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  1. #21
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vpwphoto View Post
    For me I used to let it "rest" in tempered H20 after developemt and then into fixer. My rest seems to tempter the contrast and help shadow details develop a little more.
    That's a great idea and probably very useful when trying to extract extra shadow detail in low light / high contrast situations. I'll keep it in mind.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #22
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    @ Roger..

    I think these "don't expect much" comments come from folks who never shot high school basketball or football at 1/125 at f 3.5 and were rating tr-x at 1600+ to do it. Negs like that barely printed but that was life in journalism in 1974-1987. Fast forward to f 2 and 2.8 lens offerings, sodium vapor and merc vapor lights and more of them then p3200 arrived I could shoot some arenas at 1/750 of a second at 2.8 with p3200 at 1600 and the prints were magnificent. It all depends on where you came from and expectations. ps and dirrect flash photos sucked this was in the land before 1/250 and 1/125 syc speeds.. this was the land of 1/60!
    Last edited by vpwphoto; 01-18-2012 at 10:35 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    That's a great idea and probably very useful when trying to extract extra shadow detail in low light / high contrast situations. I'll keep it in mind.
    It's the same as using a water stop. In reality this "water bath" treatment produces essentially no compensating effect with current films and developers. You're better off with reduced agitation and/or dilute developers.

  4. #24
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    Learned it from a guy named Ansel that wrote a book or two!


    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    That's a great idea and probably very useful when trying to extract extra shadow detail in low light / high contrast situations. I'll keep it in mind.

  5. #25
    vpwphoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    It's the same as using a water stop. In reality this "water bath" treatment produces essentially no compensating effect with current films and developers. You're better off with reduced agitation and/or dilute developers.
    Rather THAN ASSUME!!! try it or not.. In college I had more than a few people comment on how damn good my high speed stuff looked compared to the other contrasty stuff shown around in the mid 1980's... and those compliments came from seasoned working photojournalists.


    Rather than post again to Michael1974 calling me sort of a starry eyed fool!. I agree that agitation is also key! for me I swear by my water bath rest for some situations...not telling how long I go!!!! It is longer than stop!
    Last edited by vpwphoto; 01-18-2012 at 10:06 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #26

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    I have tested this extensively. If you're referring to Adams, even he said water bath treatment doesn't work with modern films.

  7. #27

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    I've run TMZ (P3200) in T-Max dilute as a one shot developer and in TMRS as a replenished developer at the time recommended for 1600 or 3200 ASA and found better shadow detail and grain structure at 68 degrees and when I run 1600 at 3200 and 3200 at 6400. I've worked with TMZ since it first came out and with all its new and improved versions!

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by vpwphoto View Post
    Rather THAN ASSUME!!! try it or not.. In college I had more than a few people comment on how damn good my high speed stuff looked compared to the other contrasty stuff shown around in the mid 1980's... and those compliments came from seasoned working photojournalists.


    Rather than post again to Michael1974 calling me sort of a starry eyed fool!. I agree that agitation is also key! for me I swear by my water bath rest for some situations...not telling how long I go!!!! It is longer than stop!
    You can go as long as you want. It's not doing anything after the first few seconds besides increasing the risk of streaking. Anyway, I'm certainly not calling you a fool. It takes a lot more than an after-development water bath to make someone a fool

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