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  1. #11

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    Personally I think it'll look cool. I love that church. Great place for photos.

    Jeff

  2. #12
    sun of sand's Avatar
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    i'd do a semicircle to block the stones bride groom on bench
    or have the keepers remove them for the day
    i'd also take some with the headstones
    bride groom standing on walk underneath tree blocking upright stone on right
    the entire lineup in front of the bench left to right hiding all but upper trunk and foliage crown
    maybe parents sitting on bench with them standing
    maybe long line of guests on walk to block all stones to the right bridegroom on bench
    maybe there is a composition somewhere if you have them stand on the bench
    i dont know if thats etiquette
    i don't if that's the correct way to say "not etiquette" ..how do you say that, im blank
    maybe do some "daily routine" photos on the bench or on the grounds there
    have him take his spot on a burial plot since his life is over ...I wouldn't do that, not even on the backside of the plot ..ever
    candid shots of kids are always great no matter what background
    but it's a cemetery


    if you don't have enough guests or desserts just knock on the tree and ask for the elves

  3. #13
    Rick A's Avatar
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    My first thought is to remove the bench, and use the cement pedistal for standing group shot. Camera low and in front as to use the group to block the headstones and giving a slight upward angle to aid that. This will also bring the tree into the shot.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  4. #14
    ted_smith's Avatar
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    Thanks for the ideas guys.

    Just to the left of the shot is the main church entrance, which has a very "oldy worldy", tudor-like wooden framed entrance. I think I will try to get the main formal shots of folk stood in front of that and the main church itself, and then use the bench for the smaller group shots, perhaps - especially the one's with kiddies.

    The issue regarding the headstones - I'd considered this but felt that the group size combined with shallow DOF (they are quite a way back from the tree) would probably help mask them. I think when photographing in a church yard these are always going to be a feature, to some extent, aren't they? We have to just do our best to ensure they're not prominent. Just my view.
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  5. #15
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Ask them what they want. Get specific. Be repetitive. Ask/inform them about the gravestones, specifically, for sure. Simple enough: talk to your client. Communication is key. It's the second most important part of shooting weddings, or most things for that matter. The first most important is a signed contract that makes you undefeatable in court when (if?) you are sued.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  6. #16
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wclark5179 View Post
    Bye Steve.

    Your comments are not appreciated.

    Good luck everyone.

    I see. Like the following in which I was the first to bring up was not followed up by anyone else:

    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I understand what you want, but do you really want tomb stones in the background of a wedding photograph? Different parts of the life cycle and all that.
    Steve
    The practice of the APUG website is to refrain from getting into digital processes which are by the way the perview of the sister site http://www.hybridphoto.com.

    When did you become a self appointed monitor? I did not get the memo.

    Steve
    Last edited by Sirius Glass; 05-16-2010 at 05:40 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  7. #17
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    A wedding shoot in a graveyard!?
    The idea strikes me as very oblique and incoherent in a way. Most people are dying to get in there, not sure about brides-to-be...
    If the tree must be featured, the couple should be place behind the bench or the bride seated on it and the groom behind, with the entire arrangement tightly cropped to exclude the irrelevant background of gravestones. I see no aesthetic benefit including the stones. A moderate telephoto lens would assist in compressing the scene and framing.

    Here in Australia, King Billy Pine (Athrotaxis selaginoides) frequently reach 1500+ years in age in remote alpine rainforest areas of Tasmania, and this is considered young. Not sure if they have certificates!
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  8. #18
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Here in Australia, King Billy Pine (Athrotaxis selaginoides) frequently reach 1500+ years in age in remote alpine rainforest areas of Tasmania, and this is considered young. Not sure if they have certificates!
    Thanks Garyh.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #19
    ted_smith's Avatar
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    A wedding shoot in a graveyard!?
    The idea strikes me as very oblique and incoherent in a way.
    I'm not a full time wedding photographer, thus the original question, but don't a good proportion of wedding shoots take place in a church or the grounds of a church? Correct me if I'm wrong but I know some couples prefer to have them taken at the reception venue if it's nicer than the church or church grounds, but that's not the case here and is by no means 'the absolute thing to do' (or is it?). Of course I'll ensure the headstones do not play a prominent role in the photos and I'll avoid it entirely where I can as described above (I have a Nikon 80-200mm that I hope to use for this if possible).
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  10. #20
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Yes they do, Ted, depending on historical (very, very old), aesthetic (spatial representation, complimentary/contextual strength and mood), and the representative image on Facebook for all intents and purposes is thin on all three, with the exception of the yew tree as having potential with the bench. The gravestones look quite bland and unserviceable, certainly not of the visually interesting very ancient ones that can be found in churchyards around the UK. Go down to the yew and experiment with your 80-200 with various frame-ups. Maybe climb up the yew for a "up here/looking down" shot at the happy couple!
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






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