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  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    In days of old a wedding might be shot on a few glass plates, I have the contact prints from my Grandparents 1910 wedding, there's just 3 shots, 2 of the bride with & without brides-maids and one very large, highly organised group shot, whether others were shot I don't know but that was all my Grandmother had. She wasn't a photographer but she liked photographs and on her honeymoon bought two landscape images to hang in their farm-house.

    The wedding must have been shot with a 10x12 camera.

    Ian

  2. #12
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Ian brings up a good point; I think what's considered the norm is an evolving expectation. My parents were married in 1937 and I don't think there's more than a handful of pictures of the event, primarily a formal, posed shot of the bride and groom. In the past year or so, I've gotten two weddings on two rolls each of 6x6, but I was just a bystander playing the role of eccentric uncle (and I wouldn't argue they were "complete"). I often wonder how many of the fancy video productions that have been common over the last decade or so will still be viewable for a 25th or 50th anniversary celebration (assuming anyone can find something to view them on).

  3. #13
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    My parents were married in 1936, the only pictures that we have were four beautifully lit 12x10 monochrome posed studio shots on WFL paper, in slip mounts by the best photographic studio in the area, there were none of the actual wedding, or the guest, or the reception, I never thought about it before, but maybe it was the norm in those days not to shoot the actual wedding.
    Ben

  4. #14
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    I think you mean my comment not Dave's. The images weren't shot in a studio, they are outdoor location shots.

    My guess is the images where shot by Valentine's of Dundee, a very important company in early photographic history, my Grandfather was definitely photographed by them a few times previous to his wedding. The compay still exists but in a different guise.

    Ian

  5. #15
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Yes I did Ian, sorry.
    Ben

  6. #16

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    there is no surprise that all your shots came out because you did it in manual.

  7. #17
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    One could always try half-frame if they weren't concerned about making big enlargements.
    Those who know, shoot film

  8. #18
    eddym's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    there is no surprise that all your shots came out because you did it in manual.
    "Came out"? Was it a gay wedding?
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  9. #19

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    I'm always amazed by the number of shots photographers provide at weddings these days. When I was regularly shooting weddings here in the UK, back in the 70's and 80's, the norm for a wedding was 4 rolls of medium format. Medium format was de rigeur and anyone shooting 35mm was frowned upon. We would take 48 shots and guarantee 45 proofs. How times change; every picture taken really had to count back then.

  10. #20
    Cliffy13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mexico531 View Post
    I'm always amazed by the number of shots photographers provide at weddings these days. When I was regularly shooting weddings here in the UK, back in the 70's and 80's, the norm for a wedding was 4 rolls of medium format. Medium format was de rigeur and anyone shooting 35mm was frowned upon. We would take 48 shots and guarantee 45 proofs. How times change; every picture taken really had to count back then.
    Well said Mexico whilst I appreciate with a reportage style more shots will be taken on digital you still need to concentrate on getting it right first time,the other advantage today is that you can check the result immediately I remember many nervous days waiting for the film to come back to ensure I had got it right
    There Is A Bustle In My Hedgerow

    My Film Shots On Flickr

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