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  1. #11
    Ottrdaemmerung's Avatar
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    Markster: Kodak's Portra line is higher-end. In supermarkets you'll most often find Kodak Gold 100 and 200, and Kodak Max 400. Ektar and Portra are higher quality.
    website | Flickr
    "Embrace the negative with absolution, your final positive reward." --IQ, "The Province," Frequency

  2. #12
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    FWIW, my "avatar" was shot on Portra 800. More examples can be seen here... http://www.flickr.com/photos/ceholmb...7623168651497/

    I really enjoyed the film; and I'm sad that I might not get a chance to shoot 800z. At least Portra 800 is still around for now.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  3. #13
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    That looks about as grainy as the stuff I was using, the over-the-counter Kodak 800 stuff I bought as a Walgreens last December.
    -Markster

    Canon AE-1P 35mm | 50mm/f1.8 FDn | 28mm/2.8 FD | 70-200mm/f4-5 FD | 35-70mm/F2.8-3.5 Sigma FD

  4. #14
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Well, so be it. It was expiring as I shot it, but I don't know how it was stored before I got it. I think it provides a lovely pointilist effect personally.

    If you hate grain though... go get a Mark II and shoot it at 1600 all day with perfect results.

  5. #15

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    I've had good results with it like I said. Yes there is grain - it's 800 speed film. But not too bad. Use fresh stuff, don't underexpose, and get it processed/scanned at the right place.

    You can see other sizes here:
    flickr example

  6. #16
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Yeah, that looks much better. The 3 things you mentioned are all true; and mine probably fell short on all 3 to some extent.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  7. #17

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    One of the reasons Jose Villa uses film is that the workflow is efficient. It moves a lot of work off his shoulders and onto the lab's shoulders.

    Other successful shooters use strobes, even studio strobes, to light an entire ballroom if that's what it takes.

    The point I'm trying to make here is that all the highly successful shooters have all designed products for the markets they wanted to serve and found films/tools/methods that fit that are very reliable and repeatable and well defined to fit that very specific market, they did not design their products around the afternoon sun; their market was probably already having weddings there.
    This point struck home to me and perhaps I'm trying to grab a big chunk of the market instead of defining myself and picking out a work-able niche for me.
    I really like the way Jeff Ascough takes images, and I find I like a lot of B&W. And much like London, Vancouver gets a lot of grey days and rain... hence the necessity for higher speed ISOs. I could probably get away with TMAX 400 underexposed at 800, then Ilford Delta 3200 for further... color... well, I'll have to figure that part out.

    Still a work in progress!


    If you were getting green, that's most likely not from tungsten lighting but from fluorescents. Not that that fixes your problem...
    Yar. I think even my digital gets confused by this lighting. May be best to just stick to B&W for indoors for the most part, or color-corrected digital.


    Btw, I did have a chance to shoot 800Z and it's some great film. I shot an expired roll (2006!!) at 400 ISO and got great results! However, ASA 400 is pretty difficult for natural light in some of the darker areas I shoot.

  8. #18
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dugrant153 View Post
    This point struck home to me and perhaps I'm trying to grab a big chunk of the market instead of defining myself and picking out a work-able niche for me.
    I'm glad, these were hard won lessons for me.

    Deciding what jobs are important for you to do, and which jobs others can do more efficiently, is important. It is really tough to do it all well and efficiently and the tasks don't all pay the same.

    Paying a lab "a few measly bucks that the bride is already footing" means I get to spend a week marketing and selling new work instead of processing.

    Sales pays more, in fact selling something is the only way to get paid if you are working for yourself. It it the most important job a pro photographer has, bar none.

    That's the magic of Jose's workflow, he get's time to go sell.

    Quote Originally Posted by dugrant153 View Post
    I could probably get away with TMAX 400 underexposed at 800, then Ilford Delta 3200 for further... color... well, I'll have to figure that part out.
    Has the niche you want to sell to actually defined that, or is that a guess?

    Quote Originally Posted by dugrant153 View Post
    Still a work in progress!
    As are we all.

    Quote Originally Posted by dugrant153 View Post
    Yar. I think even my digital gets confused by this lighting. May be best to just stick to B&W for indoors for the most part, or color-corrected digital.
    Color doesn't have to be normal to work. http://www.flickr.com/photos/edwardolive/2902284127/

    Quote Originally Posted by dugrant153 View Post
    Btw, I did have a chance to shoot 800Z and it's some great film. I shot an expired roll (2006!!) at 400 ISO and got great results! However, ASA 400 is pretty difficult for natural light in some of the darker areas I shoot.
    Strobes are fun once you learn how to "bounce".
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #19

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    Deciding what jobs are important for you to do, and which jobs others can do more efficiently, is important. It is really tough to do it all well and efficiently and the tasks don't all pay the same.
    Duly noted! I find I spend a lot of time scanning (my lab's scans are nowhere near the quality I'm able to get out of my Epson 4990). But otherwise very little time in the "Develop" module for Lightroom.

    Has the niche you want to sell to actually defined that, or is that a guess?
    I think the look I go for and the types of environments I shoot in require this approach.


    Strobes are fun once you learn how to "bounce".
    Oh, I've done a lot of bounce flash with my digital. But slowly, that changed to no flash when I realized I was destroying the mood by letting a mini-lightning strike go from my camera

    I will use the flash for reaaaaaly dark times (like neither I or the camera can see anything!) and occasionally for other specific effects. But still prefer the natural light look.

  10. #20

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    Are you developing at home? If not, how much are you paying? I might suggest you either use NCPS, Precision Camera, or Richard Photo Lab for your developing and scanning. At $10-12 per roll for the first two and big scans, you could save yourself a significant amount of time...

    I'm waiting for 10 rolls back from Precision. First time I've used them and am looking forward to seeing what their 4000x6000 scans are like in person. I've seen smaller stuff from them online and it looks pretty good.

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