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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    There were no restrictions on what I could shoot. I had the highest clearance in the Data and Photo Division there except for the Colonel at the head. I could grant and lift clearances and shoot anywhere or anyone.
    Really cool stuff to have unhindered access would have been awesome. To live there at that time must have been something, the closest I have come tp any of that is watching Apollo 13 and The Right Stuff 5 or 6 times each, not quite the same thing! : )

    If you can post some of the those images would love to see them, are they online?

    Gerry

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post

    In the attached photo, I am in front of the Mercury capsule testing room. Two capsules are there, one for Glenn and one for Grisson (foreground). I am with Red Williams the designer of the astronaut cameras for Mercury and Gemini. The camera in-hand is one that went into orbit.

    PE
    what type of cameras were on Mercury and Gemini? adapted Hasselblads? did they change film in space? that must have been fun..or did they just have special long rolls of film?

  3. #23
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    Gerry;

    See the photos in my gallery. Some of them were published in the newspaper. I left just as Gemini was starting.

    The first 6 astronauts used custom made cameras by Red Williams. They used 35mm or 120 film. The still cameras were derived from off-the-shelf models with extreme modificaiton for weight. Hasselblad was one model used. Some of the film in the capsule was ECN (motion picture film) so that high quality could be obtained with long latitude. These credits are made in the National Geographic article on the early shots and NG published a limited edition pamphlet on the photography which was about 50 pages long. I believe that this limited edition pamphlet is very hard to get. I think I only have one left.

    Many photos were taken on HS Ektachrome and then cross processed at ISO 400 for the high speed it gave (160 normally). In C-22, HS Ektachrome was more like 400. One of these photos was on the front page of Life magazine, taken by an NG photographer, IIRC.

    Every month, I had to box up all original footage to sent to Wright Patterson AFB for the government archives. In a brilliant move, all of this was destroyed recently, and the University of Central Florida have been trying to reconstruct photos from private (retired) individuals such as myself. I have supplied the project director there with about 100 of my personal photos and I have also contributed to the historical book "Go For Launch". Art LeBrun, co-author got many of my anecdotes and photos to supply to the author.

    But, the fact remains that early documentation of the space program was destroyed by the government.

    PE

  4. #24

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    detroyed? why the hell did they do that? accident? hmm by the gov't! were they hiding something? or just ignorant of the historic value of the work?

    Thanks for the info, all of it it is very interesting. Modifiying cameras for weight must have been quite an expensive job, whatever happened to all those cameras? in some museum somewhere?

  5. #25
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    The government did not realize the historical value of the work, did not have the money to keep the archives well, and ran out of storage space. So, off it went. What was there to hide? Most of it was on TV! I stood behind the ABC lead at the time, Herb Kaplow, as he narrated the live feed for the Glenn launch. "Live" is a misnomer. He was watching a tape delayed by about 30" while watching the scene live, so he appeared to be precognitive with statements like "in about 30" a guard should come out that door" and of course he had already seen that, but it would not air for 30".

    The cameras were reduced in weight by having aluminum or magnesium replace parts of the body and mechanism. And these had holes drilled in them to further reduce weight. Red had trouble with the light weight metals deteriorating during testing, so he had to make more than one camera so that one could be worn out during prelaunch tests and the other was "for real". Also, one of the big problems was designing a film advance that fit the thumb on the suit.

    The cameras went to the Smithsonian except for a 'blad that was "Lost in Space". There is a story behind Glenn's camera, but that is for another place and another time.

    PE

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    The government did not realize the historical value of the work, did not have the money to keep the archives well, and ran out of storage space. So, off it went. What was there to hide? Most of it was on TV! I stood behind the ABC lead at the time, Herb Kaplow, as he narrated the live feed for the Glenn launch. "Live" is a misnomer. He was watching a tape delayed by about 30" while watching the scene live, so he appeared to be precognitive with statements like "in about 30" a guard should come out that door" and of course he had already seen that, but it would not air for 30".

    The cameras were reduced in weight by having aluminum or magnesium replace parts of the body and mechanism. And these had holes drilled in them to further reduce weight. Red had trouble with the light weight metals deteriorating during testing, so he had to make more than one camera so that one could be worn out during prelaunch tests and the other was "for real". Also, one of the big problems was designing a film advance that fit the thumb on the suit.

    The cameras went to the Smithsonian except for a 'blad that was "Lost in Space". There is a story behind Glenn's camera, but that is for another place and another time.

    PE
    haha...that must have helped with the broadcasting knowing what was going to happen 30 seconds before it did! might make the decisive moment easier to capture in photography also!

    Blad was lost in space? hmm wonder if they will ever find it, wonder where it is now! did they at least get the film out first?

  7. #27
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    AFAIK, it is still in orbit with film. It may have re-entered the atmosphere by now. That was years ago.

    PE

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuzanneR View Post
    A...My only problem with Salgado, is that his books are so damn expensive, and poorly edited. I think he waters down his message with too many pictures. I'd rather see leaner books from him. It would pack an even greater punch for me. He is that kind of photographer who is making extraordinarily beautiful pictures of some of the world's most difficult problems.

    I like it when art and documentary photography intersect.
    As once he said in one documentary/interview about him: If you understand that his average shooting speed is about 1/125, book that have 100 his photographs contain only about a second of history. Not much when look that way
    Bosnia... You don't have to be crazy to live here, but it helps...
    No things in life should be left unfinis

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by gerryyaum View Post
    Thanks Murray, I like Jose's work very much he was one of the first photographers I saw on APUG and was one of the main reasons I joined the group.

    Gerry
    www.gerryyaum.com
    www.gerryyaum.blogspot.com
    Thanks Gerry and Murray. Gerry there is no doubt that I do a lot of documentary, so count me in the list. In this moment I have no time to a more detail answer. Of the three photogs listed, Smith, Mark and Salgado, my favourite is Mary Ellen, she is my teacher and mentor... more later.
    Jose A. Martinez

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by haris View Post
    As once he said in one documentary/interview about him: If you understand that his average shooting speed is about 1/125, book that have 100 his photographs contain only about a second of history. Not much when look that way
    Looking at the book Africa I wondered how many times he visited africa, how many hours on the ground, how many nights slept in strange places, how many meals eaten with strangers etc.

    Interesting to learn he shoots mostly at 1/125 have to file that in the memory banks.

    Thanks

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