Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 74,484   Posts: 1,644,728   Online: 958
      
Page 7 of 18 FirstFirst 1234567891011121317 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 180
  1. #61

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Hong Kong/Paris
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    156
    So my question is, how do you stick a camera in someones face without them picking a fight with you?
    Know your equipment so well that you take less time to make the photo than it takes for them to get a complete sentence out of their mouth.
    After that, just walk away. Or stay put. If they harass you, call for help. If you weren't meant to be making photos there but decided to anyway, walk out of that area (that is, if you start getting questioned about it.)

    Don't think — just do. From my experience, once you think, you've lost.

    Have the police on speed dial or something, just in case someone does pick a fight with you.

    Also, try not to have too many things hanging off of you, just in case someone really tries to chase you home.

    Always be aware of your surroundings. An obvious one would be something like "don't stand in the corner and make photos if there's a chance your subject will harass you, because then you have no chance of escape."

    ‘I always feel like I’m a prisoner on the run’ — HCB

  2. #62
    dehk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    W Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    889
    I gathered everyone's advice and put it to use earlier today.

    Bought a Petri 7S range finder with 2TMY- Preset Focus and F stop for the DOF so i know what distance of my subject will come in focus. Also Pre metered using a light meter so i can adjust according to the lights. That worked out very good, I was able to take shots of people without them knowing most of them time, as if i am just waving my camera up to my eye, shoot it and bring it back down. Even got the homeless peoples sitting around, I don't think they noticed me taking photos of him but when some of them spotted the camera I know they didn't like me around. But then I remember everyone told me, just keep walking, which I did. And to my surprised, a couple stopped me when i was walking around, they asked me what i was doing, once again someone on the thread told me to think about why I want to do street photography etc, which, I thought about it before so without stuttering i told them I just like to document the people on the street blah blah blah. We exchanged conversation and they actually wanted me to photograph them, that was a bonus. Then me and my friend kept on walking, he ran out of film so I gave him my last roll i had in my bag. After i ran out in the rangefinder I had to bust out my Yashica 230AF. And you guys were right, people do notice me a lot more carrying an SLR around. I still shot people on the street but then I will try to act like i am photographing something else and let the 'victims' walk right into the frame themselves, or, once again, just keep on walking, haha.

    Developed both rolls just now, the ones from the rangefinder looks ok. Only thing i have to improve is, maybe i shouldn't do such a 'quick draw' too often, couple of them ended up blurry from camera shake. Overall I enjoyed walking around today. Half the time I was just joking with my friend how I can take photos without people noticing , and the speed. Turned out more like a game. But i guess it also helped first he was running around with a Kodak Duraflex, then a Minolta 7000. So he kinda got most of the attention, or distraction if you wanna think of it that way.

    Anyways, Thank You for all those contributed to this thread, your comments are much appreciated and will continue to work on all your advice.
    - Derek
    [ Insert meaningless camera listing here ]

  3. #63

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    37
    Shoot from behind.

    I followed this guy for quite a while waiting for his pants to fall down.


  4. #64
    M.A.Longmore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    New York
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,878
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by tokengirl View Post
    Shoot from behind.

    I followed this guy for quite a while waiting for his pants to fall down.

    .
    I'm always amazed by street scenes from the 1960's.
    Everyone always seemed to be dressed "properly", not to say that this
    gentleman is dressed improperly. It always seemed that everyone was
    dressed to go to church, or some special occasion. The last time I was in a
    church I happened to sit behind a woman whose thong was peeping out.
    Not that I'm offended by such sights. I don't like being criticized for my
    opinion, so I always have to remember to allow others to express themselves.

    I just woke up, maybe on the wrong side of the bed ...


    Ron
    .



  5. #65
    jnanian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    17,677
    Blog Entries
    6
    Images
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Corneau View Post
    @jnanian - I agree, but that just goes back to the issue of "intent". I don't ask permission to do street photography (not generally, anyway) but I also am not pulling a fast one, or intending to disrespect anyone. I think this intent colours my work, as it would anyone.
    yes ...

    it is all about intent ... and respect.
    too many people with cameras these days
    think it is a "real photography" to take cheap-shots.

    its one thing to show what the humanity of place is like, in living color,
    and another thing to throw a 10$ bill at a homeless person or street-drunk
    to put on a flickr page ...

  6. #66
    SuzanneR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,774
    Images
    140
    Here's someone's work of interest... NYC of the 60's and 70's. I studied with him back in the early 80's, when I was engaged in doing a lot of street pictures. Worth a look.

    http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/1...970s-new-york/

  7. #67
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Monroe, WA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,122
    Images
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by tokengirl View Post
    Shoot from behind.

    I followed this guy for quite a while waiting for his pants to fall down.

    Shoot the behind?

    This is just tooo good...

    Ken
    "When making a portrait, my approach is quite the same as when I am portraying a rock. I do not wish to impose my personality upon the sitter, but, keeping myself open to receive reactions from his own special ego, record this with nothing added: except of course when I am working professionally, when money enters in,—then for a price, I become a liar..."

    — Edward Weston, Daybooks, Vol. II, February 2, 1932

  8. #68
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,423
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by SuzanneR View Post
    Here's someone's work of interest... NYC of the 60's and 70's. I studied with him back in the early 80's, when I was engaged in doing a lot of street pictures. Worth a look.

    http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/1...970s-new-york/
    I saw those yesterday... they're great!

    What would he have to add to this thread?

  9. #69

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tokyo
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    20
    A waste level finder on a medium format camera works wonders. Nobody ever thinks that you're taking a picture from "down there". Just focus with the camera to the eye, then let it hang down your neck, look into the viewfinder, arrange scene/composition/subject.. and shoot. That's what I do

    Norman

  10. #70
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,780
    Quote Originally Posted by hirokun View Post
    A waste level finder on a medium format camera works wonders. Nobody ever thinks that you're taking a picture from "down there". Just focus with the camera to the eye, then let it hang down your neck, look into the viewfinder, arrange scene/composition/subject.. and shoot. That's what I do

    Norman
    I agree but TLRs are the best IMO, , medium format SLR s make too much noise .
    Ben



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin