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  1. #11
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ted_smith View Post
    Hi all

    ....
    Also, the priest refused the use of flash in the church.

    Ted
    Of course he did. It is just common courtesy. I am surprised that you even asked. It used to be that NO PHOTOGRAPHY was allowed during the ceremony - period.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    Of course he did. It is just common courtesy. I am surprised that you even asked. It used to be that NO PHOTOGRAPHY was allowed during the ceremony - period.
    In most of the weddings I've shot I've been permitted to use flash before the ceremony, during the signing of the register, and as the bride and groom walk down the aisle after the ceremony.

    It's not totally clear to me, but Ted may be saying that flash was not permitted at all in the church.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    In most of the weddings I've shot I've been permitted to use flash before the ceremony, during the signing of the register, and as the bride and groom walk down the aisle after the ceremony.

    It's not totally clear to me, but Ted may be saying that flash was not permitted at all in the church.
    Hello everybody,
    first of all i must admit that pictures are nice. They look very "British" and the rainy day has contributed to this. You have done very well considering the bad weather and i know that the original prints are far better than scannings.
    I have been shooting a number of weddings (about 10) plus 25th recurrences.
    And the issue with the use of flash (and photography) in the Church must always be considered. Here in Italy (and i guess it applies for all Catholich Churches worldwide) there's a list of rules for photography inside the Church. There some moments that cannot be photographed at all, flash or not.
    For the rest of the marriage my advice is to go and talk to the Priest (if possible some days before the event) telling him how we will act during the ceremony and assuring that we will be the noiseless photographers in the world. For me it has always helped. Keep up the good photography.
    Ciao

  4. #14

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    Both of the weddings I've shot forbade photography during the entire ceremony and they were both civil registry office affairs, not churches.
    Steve.

  5. #15
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    "Also, the priest refused the use of flash in the church."

    I always ask if I can use a flash for the processional including the bride being given away by Dad. 99 times out of 100 I receive permission. How do I do that?

    Attending the rehearsal, I make it a point to have a discussion with the presider, suggesting how s(he) can be involved during this emotional scene at the beginning of the ceremony. I make beautiful pictures showing the emotions on the faces of Dad giving his daughter away, the presider helping and the groom anxious to get going with the ceremony. These pictures will be treasured by the bride & groom. An example is the 11th picture on my web site.

    When I run into an obstacle to do this by the presider, before I give up, I tell them you won't even notice me as I've been doing this for a while and don't you want them to remember this beautiful time at the beginning of the ceremony in the Church with you welcoming them after dad gives his daughter away?

    At any rate, these photos are very much treasured by my clients. After all the day is very special because of the bride & groom.
    Bill Clark

  6. #16
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    Re the flash issue - people are pulling me up on not providing a full explanation here. I visited the Church 3 times prior to the wedding. Once on my own to walk round the grounds, to see what the light was like at the time of the ceremony on a sunny day. Then again with the bride and groom when I met the priest for the first time was able to go inside - again, it was at the time of day that the ceremony was to be held. My words to him were "...and I assume flash is a no-no?...smiled" for which he knodded and said yes. So it's not that I said "Please will you let me use flash because I'm ruined without it?" - I assumed not by default, as courtesy, as has been said, but wondered if he might be one of a very few who don't mind flash being used.

    I then went again for the reheasel two days before the ceremony where he detailed which stages he'd allow ME to take photographs - he banned the entire audience taking any for reasons I quite respect. He did allow flash in the back room for the mock signing of the register. He also allowed it in the doorway prior to bride entering the full church.

    So there was lots of pre-planning for this, and lots of discussion with the priest. Maybe I should have made this clearer but thought the one line of "flash was not allowed" covered the point.
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  7. #17
    BradS's Avatar
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    That's a very respectful approach. Good job Ted. I apologize for jumping to conclusions. I am also glad that you did not tempt his ego inorder to try to convince him. Keep up the good work and bravo for having common courtesy!

  8. #18

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    comments:
    framing is too tight but I think you already explained that.
    35mm frame which is 3:2 ratio is IMO not suited to portrait orientation. 4:3 is much better so bear that in mind with your framing when in portrait mode. The typical 8x10 frames which people use for photos on a shelf, matlepiece etc need approx one inch mount border so you end up with 8x6 image which is 4:3 that is one reason why you need to be thinking about it when taking images. You don't really need to rotate camera at all. Just take everything in landscape. ( or get a 6x4.5 camera )
    Try and take images where the participants are reacting to one another rather than looking down the barrel of a lens unless you are deliberately making a head shot.
    just my opnions for what its worth.

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