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  1. #1
    DF
    DF is offline

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    Photographing Construction Sites

    How do you get close to a construction site/project-in-the-making without arousing suspicion or annoyance from the workers? I mean, I want more than just the street-view where anyone can shoot. I like construction site photos for when the project is finished, It's a way of looking back at the hard work and planning that goes into them. should I speak to the foreman? I don't make money from this and don't post online.

  2. #2
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    It depends where you are located. Here in Australia, there is always a notice with the name and telephone number of a contact person. That would be the best place to start.

  3. #3
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    I went for a walk in the evening around Singapore with my EOS3. Stumbled past a construction-site for one of their their new subway lines, the lines and lights and shadows meant I had to take some shots of it, through a crack in the gate.
    Of course then a security guard stopped me and asked me to delete it, so I had to explain that it was a film camera. To stop him thinking about just taking the whole roll, I may a good show of saying that I could double-expose that frame pointing at a light to burn the whole thing blank, pointing to the double-exposure button and all that and letting him hear the shutter for the long exposure.
    Meanwhile, that double-exposed the 'next' frame, not the one I'd taken of the construciton site (but in the end, the handheld 1/2 second original exposure at night was too blurry anyway).

    Of course, in Australia it's not illegal to take photos of anything but 'prescribed military sites' and things like that so I would have argued my case, but in Singapore arguing with law-enforcement is something I'd rather not try.


    There's been some great constructions going on around here, street-level is easy to get, but I'd also love to get inside the half-finished buildings. Unfortunately, I know the OH&S requirements to get on-site even working for a potential supplier, I'm not even going to bother asking to bring an SLR, let alone a view-camera and tripod.
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

    f/64 and be there.

  4. #4

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    Get in touch with the architect/engineer and offer your services.

  5. #5
    Keith Pitman's Avatar
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    I have a friend that photographs industrial construction sites for a living. Many of his are aerials. All you need is an aircraft.
    Keith Pitman
    Photographer
    www.keithpitman.com

  6. #6

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    Talk to the foreman. He can either coordinate your visit or tell you who can. His biggest concern will be your safety and non-interference with his workers. If the construction company lawyers get involved then expect a "no" answer.

  7. #7

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    It also helps to bring legitimate credentials -- a sponsor or a good reason. The likelihood of getting onto a major job site just for amateur or art photography may be difficult.

  8. #8
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
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    Yeah, you should obtain permission.

    Maybe doing an artistic project is reason enough, maybe not.

    I think the chances.are pretty small as they wouldn't leave you unattended on site and probably can't spare someone to watch you for too long.

    If you sneak in without permission, you'll be breaking the law in most countries (trespass) and may have to pay a fine.

    there is a lot of theft from building sites so the police will usually deal with trespassers there.

  9. #9

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    I would emphasize "historical documentation" as a reason and hope the construction firm would resonate with that. Most construction projects are photographed by the company/client or their insurers for such purposes since they often need it for contractual compliance and liability purposes.



 

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