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  1. #11

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    I have checked a number of U.K. stockists including the Fuji film site itself and there was no sign of Pro 800 but neither was there a notice saying "discontinued". It is still available at one stockist with a stock plenty listing but that stockist may simply have put in a massive order prior to its discontinuation( if this is the case).

    It would appear however that Superia 800 is still a product line and 1600. The latter is very fast but gets a bit grainy above 10x8 in my experience.

    So a bit of a mystery. There seems to be some evidence that Pro800 may have been discontinued but it is not conclusive.

    pentaxuser

  2. #12

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    Just a bit of an update. On one of the most reliable of U.K. sites, Agphotographic( run by Matt a subscriber here) there is a notice to the effect that Fuji almost discontinued Fuji Pro 800 in 35mm in 2009 but changed its mind due to customer reaction. However there is no 120 but there is Kodak Portra 800 in both 35mm and 120.

    So crisis over

    pentaxuser

  3. #13

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    Since I'm shooting Kodak Portra, that's good news that they're still producing 400 and 800 ISO. Unfortunately, it's all special order here where I love, or atleast I have to find a store that sells it.

  4. #14
    eddym's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dugrant153 View Post
    Since I'm shooting Kodak Portra, that's good news that they're still producing 400 and 800 ISO. Unfortunately, it's all special order here where I love, or atleast I have to find a store that sells it.
    Do you love where you live, or live where you love?
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by dugrant153 View Post
    The only thing with shooting at ISO 640 is that you lose some contrast? I really like shots that have that really 'deep' look to them. (full of color or tone) and I find that when I underexpose it becomes very air and light... almost kind of faded... especially in the shadows!
    Pushing film should actually INCREASE contrast. What you observe might be cause by some different placement of luminance levels across the toe region, maybe.. That is, if you push a negative, shadows tend to be more "packed" and have less local contrast. If you or your printer try to raise them to brighter levels, you might end up with muddy shadows, which might be your case.

    Just my 2 pennies from the small experience I have. :-)

    Ciao
    Marco

  6. #16

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    Thanks for that tip, Marco! Something I have to keep in mind if I ever push/pull film.

    Oops! I should've said "where I live". haha. Give me access to Portra 800 and I'll be happy as a clam.

  7. #17
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I would think that you can find Portra 800 at Beau Photo. Lens and Shutter may have it too. Leos Cameras are a possibility as well. Finally, it would be worth asking at ABC Photocolour too.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #18

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    Oh yeah yeah. I just checked Beau Photo and they have stock.

    Lens and Shutter (the new one Downtown) did not have it nor seem to have access? Leo's I haven't checked.
    I'll have to check ABC as well

  9. #19

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    kk... well, I'm starting to get a workflow down.

    Here's my question. When there's a lot of changing light throughout the day, how do you setup your cameras and film?

    Do you folks stick to a certain film all day and just underexpose or overexpose?

    I've been in a lot of churches where 800 ISO would've been best but had a 400 ISO film in the camera and... well, couldn't easily change unless I had another camera.

    Curious if you folks load up one camera with one film, and a second camera with another or.... something like that? I'm planning on using two 35mm cameras + 1 medium format (645) camera.

  10. #20
    marco.taje's Avatar
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    Do you folks stick to a certain film all day and just underexpose or overexpose?
    Well, no, I don't think it's supposed to work that way. Under- or overexposure is a function of the development you choose for that roll. That means that you decide to develop that roll to suit a certain brightness range and hence adjust your exposure accordingly. So you can't change these settings within the same roll, from this point of view.

    So, one roll ---> one development method ---> one EI.

    That said, you may as well use only ONE type of film, and adapt its development and EI as lighting changes. This is also when interchangeable backs really have an edge! I will typically use one film, and if I find I have to cope with different "brightness range" setups at the same time, I will load another back with the same film, but deciding to give different development and EI to the second roll.

    If you have the chance to switch backs or cameras, I think that's the way it goes. If you're stuck with one roll at a time, try to find an average development and exposure that will be ok, although not exactly spot on, for what you expect to shoot.

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