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  1. #31
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Make sure to talk it out with your wife, you will not be able to pay her any attention until the wedding is over. It's not that you don't care, it's that you are occupied.

    Do you have the flexibility at this point to add a guest to the roster? Maybe you can have your wife bring a best friend so she won't miss you.

  2. #32

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    Do you have an ability to add a second shooter? It seems you are already committed to the event. Maybe having a second shooter would be a good idea should something go really wrong. You won't be losing your friend and your couple will have some pictures from their day.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #33
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaximusM3
    Quote Originally Posted by mabman View Post
    I was asked to take some pics at a family wedding 3 years ago, although they hired a "pro" (quotes deliberate) for the main shots. It was a learning experience I strongly recommend using flash at the reception - I tried to do 3200-6400 or higher ISO shots (on Delta 3200 and Tri-X) with no flash to not ruin the mood, but that largely didn't work out (lighting was turned down extremely low - I tried metering it, it came out to 3-4 EV generally). Also, it was an open bar and the guests were very well lubricated and couldn't have cared less about flash at that point
    Yes, flash will likely be a must here. Weather is going to be awful probably and most, or the entirety of the event, will be inside. Considering that it is a restaurant, I doubt that lighting will be anything great. I will bring a Leica fitted with a Noctilux and a few rolls of Delta or P3200, just in case.
    But will the minister allow flash during the ceremony? These among other things need to be looked to ahead of time. If you get a flash, make sure you have a wide angle screen for anything shorter than 50mm or you will get a dark band on the bottom of the photographs. Make sure you get it all right.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  4. #34

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    If you really want to have fun take all the photos you can BEFORE and right after the ceremony, maybe a few of them exchanging vows. Ask them to get table cameras for the reception, honestly I believe that the photographer should leave when the reception starts anyway (if they are not a guest). At my wedding my friends got great photos of us dancing and the jackass photographer was in every one framing up his lousy shot.

    I would use the F6 (the Leica would have won if you had a flash for it) for the before shots, and I would shoot ONE and only ONE roll of medium format outdoors of the bridal party then dump that camera in the trunk of the car. Either finish off the roll of 35mm or only shoot only one roll (24 or 36 your choice) of 35mm at the reception, then lock that in the car as well. Finish off your night with disposables, then they can blend those into an album with everyone's shots. As for film, your on your own, check out the location and decide what film you think will work best there.

    Try to remember to get to the Bride as soon as her hair is done, and stay with her until the reception.
    "Would you like it if someone that painted in oils told you that you were not making portraits because you were using a camera?"
    "Shouldn't it be more about the joy of producing and viewing the photo than what you paid for the camera?"

    Me

  5. #35
    darinwc's Avatar
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    I just co-photographed a wedding (my first) and here are some tidbits that may help.
    -make a check-list of the shots they want.
    -get there early to scout the area. Some shots of setting up the event can be fun.
    -You need to work fast. i'd say to use the f6 as your main with a normal zoom and fill flash.
    -having a 2nd camera works great. the contax or fuji would be good, or a digital. I carried a bag over my shoulder with a 2nd camera with a different focal length. I could grab the other camera faster than changing a lens. You can also load the 2nd cam with different film.
    -Get close. a short tele sounds ideal but indoors you wont have much room. Dont be afraid to use a wide angle, but again, get close else your subject will be small in the photo.
    -use fill in artificial light. The wrong color balance will murder your shots.
    -Use a tripod for the staged shots.
    -Get creative. Have fun!
    Go not to the elves for counsel, for they will say both yes and no.

  6. #36

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    OK, you seem determined to do this. Let me give you one more bit of advice and a horror story.

    If you speak to pro wedding photographers you will find that most have one steadfast rule -- only the photographer and his assistants can take photos in the church (or wherever the ceremony is held). Anyone can take photos at the reception but the church is off limits. Many include this restriction in their contract and urge that quests be so advised. Some pros go as far as to have an assistant check the guests when they enter. I like to think of this rule as the "Uncle Maury and his Instamatic" rule. There is usually one Uncle Maury at most weddings. If you are particularly unfortunate there may be more than one. Uncle Maury will try to steal your shots; he will cut in front of you or shoot over your shoulder or just get in the way. Not only is this annoying, it is distracting. Many pros will find that if they cannot neutralize Uncle Maury they are apt to find themselves accused of charging too much. This usually goes something like tis, "You charge too much. Look at these photos that Uncle Maury took, they're just like yours and it didn't cost us a penny". Be warned, be very warned.

    My horror story is this. I promised to take photos for friends. When I showed up on the day of the ceremony I was appalled to find both the bride and the groom stoned out of their minds. Whenever I would point a camera at the bride she would start crying. This was not a ladylike sniff and the dabbing of a handkerchief to the eye, this was shoulder shuddering sobs with copious tears. Nothing I could do would calm this behavior. The groom had a different problem. He appeared to have lost control of one eyelid. This made him look like he was constantly winking at the camera. Needless to say the couple was unhappy and I was threatened with a law suite and had to eat all my expenses.

    Anyway good luck and I hope things go well for you. Post with what happened with your shoot.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #37

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    I've done a few weddings, always for friends or friends of friends. So here's my advice: Shoot the F6, put it in program mode and use the flash. You want as few mistakes possible and you won't have as much time as you think to change lenses or make adjustments. I would use a 50mm AFD or a Tamron 28-75 2.8. The F6 is a fantastic camera and you can just let it do it's thing and you do yours. It's autoload so you won't have to fumble about with the next roll. Have the Leica in your bag as a back-up just in case.
    Steve Long

    my blog: http://wayofuncertainty.com/

  8. #38
    MaximusM3's Avatar
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    Thank you, ALL! You guys are the best!
    Like I've said, this gig is beyond low key. My friend is trying to get away with spending the least amount of money on this one so..sometimes you get what you pay for
    I'm going in with plenty of confidence and I think decent skills..I CAN DO IT

    Looks like the F6 fitted with an SB800 (hoping to obviously bounce a lot, and praying for no low, dark ceilings), my 85mm Nikkor f1.4 and a new Zeiss Distagon ZF 35mm. Maybe a 135mm DC for portraits if it makes sense outdoors. The Leica will be for black & white with a Noctilux f1 and a Summilux 35 to be fast and nimble.
    I know I should not mention the D word but, just for reference, last year I shot a Haiti Relief (on my Flickr page) event with a Noctilux @ f1 in its entirety @2500ISO (no flash and crappy light) and it turned out well.
    If the weather changes for the better, will probably use the Contax 645 for outdoors, as I have three backs and can easily change things around, film wise.
    Of course I could also get a flash for the M9 and scrap this whole thing...but that would be like cheating on my wife

  9. #39
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    If you are going to use the SB800, get a reflector if you are going to use it outside for fill and a diffuser for inside.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  10. #40
    MaximusM3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    If you are going to use the SB800, get a reflector if you are going to use it outside for fill and a diffuser for inside.


    Steve.
    Thanks, Steve...yep, all covered!

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