefully we both walked away with some interesting photos. At least I thought mine were.

    Ken
    Last edited by Ken Nadvornick; 09-11-2010 at 12:51 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "When making a portrait, my approach is quite the same as when I am portraying a rock. I do not wish to impose my personality upon the sitter, but, keeping myself open to receive reactions from his own special ego, record this with nothing added: except of course when I am working professionally, when money enters in,—then for a price, I become a liar..."

    — Edward Weston, Daybooks, Vol. II, February 2, 1932



 

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