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  1. #11
    jscott's Avatar
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    We need to be careful… I was photographing a leading Irish musician performing solo, using my Rolleiflex 2.8C. I was in the front row in a small room. I thought that it had a quiet shutter, but after I took a shot the musician looked at me quite annoyed and whispered "please, not during an air" (meaning a slow, quiet tune). It might have been OK during a reel or a polka...

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I used to shoot weddings with a Mamiya C330. In the church, the minister/priest would always ask me to be as quiet as possible (when any photos were permitted) and would usually request that the guests do not take photos at all during the ceremony.

    How things have changed.

    Actually, I have a very clear memory of a "noise" problem. I was photographing a panel discussion in the old Arts Club theatre in Vancouver. The panel was made up of some of the best known and important Quebec playwrights in Canadian theatre history. The audience was full of dedicated scholars and theatergoers who were hanging on every word.

    The old Arts Club had a wood floor centre aisle that was raked - it rose steadily from the stage area to the back row of the theatre.

    It was absolutely amazing - a plastic Olympus lens cap made the most outrageous racket falling to the aisle at the back of the theatre and rolling on its edge all the way to the front!
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13
    Pioneer's Avatar
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    To be completely honest, though many leaf shutters are quite quiet, I never felt that the Rollei shutters were as quiet as some of my older folders were.

    But I think if I had to have a quiet shutter now days I would pick the Fuji GF670. Half the time I can't even tell the camera took the picture...and I am the one who pressed the shutter button.
    Dan

    The simplest tools can be the hardest to master.

  4. #14

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    Thanks for the insight. I think if it comes to the ceremony or a place where it's absolute silence or very very low level of noise, the 645 may come off as pretty (relatively) loud. I think when things are going on, it's not a big deal. But when the focal point is on one thing and the expectation is silence... ah, I don't know. I guess I'm just mindful of the noise so expect it of others also. I remember someone firing off with a pro Canon or Nikon digital and the mirror slap echoed throughout the hall. It was pretty loud and noticeable as she took a few frames at once.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pioneer View Post
    To be completely honest, though many leaf shutters are quite quiet, I never felt that the Rollei shutters were as quiet as some of my older folders were.

    But I think if I had to have a quiet shutter now days I would pick the Fuji GF670. Half the time I can't even tell the camera took the picture...and I am the one who pressed the shutter button.
    The film advance / shutter cocking noise is most of the time much louder than the shutter itself not mentioning the mirror slap!
    "The problem with photography is that it only deals with appearances." Duane Michals

    "Only weak pictures need perfection." David Vestal

  6. #16
    analoguey's Avatar
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    Everyone has a smartphone. And everyone wants a picture with their smartphone - at least thats what I have observed at weddings here - and that means there are usually at least 8 cameras focused on the couple, ppl jostling to take pic, then commenting that their camera is awesome..

  7. #17
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by analoguey View Post
    Everyone has a smartphone. And everyone wants a picture with their smartphone - at least thats what I have observed at weddings here - and that means there are usually at least 8 cameras focused on the couple, ppl jostling to take pic, then commenting that their camera is awesome..
    Gaak! Years ago my best ever friend and I shot weddings, first with 35mm then a 645 Mamiya. At that time there weren't cell phones, and anyone using a SLR was probably pretty proficient and wouldn't mess up our shots. I don't care to shoot weddings professionally today, although I have all the equipment to do it. You have to satisfy the bride, and her mother, and just maybe the groom. Difficult if not impossible to reshoot. Too much stress for an Old Fart like me.

    When I have shot candids for friends' weddings, I introduce myself to the pro, if there is one, and try to work with him/her, certainly not against him/her, like some of those with PS and cell phones seem to be doing. "Professional courtesy," as it were.

  8. #18

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    OK, so I had the opportunity to bring the Pentax 645 to my friend's wedding (as a guest). The cameras these days tend to be really quiet and even the cellphone shutters are relatively quiet.
    I shot my own photographs and, as I do weddings myself, made efforts to NOT bump into and take over any of the main photographer's shots.

    That being said, the Pentax 645 is relatively LOUD. It could be that those closest to me could hear it go off really loudly, but I suspect the same would hold true if I was up front and the bride and groom were praying and I fired a frame. I fear that the ringing throughout the church hall would stop the entire church service... Just kidding

    In all honesty, the Pentax 645 is a loud camera in terms of the MOTOR WIND, which is not something heard these days but the shutter is pretty dampened. I think in the most silent of moments, I'd have to find a way to muffle it. Once the music gets going people start chatting, it begins to blend in with the noise. Now time to figure out how to dampen it.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by dugrant153 View Post
    Now time to figure out how to dampen it.
    I have a P645N if I were in your position and wanted a picture during the ceremony where the guests are silent all I can think of is say a 200mm lens and being far enough away from the couple for the noise to only disturb me.

    If you do figure out how to dampen it then be sure to let us( or is that "we") P645 or P645N users know what you did

    Thanks

    pentaxuser

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